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Full text of "History of the parish of Buxhall in the county of Suffolk; with twenty-four full-plate illustrations and a large parish map (containing all the field names) specially drawn for the work"

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History of the Parish of BuxhalL 



HISTORY 



PARISH OF BUXHALL 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK 



WITH TWENTY-FOUR FULL-PLATE ILLUSTRATIONS 
AND A LARGE PARISH MAP (CONTAINING ALL THE 
FIELD NAMES) SPECIALLY DRAWN FOR THE WORK 



W. A. COPINGER, LL.D., F.S.A., F.R.S.A. 

Of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-Law, Professor of Law in the Owens College and 
Victoria University, and sometime President of the Bibliographical Society 



" Dear peaceful village ! though from thee 
My steps are wont to roam 
To distant scenes o'er earth and sea, 

Thou only art my home ; 
In thee alone my treasure lies — 
My all of joy beneath the skies ! " 

The Toxfoni Pod varied. 



LONDON 

H. SOTHERAN & CO., 140, STRAND 

1902 



2DcliiratClr 



HIS WIFE 



THE AUTHOR 



11427B3 

PREFACE 



THE drawings in this work have been made by Mr. William Ayliffe, of 
Manchester, and the plates executed by Taylor, Garnett, Evans & Co., 
Limited, at the Manchester Guardian Printing Works. The Map, which 
has been specially drawn for the work, is from a survey made at the beginning of 
the last century, and the field names are mostly taken from the book accompanying 
this survey compiled at the same time, but many of the earlier field names derived 
from other sources have also been introduced. I have to thank my son, Harold 
Bernard Copinger, for the Index. 

W. A. COPINGER. 
Kersal Cell, Manchester, 
April 12, 1902. 



CONTENTS. 



Introductory Itinerary ....... 

I. The Parish — Descriptive and Historic .... 

II. The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 

III. The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords ..... 

IV. The Free Tenants of the Manor of Buxhall and their Holdings 

V. The Copyhold Tenants of the Manor of Buxhall and their Holdings 
VI. The Three other Manors in Buxhall .... 

VII. Houses of Interest in the Parish ..... 
VIII. Early Wills, with Extracts relating to Property in the Parish 
IX. The Parish Registers from 1558 to 1700 . 

Appendix. Court Roll of Buxhall Manor, 3 Edw. VI. 

Translation of Court Roll, 5 and 6 Phil, and Mary 
Index ......••• 



77 
132 
148 
170 
190 

235 
244 
3°7 
310 
316 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BuxHALL Church 

Map of Parish, with Field Names 

Interior of Church 

The Mill . 

The Post Office . 

Buxhall Rectory . 

View in the Village 

COCKERELLS HaLL . 

Moat at Cockerells Hall 

Leffey Hall 

Fenn Hall 

Fasbourn Hall 

Buxhall Vale 

The Lodge 

Rivetts, or The Cottage 

The Maypole 

The Valley 

Coles Farm 

Hollybush . 

Park Farm 

The Butterfly 

Kennetts and the Blacksmith 

Barkers — now Howes 

Farthings and Cleves, with Fryers at 

Rudlands . . . . . 



Frontispiece 



13 
19 
37 
44 
77 
170 
176 
i8jt 
186 
190 
194 
196 
208 

212 
214 
216 
218 
222 
223 
225 
227 
228 
233 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



Allen, Mrs. 

Allen and Murray (E. G.) 
Andrews, Rev. L. \V. H. 
Appleton, Edgar Guaxt. 

ASHEK & Co. 

Betham, Rev. Canon, M.A. 

Bevan, a. Beckford. 

Board ok Education, South Kensington. 

Brooks, Francis Augustus, M.D. 

Brown, Rev. J. Wilson D. 

Bussell, Rev. Dr. F. W. 

Carr, Wm. 

Casley, Henry Clement. 

Chetham Library, Manchester. 

Cl.\yton, James. 

Clover, Charles P. 

CoBBOLD, Felix T. 

Cornish, J. E. 

Crosse, C. J. Ernest. 

De Caux, Wm. 

DoDD, Mead & Co. (3 Copies). 

Downing, Wm. 

Earle, Joseph Sim, F.S.A. 

Easton, Thomas O. 

Ellis, Mrs. Edward. 

Emmott, Prof. Geo. H. 

Firman, Walter. 

Preston, Thos. Westfaling. 

GiBBS, H. Martin. 

Gilbert and Sons. 

Gudgeons, Peecock, and Prentice. 

Guildhall Library, London. 

Harrison, W. E. 

Haslewood, Rev. F. G., LL.D., D.C.L. 

Hervey, Lord John. 

Hervey, Rev. S. H. A. 

Hill, Rev. H. Copinger (2 Copies). 

Holman, F. Wilson. 

Hovenden, Robert, F.S.A. 

Howe, Miss. 

Jarrold and Sons. 

Killmister, Geo. R. 

Layton, Rev. W. E. 

Leeds Public Free Library. 

Manchester Public Free Libraries. 



Macfarline-Grieve, Wm. Alex., M.A., F.S.A. Scot. 

Marshall, Geo. W., LL.D., F.S.A. (Rouge Croix). 

Methold, Thos. Tindal, K.C. 

New England Historic Genealogical Society. 

New York Historical Society. 

Olorenshaw, Rev. J. R. 

OvEY, Mrs. Isabella. 

Partridge, Charles, M.A. 

Patchett, Alfred. 

Pettiward, R. J. 

Pitcher, W. N. 

Precious, J. 

Preston, Richard. 

Powell, E. 

Railton, Alex. B. 

Read and Barrett. 

Reform Club. 

Richer, Wm. 

Rivett-Carnac, Col., CLE., F.S.A., A.D.C. to the 

King. 
Roby, a. G. 
Salmon, Nigel G. 
Sawyer, John. 
Scott, R. F. 
Sedgwick, S. G. 
Smith, E. T. Leeds. 
Stechert, G. E. 
Sotherax & Co. (10 Copies) 
Sotheran, Hy. Cecil. 
Spalding, J. T. 
Stearn, Thos. 

Stevens and Brown (3 Copies). 
Stevenson, Francis Seymour, M.P. 
Suffolk Institute of Arch.^ologv. 
Wakerley, Arthur. 
Webster, Isaac. 
Wells, Eugene. 
Westwood, Arthur. 
Wigan Free Public Libkauv. 
Wightman, Arthur. 
Wild, Rev. E. J. 
Wilkinson, Wm. King, M.A. 
Wilson, James. 
Wiseman, Wm. 



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V 
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CONTRACTIONS. 

A. Acres. 

C. Close 

F. Field. 

L. Lay. 

M. Meadow. 

0. Orchard. 

P. Pasture. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



Allen, Mrs. 

Allen- and Murray (E. G.) 
Andrews, Rev. L. W. H. 
Appleton, Edgar Guant. 

ASHER & Co. 

Betham, Rev. Caxox, M.A. 

Bevan, a. Beckford. 

Board of Education, South Kensington. 

Brooks, Francis Augustus, M.D. 

Brown, Rev. J. Wilson D. 

Bussell, Rev. Dr. F. W. 

Carr, Wm. 

Casley, Henry Clement. 

Chetham Library, Manchester. 

Cl.^yton, James. 

Clover, Charles P. 

Cobbold, Felix T. 

Cornish, J. E. 

Crosse, C. J. Ernest. 

De Caux, Wm. 

DoDD, Mead & Co. (3 Copies). 

Downing, Wm. 

Earle, Joseph Sim, F.S.A. 

Easton, Thomas O. 

Ellis, Mrs. Edward. 

Emmott, Prof. Geo. H. 

Firman, Walter. 

Freston, Thos. Westfaling. 

Gibbs, H. Martin. 

Gilbert and Sons. 

Gudgeons, Peecock, and Prentice. 

Guildhall Library, London. 

Harrison, W. E. 

Haslewood, Rev. F. G., LL.D., D.C.L. 

Hervey, Lord John. 

Hervey, Rev. S. H. A. 

Hill, Rev. H. Copinger (2 Copies). 

Holman, F. Wilson. 

HovENDEN, Robert, F.S.A. 

Howe, Miss. 

Jarrold and Sons. 

KiLLMiSTER, Geo. R. 

Layton, Rev. W. E. 

Leeds Public Free Library. 

Manchester Public Free Libraries. 



Macfarline-Grieve, Wm. Alex., M.A., F.S.A. Scot. 

Marshall, Geo. W., LL.D., F.S.A. (Rouge Croix). 

Methold, Thos. Tindal, K.C. 

New England Historic Genealogical Society. 

New York Historical Society. 

Olorenshaw, Rev. J. R. 

OvEY, Mrs. Isabella. 

Partridge, Charles, M.A. 

Patchett, Alfred. 

Pettiward, R. J. 

Pitcher, W. N. 

Precious, J. 

Preston, Richard. 

Powell, E. 

Railton, Alex. B. 

Read and Barrett. 

Reform Club. 

Richer, Wm. 

Rivett-Carnac, Col., CLE., F.S.A., A.D.C. to the 

King. 
RoBY, A. G. 
Salmon, Nigel G. 
Sawyer, John. 
Scott, R. F. 
Sedgwick, S. G. 
Smith, E. T. Leeds. 
Stechert, G. E. 
Sotheran & Co. (10 Copies) 
Sotheran, Hy. Cecil. 
Spalding, J. T. 
Stearn, Thos. 

Stevens and Brown (3 Copies). 
Stevenson, Francis Seymour, M.P. 
Suffolk Institute of Arch.bology. 
Wakerley, Arthur. 
Webster, Isaac. 
Wells, Eugene. 
Westwood, Arthur. 
Wigan Free Public Library. 
WiGHTM.iN, Arthur. 
Wild, Rev. E. J. 
Wilkinson, Wm. King, M.A. 
Wilson, James. 
Wiseman, Wm. 




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HISTORY OF THE PARISH OF BUXHALL 



Introductory Itinerary 

BY way of general introduction to the Parish, and in order to convey a sketch 
of its characteristic features, we propose making a perambulation confined 
to its roads, which may be easily followed on the Plan of the Parish 
intended to accompany the present work. During the course of our journey 
we will notify the several features of interest. 

The usual approach to the village of Buxhail is from the neighbouring railway 
station of Stowmarket through Great Finborough, and this course we follow. The 
first object in Buxhail which meets the eye is situate at the extreme easterly 
end of the village and at the junction of the high road with the Finborough 
highway or road leading to Hitcham, and is " The Lodge " — a fitting name to 
find attached to the first house which presents itself on approaching, and indeed 
on entering, the Parish. The name in former days was " Bannels," and the 
property was held as a free tenement ot the Manor in the time of Henry VIII. 
by John Warde, of Woolpit. At the back of the Lodge, and actually joining, 
but fronting to the road, are two cottages used in connection with the Lodge 
farm. Continuing in the course of the road to the village, we pass along what 
was formerly known as " Gardiner Street " and over Gardiner's Bridge, which 
portion of the road at one time had several houses on each side, all of which 
have, however, long since disappeared. On arriving at the top of the hill, at the 
junction of the road with that to Brettenham, stands a signpost on the site 
formerly occupied by the village stocks. From this point, looking in a westerly 
direction, can be obtained an excellent view through the trees of the east end of 
the beautiful old Parish Church and of the Rectory built in 1710; the latter 
probably displaying the humility of the pious Rector who endeavoured to erect a 

2 ' 



2 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

personal dwelling-house calculated by contrast to bring out the venerable grandeur 
of the adjoining House of God. A little further on the right we come to the old 
residence of one branch of the ancient family of Sulyards, now known as the 
Maypole Farm, but formerly known as Maidwells, and on the left discern a row 
of cottages occupying the site of an ancient dwelling known as Kennetts in the 
time of Henry VIII., and then belonging to the Rycher family. Here too stands 
the old blacksmith's shop, renowned in days gone by (for it has existed for close 
on two centuries) for the excellent work turned out, and famous as the origin 
from which sprang one of the largest and most important ironworks established 
in the county of Suffolk. The road at this point, and up to the junction with 
Fen Street, is, or was formerly, known as Church Street. 

On quitting the blacksmith's, we gradually ascend, and the first object on 
the left is the village Post Office, near which, on the same side of the way, is a 
charming cottage quite in the old style of rustic beauty. The two houses were 
formerly in one holding, and were known as Barkers, having been so called as early 
as the twelfth year of Henry VIII., when the property was granted by the lord of 
the manor of Buxhall to Richard Revell, or Revitt, and his heirs. Proceeding 
yet further up the hill, on the left side of the way we pass two cottages 
overlooking the southern portion of the village in the direction of the Church. 
These two cottages occupy the site of an old residence known as " Fryers," which 
in the time of Henry VIII. was the dwelHng of one Martin Recher, and was 
retained in the Recher family for a hundred years or so as copyholders of the 
Manor of Buxhall. Probably the name is a corruption of " Friars," from 
the house having been the residence of some monks who settled here in early 
times. This no doubt accounts for its having been erected not as all others about, 
fronting the road, but facing and looking on to the Church, for probably in those 
days nothing intervened between it and the Church. It will be remembered that an 
order of the Grey Friars came to Bury about 1256. They lived not in stately 
abbeys or in the luxury of monastic grandeur, but resided among the people of 
whom they formed a part, though retiring occasionally to central establishments for 
spiritual refreshment and recuperative power. Fryers was not unlikely the tenement 
which William de Amaville and Milholdis his wife gave to the Abbey of St. John's, 
Colchester. Immediately behind Fryers, and at the corner where the road turns at 
right angles in a westerly direction, stands what was lately the Parish Room and 
Village Library, occupying what was once the site of two messuages anciently known 
as " Farthings " and " Cleves," which in the time of Henry VIII. were held as free 



Introductory Itinerary 3 

tenements of the Manor by the Cages, and later by the Salters, a family which 
flourished in Buxhall for several centuries. The road is also continued in a northerly 
direction and is then known as Fen Street, and leads to Buxhall Vale. This road, 
however, we will not pursue at present, but follow that which passes off to the 
west from the Stowmarket road. This continues in a circuitous course for some 
distance fairly level, passing on the left the elaborate and well ordered workshops 
of the highly esteemed Mr. John Sawyer, contractor and builder ; and still further, 
on the left, a group of four picturesque cottages of more modern type than those 
which have heretofore met our view, two on the main road and two round the 
corner bordering a footpath leading to the Church. A few yards further, on the 
right, we come to two separate dwellings, one known as Bennetts and the other as 
Highams, the first of which was in the time of Henry VIII. held as a free tenement 
of the Manor by the Bacon family and later by the Martins ; and the latter was 
also in ancient times held free of the Manor, and was in the time of Queen Mary 
owned by George Salter. These two dwellings are now occupied as five tenements 
by Messrs. Durrant, Castel, Frost, and Harry and John Sawyer. Immediately after 
passing Highams, and on the same side of the way, our eyes rest on the picturesque 
place where not long since resided Miss Mary Hill, the only daughter of a former 
Rector, Copinger Hill. It has for some time been known as " The Cottage," but 
in the time of Queen Elizabeth was known as "Revitts," no doubt by reason of one 
of this ancient and honourable family, some time lords of the Manors of Rattlesden, 
Wood Hall, and Fenn Hall, having resided here. In the latter part of Elizabeth's 
reign the house was known as Windishes, or Wymhysshes, and was the residence 
of the Martin family from that time to the beginning of the eighteenth century. 
The quaint old rooms within are worthy of inspection, and the loving care which 
the late Miss Hill extended to the grounds and surroundings in her day rendered a 
passing glance a look of pleasure. 

From this house there is a fine view over the old lawn (occasionally used as 
the village cricket ground), the eye catching, in the distance a glimpse of the 
famous old walnut-trees which stand in the " Old Hall Meadow " and the " Old 
Orchard " at the westerly end of the Parish Church. 

Continuing our course along the road shortly after leaving " Revitts," there is 
a slight declivity, and at the bottom, on the right, we pass the old well used by the 
cottagers in this district. It is prettily backed by a small plantation. The beauty 
of the spot has, however, passed away, for the local Council have recently fenced 
off the well with corrugated and galvanised iron palings such as is often used 



4 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

for roofing. It is said that Corporations are bodies without souls — this perhaps 
accounts for their lack of the artistic sentiment ! From this point in the road, 
there is a gradual rise, and almost immediately after leaving the well we pass on 
the left two cottages occupying the site of one erected in 1635 by John Wade on 
the waste of the Manor ; and further, on the same side, the Crown Inn, the only 
house of public resort in which the village rejoices. Not unlikely this wayside 
inn may before long develop into something more imposing, as it stands not far 
from a celebrated chalybeate spring, once the resort of pilgrims and seekers after 
health, but which has been practically lost sight of during the last three-score years. 
The water has been conducted through pipes to the Buxhall fish-ponds. Shortly 
after passing the necessary complement of a popular village — that is, if we do so 
without staying too long within admiring its interior and testing its resources — we 
catch a glimpse on the left of the Buxhall Mill — the " half-mill " of the Domesday 
Survey now blooming as a whole one — and, continuing on the Rattlesden road, 
commence to descend, midway passing a couple of woebegone cottages of dejected 
mien, and near the foot of the hill catch sight, on the right, ot the ancient 
dwelling (now occupied as two tenements) called Cates Coates, copyhold of the 
Manor and held by Mr. William Richer, of Rattlesden, in which dwelling resided 
in the reign of Henry VIII. one Clemens Warren. 

At this point of the road we start up a slight incline, and near the summit, 
still on the right, come to the barns and outhouses occupied in connection with 
the Hollybush Farm. These stand on the site of a residence in early times 
known as " Barons," which occupied the plot at the junction of the main road 
with the way running in a northerly direction therefrom known as Barons Lane. 

This house, which was burnt down many years ago, belonged to William 
Copinger and was left by his will in 1436 to his brother John Copinger, and 
formed part of the demesne land until 4 Edward VI., when it was granted by 
the lord of the manor, 30th September, to Robert Rydnel, and remained in that 
family till 1650, when it was sold to Thomasyne Copinger and was merged again 
in the demesne lands. It now, however, forms part of the Hollybush property, 
which comprises the farm a few yards beyond. This farm was formerly known as 
" Gunnels " or " Waspe Hall," and for many years was held with the Cockerells 
Hall Estate. About a quarter of a mile beyond, on the left, we arrive at the 
entrance gates to Cockerells Hall, the ancient Manor House of the Cockerells, 
subsequently ol the Veseys, later of Gregory Copinger, the last High Sheriff of 
the joint counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, and now the property of the writer. 



Introductory Itinerary 5 

A few hundred yards beyond these entrance gates we arrive at the boundary of 
the parish and its junction with the parish of Rattlesden. 

There are three main roads, striking off to the left almost at right angles 
from the road we have just traversed, and these we will consider in detail, 
beginning with that which runs off or is in one sense a continuation of the main 
road at the point where it enters the parish, namely, at " The Lodge." This was 
anciently known as Hygh Street, and is now known as the Finborough high road, 
being the main road to Hitcham. For some distance down this road the land on 
the right is mostly in the parish of Buxhall and that on the left is almost 
exclusively in that of Great Finborough. A little way down on the right formerly 
stood an edifice known as Costards, but this has entirely disappeared. About a 
hundred yards or so down the same road we come to the Almshouses, two small 
cottages used as the residence of ladies who have arrived at an age to which 
ladies in higher circles never admittedly attain and who have not been provided 
with this world's goods in an excessive degree. These old ladies have the 
advantage of residing on the borders of two estates, and consequently enjoy the 
privilege of being tenderly cared for by the female visitants of both. It should 
be mentioned that there existeth a tradition handed down from a time whence 
the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, as the legal phrase goes, that no 
inhabitant of the parish of Buxhall has ever experienced the necessity of seeking 
refuge and protection in those spacious dwellings provided by the piety and 
enforced charity of a united district. These two cottages probably occupy the site 
of the tenement called Taylors in the time of Henry VIII., which was held of the 
Manor of Buxhall by knights' service, for which William Goodridge did fealty, 
July 22, 1554. 

The first road on the right, almost at the extreme south-easterly limit of the 
Parish of Buxhall, touching the Finborough high road is a way leading to the 
Stone and the Butterfly Farms. This way is now known as Borough Lane, but in 
ancient times was known as a " way leading to ' Wards ' " or " to Mr. North's 
house." The road, as such, does not now actually lead much beyond the Stone 
Farm premises, but in former times evidently was continued up to the Butterfly or 
"Wards." Returning to the high road and proceeding thence in a southerly 
direction, we arrive at the road also running off to the right known as Cogman's 
Lane. This is a winding lane connecting Finborough high road with Broadbrook 
Street, and running as far as it lies in Buxhall between lands occupied with the 
Butterfly and those of the Park Farm. 



6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

The second of the roads above mentioned as running off at right angles to 
the Stowmarket and Buxhall road is known as the Brettenham road. About one 
hundred yards down this road we pass on the right the main entrance to the 
Rectory, and yet further on one of the entrances to the Churchyard, and on the 
left a road, known as Broadbrook Street, leading to World's End ; that road will 
be subsequently described. Immediately after passing the Church lands we come to 
the Old Makings, standing in a prominent position on the right, almost on the 
road, and commanding a charming view of the country around. In this building 
recently the Courts of the Manor of Buxhall have been held. 

Not many yards beyond the Makings stands (also on the right) the Buxhall 
Estate Office, a model cottage erected after original designs of a former Rector, 
Copinger Hill, for which he obtained the Gold Medal or other prize of the Royal 
Agricultural Society for agricultural dwellings. The road continues in a westerly 
direction for some distance until it joins the road leading from the Mill to 
Brettenham. The last field on the right, immediately before such junction, is that 
provided for the village allotments, and in the south-westerly corner of this field 
stand two pretty little cottages, overlooking the Leffey meadows. The third road 
above mentioned as running off the Stowmarket and Buxhall high road, is known 
for some way as Mill Street, further on anciently as Spitleman's Street (probably after 
John Spetelman, who lived here in the time of Henry IV.), then as Crosse Street, i 
and finally settles down to the more general name of the Brettenham Road. It 
runs on the westerly side of the Mill, the Primitive Methodist Chapel, and a 
certain group of cottages which have been erected on the westerly side of Buxhall 
Green, but so placed as not to interfere with the entrance from this road to the 
Green. The Mill Green must not be confused with Buxhall Green, anciently 
known as Buxhall Tye. The large field on the right, running up to the Buxhall 
and Rattlesden high road on the north, and to the road we are now traversing 
on the east, was formerly known as the Mill field, and at the extreme south- 
easterly corner, but in the adjoining field, stands the Village Board School, erected 
in 1877 for the accommodation of seventy-five children. About a quarter of a 
mile along this road, on the left, and running at right angles thence to Broadbrook 
Street near Fasbourn Hall, is Kiln Lane, at the junction of which with Brettenham 
Street stands on one side a fine old barn and on the other a large pond. 
Opposite to this, on the right, stands a quaint old house with a pump in front. 
This is the ancient Manor-house of Leffey Hall, which has seen many changes of 
' So called after a member of the ancient family of Crosse. 



Introductory Itinerary y 

ownership, having been the inheritance of the Weylands in the time of Edward L, 
and of Lord Burghersh, who lived at Onehouse in the time of Edward III., 
and having subsequently passed through the hands of Lord Despenser, Sir Robert 
Haughton, one of the Justices of the King's Bench in the time of James I., and 
later those of Sir Edward Hungerford and the Rychers, and being now owned 
by Mr. Lambert. On the southerly side of Leffey Hall runs a pretty little 
pathway known as the " Lovers' Walk," leading up to Cockerells Hall, and on 
the southerly boundary of this walk stands an ancient row of houses known as 
" Smythes, formerly Bradstret," so called after William Bradstret, who had this 
property in the time of Henry VIII., and whose family retained it until the 35 
Elizabeth. It was copyhold of Buxhall Manor, and only enfranchised as recently as 
1887. Adjoining this property, on the same side of the way, is a copyhold 
formerly known as Hawds, which was granted by Walter Copinger, the then lord 
of the Manor of Buxhall, to Henry Muskett, a member of an old family in these 
parts in the time of Henry VIII. 

On the left, a little further on, we pass a modern farmhouse known as 
" Mulletts," now belonging to Mr. J. H. Hammond, of Colchester, but occupied 
by Mr. Thomas Williams, and a little beyond, on the right, we observe two cottages, 
which are used in connection with Mulletts Farm. On the south of these, and 
running off from the Brettenham road in a westerly direction, is a road which 
leads into Mickerie Lane, a name now unhappily perverted into Misery Lane, but 
running north and south and conveniently dividing the Parish of Buxhall on the 
west from the Parish of Rattlesden on the east. This lane for nearly the whole of 
its length, so far as it is co-extensive with lands in Buxhall, forms the westerly 
boundary of the Cockerells Hall Estate. 

We now begin to descend a hill, passing on the left Whalebone Cottage, 
the pretty and neatly kept residence of Mr. Thomas Stearn, and half-way down the 
hill, on the right, a farm known as " Kemball's Farm," enshrouded with lofty trees 
and adorned with a pond, in a most charming position. Off the road about here, 
on the left, are certain copyholds, held of the Manor of Buxhall, with an interesting 
devolution of title. 

At the foot of the hill where a road branches off almost at right angles, is 
a field known as " the old Ponde field," which some three hundred years ago was 
held by the Duke of Norfolk as a free tenant of the Manor of Buxhall, and subse- 
quently by Sir Robert Houghton, one of the Chief Justices of the King's Bench ; 
and where the road turns in a westerly direction and on the right stands Noah's 



8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Ark Farm. After proceeding some two or three hundred yards further on, this 
road again turns in a southerly direction and forms the boundary between the 
parishes of Buxhail and Brettenham. 

The only house before the end of the parish in this direction on the left is 
the Pye Hatch Farm, the property of the Kynge family in the time of Henry 
VIII., and later of the Kemballs, who held it till 1619. After passing through 
a succession of hands, it has rested finally in those of a purchaser from Mr. 
Gudgeon, of Stowmarket, who recently enfranchised, for this property was held as 
copyhold of the Manor of Buxhall. Immediately behind the farm last mentioned 
is the well-known wood called from very early times the " Pyes Hatch Wood," 
which though nearly two miles distant from the Buxhall Estate, has always formed 
part of it. 

We now return to the road leading in a southerly direction from the 
Brettenham road, and to which we have already referred as the road leading to 
World's End. This was in early times known as Wood Street, and later as Broad- 
brook Street. At the foot of the hill leading from the Church of Buxhall, and on 
the left, is a model cottage, having a neat and comfortable appearance, and on the 
same side, at the bottom of the hill, and just opposite the Valley Farm, 
stand two cottages, erected on land formerly part copyhold of the Manor and 
part freehold, whereon stood an edifice known in the time of Henry VII. as 
" Browys," but later more generally known as " Browns " or " Salters," which in 
the time of Henry VII. belonged to Isabella Glanvyle, and for some time belonged 
to Gregory Copinger, of Cockerells Hall. On the right, we pass the Valley Farm, 
formerly known as " Wallers," a considerable portion of which was at one time held 
by free tenants of the Manor, all now absorbed in the Buxhall Estate. It is at 
present the residence of Mr. Robert Williams, one of the churchwardens of the 
parish, as tenant of the Buxhall Estate. 

Continuing the course of this road, we pass on the right a house known as 
" Rudlands," so called after a family who held it in 1650 and subsequently. 
It is a quaint old dwelling of fine old oak, and was granted by Walter Copinger, 
19 Henry VIII., to Andreas Ellyce and Joan his wife, to be held as copyhold, but the 
land not having been originally customary, an attempt was made in the time of 
Elizabeth to confirm it. The confirmation was obviously bad, but the matter is 
not of importance, as about one hundred and fifty years ago it was again absorbed 
in the Buxhall Estate. The next house on the same side is Coles Farm. This 
ancient house is well worth inspection, the fine old oak beams and one remaining 



Introductory Itinerary 9 

room of large dimensions revealing its former importance. It originally formed part 
of the old family estate of the Copingers, but one moiety, under the will of one of 
the Hills, passed into other hands for some years. It has gone under various names, 
being in the early part of the seventeenth century know^n as " Powells " and later 
as " Pelborowes." A little beyond Coles Farm, but on the left, we come to 
Cogmans Lane, already referred to, at the junction of which stand two cottages 
facing the main road. Their appearance is not such as to invite a continued stay, 
so passing on we come in view on the right of the ancient mansion house ot the 
Copingers, known as Fasbourn Hall, leading up to which we discern a bridge 
spanning the fine moat, which at one time entirely surrounded this dwelling. The 
house is built of red brick, and obviously was in early days of much larger 
dimensions. When the foliage is not too thick an interesting mound, supposed to 
be a barrow of Danish origin, surmounted with lofty trees, may be seen from 
the road. 

The road here branches into two. That on the right, running in a winding 
direction until its junction with the Brettenham road, is the lane already mentioned 
as Kiln Lane. Immediately before entering on it we perceive on the left a cottage 
of poor appearance which is now used in connection with Fasbourn Hall — usually 
occupied by the horseman employed there. 

Kiln Lane is of such a tortuous description that pedestrians desirous of 
arriving at one end from the other usually prefer to patronise a footpath running 
through the meadows — one of which rejoices in the sanguinary name of the Bloody 
Meadow so called on account of a fight between two harvesters with scythes, 
resulting in each cutting off the head of the other — such footpath enabling one to 
leave untrodden much of this eccentric winding lane. Not far from its junction 
with Brettenham Street, on the left, stands a small farm now the residence of Mr. 
William Williams. It is of modern construction and of no particular interest. 
The road on the left from Wood Street or Broadbrook Street runs for some way 
due south along the lands of the Park Farm, and from this point is known as 
World's End Lane. The Park Farm, formerly known as Hardhols or Hardheads, 
has from time immemorial formed part of the Buxhall estate of the Copingers, and 
in 1647 was occupied by Henry Reynolds, in 168 1 by John Pilborowe, and 1689 
by Gregory Copinger of Cockerells Hall. In 1763 it passed under the name of 
Frosts, and was farmed by Mr. Bendal. The house is of considerable age, and the 
entrance is by steps over a wall of about five feet high surrounding the house. 
Three ponds here, of various sizes on three different levels, are worthy of 

3 



lo History of the Parish of Buxhall 

notice. The road on leaving the lands of the Park Farm takes a south-easterly 
course for some two hundred yards. The second field on the right, known as 
" Petits Ley," is of interest as being the site of an ancient farmhouse known as 
" Petits," respecting which there was a dispute about 1690 between the Copingers 
and Sir Edward Ward, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. Almost immediately 
after passing Petits Ley the road takes a direct southerly course past the farms 
called Sweeps Hall and Pond Farm until it arrives at World's End Wood. Here 
it turns at right angles and runs in a westerly direction, forming the 
southerly boundary both of the World's End Wood and of the Pye Hatch 
Wood, a little beyond the latter joining the road from Buxhall to Brettenham 
already described. On the westerly side of World's End Wood, leading in a 
northerly direction from the road last described, is Cooper's Lane, which leads to 
Hivetree Farm and Churnmilk Farm. No road actually exists at the present day, 
but the course is perfectly clear, being represented by a meadow of the usual width 
of a country road with trees on each side, and the road, as such, is shown in a Map 
of the Parish made in 1800. A couple of small cottages stand near the spot where 
Cooper's Lane joins World's End Lane, and on the same road (if we may use the 
term, for it is somewhat broken here), nearer to Pye Hatch Wood, are one or two 
other smaller cottages. 

The only other road in the parish which has not been described is that known 
as Fen Street, running in a northerly direction from the village to Buxhall Vale. 
A little way down this road, on the left, stands the farm known as Brook Farm, 
and slightly further on, on the right, Purple Hill Farm. The latter is now occupied 
as two cottages, but in days gone by was a residence of some importance. It was 
known as Rysbye or Ryssebyes at the beginning of the sixteenth century, and was 
held by the Salters as a free tenement of the Manor, being held by service of one 
" Clavigariofile " per annum and suit of court. It was certainly for over a hundred 
years in the Salter family. After passing Purple Hill we descend, and on the 
left soon come in sight of Buxhall House, or The Vale, as it is now called, 
the property of Mr. Gerald Richard Garnham, but the present residence of the 
very popular Master of the Suffolk Fox Hounds — Mr. Eugene Wells. This 
property in the time of Henry VIII. belonged to the Salters, and subsequently 
to the Pilborowes, passing in the seventeenth century to the Goddard family, then 
to the Maltywards, and finally to the Garnhams. 

At Paines Bridge, which stands on this road opposite the Vale, this road passes 
out of the Parish into the Parish of Onehouse. A branch, however, near Little 



Introductory Itinerary 1 1 

Fenn Farm enters the Parish, and after running slightly in a northerly direction, 
is divided into two branches ; one, running north past Deepwell Cottages, enters 
the Parish of Rattlesden, and the other, after running in a southerly direction then 
westerly and passing at the back of Fenn Hall, an ancient manorial residence, in the 
time of William the Conqueror belonging to Frodo, brother of Baldwin, Abbot of 
Bury, and later to the Revitts, now belonging to the Spinks family (the Manor 
being in Sir Joshua-Thelluson Rowley), joins Barons Lane, where it takes a course 
due south and finds exit in the Buxhall and Rattlesden road at the Hollybush Farm. 
Here we take leave of the reader to enter upon the more serious portion 
of our work. 

" Oh ! in a spot so fair as this, 

Which Nature's heavenly hand 
Has painted for her bower of bliss. 

Her Eden of the land ; 
In this fair spot life's stream should glide 
One sweet, unchanged, unbroken tide." 



CHAPTER I 
The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 

NOTWITHSTANDING the importance and antiquity of the Parish of 
Buxhall, vying, so far as age is concerned, with the oldest portion of 
inhabitable land in the realm and the conservative principles which 
animate the heart of the writer, it is not proposed to follow the good old example 
of tracing the condition of the parish from the time of the Deluge, or even from 
the age of the Roman Visitation. Some have piously thought it absolutely necessary 
that the historian should arbitrarily descend from generals to particulars in this way, 
and that the orthodox mode of commencing the history of a hundred or of a parish 
is to start, say, with a dissertation of the original formation of the earth out of 
chaos, then by gradual steps approach to the historic period, and by a due system 
of development arrive at the history proper of Great Britain. After descending so 
far in the historic chain all is plain-sailing to our orthodox historian. The county 
at large is, of course, next to be treated, and then the hundred — all more and more 
in detail as one descends nearer the topic specially the subject of investigation. 
The very excellent, and one may fairly say exceptionally interesting, History of 
Stowmarket by the late Mr. HoUingsworth is a modified example of what is meant. 
Loder affords another illustration in his well-known History of Framlingham. He 
thus opens his eleventh chapter on the Parish Church : " The solemn duties of 
Religion have been performed all along from the beginning of the World in places 
set apart for that Purpose : Adam in Paradise had where to present himself before 
God ; and his sons out of Paradise whither to bring their Sacrifices." These 
statements are supported by various references to Genesis, and we do not come to 
the particulars of Framlingham Church until we have been pleasantly but cautiously 
led through dissertations on the places of worship of the patriarchs, the groves 
of the heathen, the Tabernacle of the Jews, the first erection of Christian churches 
in other lands, and ultimately of their erection in this country. There is probably 
much to urge in favour of such system of reductive development. Still one with 



14 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

unsympathetic eye can hardly feign to regard the system — the converse of the 
elephant standing on the tortoise — as somewhat analogous to the raising of a 
pyramid of stone for the support of a threepenny bit ! 

It would not be a just inference to deduce from what we have said that all 
extraneous consideration or investigation into what may have gone on in the 
neighbourhood should be excluded from the history of any particular place. On 
the contrary, we are prepared to admit that it is seldom the origin, life, rise, and 
development of any particular village, can be properly treated otherwise than in 
connection with at least its immediate surroundings ; for it must of necessity be 
influenced by the condition of its neighbouring towns and partake of their joys 
and sorrows. Few faults of the historian are so disastrous in their effect as the 
ignoring of outside interests and their influence on the production of any 
particular result. 

Buxhall is an interesting but somewhat scattered village in the hundred of 
Stow and county of Sufix)lk, three and a half miles west by south-west or 
Stowmarket station, on the Great Eastern Railway, twelve miles from Bury St. 
Edmunds, fifteen from Ipswich — the county town — and eighty-four miles from London. 
It is in the eastern division of the county, and in the diocese of Norwich, but for 
County Council purposes is in East Suffolk and the Combs division. It forms, 
in fact, with Combs, Finborough Magna, Finborough Parva, Onehouse, Harleston, 
and Shelland, the Combs division of the Stow Union (East Suffolk), and with 
Finborough Magna, Harleston, Onehouse, and Shelland, the Buxhall polling-station 
of the North-Western or Stowmarket division of the county for Parliamentary 
purposes, the place of election being Bury St. Edmunds. 

Buxhall is surrounded by six parishes. If one begins from, the south and 
proceeds eastward, the adjacent parishes are Finborough, Onehouse, Shelland, 
Rattlesden, Brettenham, and Hitcham. The Parish contains 2560-093 acres of 
land, and the rateable value is ;^3,99i 15s. 6d. At the time of the Domesday 
Survey the population was 200 The increase has not been rapid, for in 1 800 
it had but a population of 385. In 181 1 the population was 415,' in 1821 
457, in 1831 466, in 1841 533, in 1871 488, in 1881 476, in 1891 424, in 
1 901 402. The number of houses in 1794 was 70. The majority of the 
houses and cottages forming the village are of picturesque design and well 
situated. They are mostly built of the clay of the neighbourhood and 
thatched with straw. Originally the mode of covering these dwellings seems to 
' A note in the Parish Books says 412. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 15 

have been by heaping on the roof sods or fern or heath, which apparently 
answered the purpose of keeping off the inclemencies of the weather ; but this 
mode gave place by degrees to the laying on of straw or haum in a more regular 
manner. The first refinements in roofing were shingles, which are very ancient. 
Tiles until recently, though commonly in use from the beginning of the sixteenth 
century, found no place on the roofs of the Buxhall cottages. 

Buxhall is called in Domesday Book Bukessalla-buresalla, from 5/^r-bures, a 
Bower or dwelling and hala — healthy, or saU the hall, the bower of health, or 
healthy hall.' B tikes- salla,^ the hall of flagons. The one meaning has reference 
to its elevated and salubrious situation, and the other to its hospitable owner. 

Buxhall is true to its name, for it is undoubtedly one of the most invigorating 
districts in the kingdom, as the remarkable age obtained by many of its inhabitants 
abundantly testifies. It is unquestionably one of the driest climates in this country, 
and the rainfall is exceptionally low. The frosts are severe, and the north-east winds 
in the spring are sharp and prevalent. " There is not perhaps," says Young, the 
the great agriculturist, " a county in England which contains a greater diversity of 
soil or more clearly discriminated than Suffolk." In Buxhall it is a strong loam 
on a clay-marl bottom. In ordinary phraseology the soil is often, but improperly, 
styled clay ; for analysis proves that it abounds with more sand than the texture 
would seem to imply, so that were it lying on a gravel, sand, or chalk, it would 
be called sandy loam ; but being on a retentive clay-marl bottom is properly, from 
its wetness, to be termed strong or clayey loam. It is in most parts highly 
productive, and in this parish has been grown the prize wheat of the county. 

On the score of health Mr. Hollingsworth, dealing with the Stow hundred 
generally, and writing on the subject under the record of 1600 to 161 8, says: 
" The air was considered in this neighbourhood and round Bury St. Edmunds to 
be so healthful, pure, and bracing, it was ' so purged and refined ' by the wind, and 
' deemed so very apt and fit for recovery of health,' that physicians after an illness 
ordered their patients to come from other shires into these parts to restore their 
constitution. ' The wholesome sweetnesse of the aire ' attracted and kept here 
many gentry. This ancient testimony to the healthiness of this hundred and of 
the whole district between the town [of Stowmarket] and Bury may be proved by 
the experience of any invalid now who is recovering from illness. The bracing 
refinement of the air has not changed in two centuries. Upon these qualities of 
the air ancient writers supposed the great fertility of this neighbourhood to have 
' See Wotton's "Short View," &c., G. Shelton, p. 136. 



1 6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

depended. ' This shire being situated more eastward than diverse shires of this 
realme saluteth the gladsome spring, visiting these parts somewhat more tymely than 
in other western parts ; entertaineth the welcome summer, which with a most mild 
course lovingly nourisheth and kindly ripeneth all sorts of fruit to the end that the 
joyful harvest and collection of the earth's benefits may be in the best and fittest 
time, which is ordinarily finished some three weeks before St. Michael, unlesse some 
late years fall out. The winter, though it be often sharpe and enduring, yet is never 
so violent and stormy as in other places, by reason whereof all things bear the full 
of their natural and timely growth without any lett or hindrance of the same.' " ' 

One main stream or river passes through Buxhall. It rises in the neighbour- 
hood of Gedding, flows through Rattlesden, Buxhall, and Finborough on to Stow- 
market. It was formerly known as the Erewell or Orwell 2 — a name which has 
since been appropriated to it after its junction with the Gipping below Stowmarket. 
The stream or rivulet, for it is little more, is of interest as having at one time been 
actually navigable from Ipswich. As far back as the Norman Conquest this stream 
was navigable for small vessels up to near Rattlesden, and much of the stone used 
in building the Abbey at Bury by Baldwin, the Abbot who died in 1097, was 
brought from Caen in Normandy to Ipswich, and thence by this river to Rattles- 
den, where it was landed and taken to Bury. The stream runs along a 
winding, marshy valley, about five miles in length, which connects Rattlesden with 
Stow. A little eastward, beyond Stowmarket, the Rattlesden stream meets the 
Gipping, and together they flow on to Ipswich. The fact of the Caen stone being 
brought by water to Rattlesden is mentioned by Lydgate, the well-known monk 
of Bury, who chronicled all the events of his own time and those preceding. 
He says : — 3 

" In scync and twentyc wynters ye may seen 

A ncwe churche he dyd edifyc, 

Ston brought from Kane out of Normandye 

By the se, and set up on the strande 

At Ratlysdene, and carried forth be lande." 



■ Rcyce's Brev. Jermyn MS., Brit. Mus. 8200, cited Hollingsworth's " History of Stowmarket," p. 155. 

= See Inquisition at Ipswich, 5 Edw. III., Bacon's "Annals of Ipswich," p. 65. 

3 MS. Brit. Mus., cited by Hollingsworth. In 1790 this stream between Stowmarket and Ipswich 
was made navigable for barges. It must be remembered that the former town stands 120 feet above 
the latter. Bury being 100 feet more above Stowmarket. The Act by which the communication by 
water was effected is the 30 Geo. III., c. 57, which constituted William Woollaston of Great 
Finborough, John Wenyeve of Brettenham, Joshua Grigby the younger, of Drinkstone, Robert Walpole of 
Beighton, Esquires ; Henry Hill of Buxhall and Henry Jackson Close of Hitcham, Clerks, and their 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 17 

The stream from Rattlesden as it passes through Buxhall is augmented by one 
sometimes known as the Bret, which flows from Fasbourn Hall, passes the Valley 
Farm, and winds prettily round the lower meadows of the Buxhall estate, dividing 
in some measure the parishes of Buxhall and Great Finborough. South of the 
course of the Orwell, and in the midst of the meadows just referred to are some 
exceedingly fine and very ancient fish-ponds, formed by a tiny affluent and main- 
tained by sluices. The Buxhall river yields some good fish, such, for instance, 
as the plaice {Lleden freck), the perch (Perc), the pike (Tenkwyad), the roach 
{Rlyfell), the dace {Darsen golenbysg), the tench [Gwrachen, hgretten), the eel 
(Llysowen). Pike have been taken at ^2\ lbs., but small pike are, of course, more 
common. Perch and roach weighing 4 or 5 lbs., and eels of 5 lbs. and more, have 
been caught in the Buxhall stream. 

Fine views may be had from the Buxhall hills, for the surface of the 
ground throughout the parish is diversified with those gentle inequalities so pleasing 
to the eye. One of the most charming views can be obtained from the Malt 
House which stands on a prominent ridge and lays under tribute some of the 
most delightful scenery in the neighbourhood. 

The parish rejoices in the possession of some relics of antiquity — for instance, 
stocks, and is also comforted by the presence of a Dovecote, a Mill, and a Pound. 
Kitchin in his " Le Courte Leete " says that " every place that belongeth to the 
View of Frank-pledge, ought to have pillory and tumbrel to execute justice. 
And also in every town where there is a leet there shall be stocks, and for the 
lack of these the town shall forfeit 5/., and it is inquirable." The view of 
Frankpledge belonged to the Manor of Buxhall, or perhaps, rather, the lord of 
the manor had the franchise of view of Frankpledge, and therefore Buxhall 
should have had, according to Kitchin, pillory and tumbrel or the ducking-stool ; 
but we have not met with these in the village or heard of their existence in 
modern times. 

The Stocks were of iron, and were fixed until a few years ago to the sign- 
post standing at the junction of the Finborough to Rattlesden road and that 
leading to Brettenham. They were taken down when the last new signpost was 

successors, Trustees of the undertaking. Between Stowmarket and Ipswich there were fifteen locks, and 
the concern answered the expectations of the promoters, and was a financial success until the Eastern 
Counties, now the Great Eastern, Railway leased the concern for thirty-five years, and on the expiration 
of the lease declined to renew. The river has now fallen into disuse, and it is some years since any 
barge has come up so far as Stowmarket. 

4 



1 8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

put up, and were recently in the possession of the late Rector of the parish. We 
meet in the Court Rolls with many references to these stocks. They were 
frequently requiring repair, which the Court decreed the inhabitants of the parish 
to effect under penalty. It does not appear, however, that they were extensively 
used, Buxhall apparently being a sober and godly parish, for many of the entries in 
the Court Rolls have a prefix to the requirement upon the parishioners to repair to 
the effect that the stocks had " fallen into decay." The Dovecote was, as is well 
known, a constant appendant, like a mill, to a manor, and the Buxhall Dovecote 
stands in a meadow part of the glebe not far from the Church and adjoining the 
Rectory garden — no doubt by reason of the fact that until recently the advowson 
was appurtenant to the manor. The Pound was formerly on the site now occupied 
by what is known as the Pound House or Cottage between the Church and the 
Valley Farm. A common pound belongs to a township, lordship, or village, and 
ought to be in every parish kept in repair by those who have done the repair 
time out of mind. The pound overt, or open pound, is usually on the lord's waste, 
being provided for the use of himself and his tenants. Where this is the case it 
is called " the lord's pound," and has all the privileges of a common pound. For 
instance, if cattle are kept in the lord's pound no notice is necessary to the 
owners to feed them ; but if put in any other open place notice has to be 
given. 

There are some interesting notices of the Pound in the Court Rolls. In 1607 
Sir John Gilbert, one of the free tenants of the Manor, who lived at Finborough 
Hall, seems to have resisted the impounding of some of his horses. This is 
recorded in a Court held September 30th, 5 Jac. I., 1607 : — 

" The Jurors say upon their oath that five geldings of Sir John Gilberd 
knight and Sir William Forth Knight in Buxhall aforesaid some time since were 
taken by certain John Margerim and William Sowgate doing damage within the 
precincts of this manor and therefore within the park of the lord of this 
manor in Buxhall aforesaid were impounded until a certain John Marshe servant 
of the said John Gilberd against the laws of this Kingdom of England, about 
the twentieth day of this instant month of September, broke into the pound 
aforesaid, and those geldings from thence then took and carried away. 

"The said John Gilberd and WiUiam Forth or either of them making no 
satisfaction as yet for the damage aforesaid." 

The mill stands on the same site on which a mill is recorded as standing in 
the Domesday Survey, and its lofty wings may continuously be seen sweeping 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 19 

through the air with stately .majesty. There is an entry in the Court Rolls of 
the time of Edward VI. as to the Mill and the property immediately adjoining : — 



"8 APRIL 5 EDWARD VJ. 

" At this court the lord as well to the fulfilling and performing of certain 
bargains and sales between him and a certain William Bert before made as in 
certain Indentures between them made bearing date the xv day of February now 
last past it doth appear, as of other covenants and agreements between them had 
covenanted and agreed before divers worthy persons in the aforesaid Indentures by 
name specified, granted out of his hands to the aforesaid William Berte all that his 
windmill with the houses and ponds to the said mill adjoining with all the rights 
appurtenances and equipments to the said mill in whatsoever manner belonging 
or appertaining and also one cottage and xviij acres of land lying more or less 
near to the mill aforesaid and to the said mill belonging as lying between the 
field of the lord called Melfelde now in farm of Henry Richardes on the east 
and the land of the lord in the bond tenure of Robert Osborne on the west, 
abutting towards the north upon ' le mell strette ' and towards the south upon the 
Street leading towards the scite of the manor of Lefey, to hold to the aforesaid 
William Berte his heirs and assigns of the lord by the rod at the will of the 
lord according to the custom of the manor from the feast of St. Michael the 
Archangel next ensuing upon condition however that the aforesaid William his 
heirs executors and assigns well and faithfully shall fulfil and observe all the 
covenants articles and agreements in the aforesaid Indentures specified which on 
[the behalf] of the said William are to be fulfilled and observed. And further 
upon condition that neither the aforesaid William nor his heirs or assigns 
henceforth shall let alienate or sell any parcel of the premises by itself, but 
may let' sell or alienate the said mill and all and singular the premises at once 
and in the whole and not otherwise, so that no separation be thereof made 
and he shall give to the lord of fine after the death of tenants or for making 
alienation thereof only xxvj'' viij'', rendering therefor yearly xxvj** viij'' and he 
does suit at the General Court, to wir: from three weeks to three weeks and other 
services therein due and he did fealty." 

The Mill, as also Millfield, twenty-six acres, was included in the Copinger 
family settlement of October 7, 1647. 

In days gone by Buxhall had, as all proper villages ought to have, a green. 



20 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

This was anciently known as Buxhall Tye. It is part of the lord's demesne, 
and the Court Rolls are very particular in specifying that it belongs exclusively to 
the lord. Thus we find at a Court held September 30th, i Mary, " that John 
Richar made trespass upon the separate soil of the lord called ' le Tye ' in 
Buxhall with a horse depastured there. Therefore in mercy iij'' and it is 
commanded to him no more so to do under penalty of xx''." And again : " That 
Thomas Harlyng likewise made trespass upon the said separate soil of the lord called 
' le Tye ' with a horse depastured there. Therefore in mercy iij'' and it is 
commanded to him no more so to do under penalty of xij''." 

Both Richar and Harlyng were fined at the same Court, and therefore it is 
somewhat strange that the penalty for a future offence should In the one case be 
2od. and in the other only I2d. 

Later the Rector was fined for a like offence, for at another Court we find the 
following entry : " Also they [the jurors] say that Henry Todd Rector of the parish 
church of Buxall depastured the separate lands of the lord of this manor called 
' le Tye ' with his pigs and geese in trampling on and consuming the grass of the 
said lord. Therefore he is in mercy, &c. [he was fined iiij''], and it is commanded 
to him not to do so henceforth under penalty as above." At a Court, 
October 7th, 14 Eliz., it was presented "that Henry Sowgate and Thomas Salter 
unjustly dug up and took flagges in the separate soil of the lady called the Tye 
near the cemetary there to repair the common metes without leave. Therefore 
each of them in mercy iiij''. And further they are commanded that henceforth they 
do not commit the like default under penalty that each of them who in that behalf 
offends shall forfeit to the lady iij' iiij''." 

In the 1 2th year of Elizabeth a licence was granted to Daniel Richer of a way 
over the Green. This was at a Court held April i8th, and the entry is: "To 
this Court comes Daniel Richer and prays leave of the lord ' to drive or lede ' his 
cattle upon the separate soil of the lord called ' le Tye ' land parcel of the scite 
of the manor and the several road parcel of Melfeld as often as it shall please him, 
and to him it is granted upon the following condition, namely that a driver shall 
always • drive or lede the same cattell over the seyd groundes and the same Cattell 
not to lye in the same waye and to paye to the lord fowre Capons yerelye for the 
yerely forme of the weye to drive or lede over the same in forme aforseid and the 
said Capons to be paid quarterlye videlt : at Mydesomer Michaelmas Christmas 

■ The words following are in English. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 21 

and the Annunciation of oure Ladye, at every of the said feastes one Capone at 
the mancion howse of the lord called Fasbournes in Buxall, and for any defalt 
to be made in payment yerelye of the seyd Capons the seyd graunt of the seyd 
weye to be voyde." At the Court, April 14th, 26 Elizabeth, a bit of the green 
was allowed to Henry Sowgate for a cottage. The entry is : " At this Court the 
lord in person in Court of his own special grace and for divers causes and 
considerations him thereunto specially moving granted out of his hand to a certain 
Henry Sowgate half a rod of land parcel of the Demesne of this manor called 
Tye green now separated by a hedge and ditch in Buxhall aforesaid with one 
Cottage newly built. And in full Court to him freely gave seisin by the rod to 
have and to hold the same unto the same Henry his heirs and assigns of the lord 
by the rod at the will of the lord according to the custom of the Manor at the 
yearly rent of la'' to the lord and other services and suit of Court," &c. 

In the first year of Jac. I. we find that the Rector of Buxhall was presented 
for playing bowls on this green. The entry is quaint, and we give it as it stands 
in the Rolls October 6th, " Cum p statut' in parliamento anno 33 Hen. VIII. c. 9 
enactitat' fuit ut Anglicanis verbis sequnt' videlt' that noe manner of parson shall 
at any tyme playe at any bowle or bowles in open places out of his garden or 
orchard vnder the payne to forfeite for every tyme soe ofFendinge vj"* viij'' pnt 
in eodem statuto continet' Juratores p'dict psentant vltim' sup eorum sacrm q'd 
Georgius Dickenson dicus Johanes Jackson gen' Edwardus Studd Georgius Bemysh 
Ricardus Gilbard and Johanes Salter filius Johanes Salter seniorib' sup locum apperit 
in Buxhall p'dict vocat' Buxhall grene infra p'cinct huius lete diu'sa tempora hec 
anno ludebant et quibibt eorum ludebat cum globis anglice with bowles con't 
forman statut' p'dict." 

The Rev. George Dickenson was an old offender in this respect, for on the 
14th of April, 26 Eliz., he and Robert Copinger had been fined for playing bowls 
within the precincts of the Leet. 

An investigation was made in 1619 of the early Rolls as to the rights of the 
lord of the manor not only to the green, but as to the wastes of the manor, and 
the record is on the Rolls of the Court, held that year June ist : "Ad banc Cur' 
p'sentat est etiani per tot homagin p'dict' ut eidem homag' per diu'sos Rotlos 
Cur'huilis man'ii in ista cur' in evidenc' ostend' per manifeste apparet : videlt Rotlos 
de 39. 32. 30. et 27 Edw. 3. Rot, de 14 R. 2, Rot. de 4 Henr' 7. Rot. de 23 
et 26 Henr' 6 Rot. de 4. 2, 2, et 3 et 5 Phi. and Marie Rot. de 12, 14 and 35, 
Elizabeth, qd quedam pec' pasture iacen' prope et ex appoit' eccl'ie de Buxhall modo 



22 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

vocat' Buxhall greene ex antique vocat' Buxhall tye et strat ex appoit' campis vocat 
millfeildes in Buxhall p'dict sunt et ex antique fuer' sep'ati soli et terr' lib'e dm 
huius manij et q'd nullus debet habere comvn' ibm cum overijs suis sine licentia 
dict'dm. p'sentant etiam homagm p'dict q'd omnes terr' vast' et comvn' anglice that 
all the waste growndes and comons infra p'cinct huius manij sunt comvnes et 
p'r' soli dm diet' man'ij : quas quidem p'sentaciones idem dn's mandat in Rotlis 
huius Cur' Jrrotlari," &c. 

The Green is about the centre of the parish, and in old time was, no doubt, 
the resort and delight of old and young, and a place for the gathering of the 
villagers on the summer evenings when the labour of the day was over — a spot 
where in days when reading was less common and newspapers rarely seen, the elders 
would converse and discuss the passing events in the busy world or current in their 
own more limited sphere, while the younger played and frolicked or danced before 
them. 

" How often have I blest the coming day, 
When toil remitting lent its turn to play, 
And all the village train, from labour free, 
Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree ! 
While many a pastime circled in the shade, 
The young contending, as the old surveyed ; 
And many a gambol frolicked o'er the ground, 
And sleights of art, and feats of strength went round ; 
And still, as each repeated pleasure tired, 
Succeeding sports the mirthful band inspired. 
The dancing pair that simply sought renown. 
By holding out to tire each other down ; 
The swain mistrustless of his smutted face, 
While secret laughter tittered round the place ; 
The bashful virgin's sidelong looks of love ; 
The matron's glance, that would those looks reprove ; 
These were thy charms, sweet village ! Sports like these. 
With sweet succession taught e'en toil to please ; 
These round thy bowers their cheerful influence shed. 
These were thy charms — but all these charms are fled." 

Some writers of recent years have represented the lot of the English villager 
in past times as a hard one, but the representation seems hardly justified by the 
facts. Great stress has been laid on the scanty amount of wages, while what he 
usually received in addition to wages, and the fact that the wages received went 
so much further in former days than now, if not actually overlooked, have not been 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 23 

given sufficient weight to. Again, in days gone by a large amount of gaiety 
savoured the lives of our villagers. What have we now to compare with the 
sports and pastimes of the old village folic.'' Where the May-day festivities, the 
harvest suppers, the fairs, the " ales," and other jovial gatherings ? Village Ufe in 
past days was certainly not devoid of opportunities of enjoyment and recreation, 
and old social customs afforded diversity to the rustics of ancient days. Rarely do 
we now find village games and sports, except some energetic Rector or Curate 
inaugurates a cricket or a football club, or a club for bowls or quoits. Formerly 
every season of the year furnished its quota of gaiety in the way of holiday 
customs, many attended with quaint observances ; now the villager has to seek 
his enjoyment in the towns surrounding, or rest at home in dreary dulness. The 
change is not for the better, and there can be no doubt that everything tending 
to sweeten existence extracted from the life of the agricultural labourer is indirectly 
a loss to the whole community. 

A writer has justly observed : " The social customs which formerly existed in 
each village, the sports and pastimes associated with the village green, the May Day 
festivals, and the Christmas carollings, were of great value, inasmuch as they tended 
to infuse some poetical feeling into the minds of the people, softened the rudeness 
of rustic manners, and gave the villagers simple pleasures which lightened their 
labours. They- prevented them from growing hard, grasping, and discontented with 
their lot. They promoted good feeling between the farmers and their labourers. 
The customs of the town were a poor exchange for the ancient country manners 
and amusements : and it was a sad day for our country when the villagers lost 
their simplicity and the power of appreciating the primitive pleasures of rural 
England." 

Buxhall suffered with the rest of East Anglia in early days from the incursions 
of the Danes — particularly as being a parish through which a river navigable from 
the sea to Rattlesden ran. It accordingly, more readily than more remote villages, 
paid the Dane Gelt, or the Danish levy imposed on the county for defensive 
operations. The amount of this tax is stated to have been in the following 
proportions in the hundred of Stow: Thornai or Stowmarket, ifd. ; Combs, jyd. ; 
Buxhall, 25d. ; Creeting, 3od. ; Haughley, lyd. ; Newton and Dagworth, 3od. ; 
Wetherden, 25d. ; Torstun, lod. ; Thorpe, 8d. ; Chilton hamlet, 8d. ; Onehouse, 
6jd. The value of each silver penny as compared with money in these days may 
be taken to be about five shillings. The yearly tax on the hundred for protection 
against the Northerners would work out something like the following : — 



24 History of the Parish of Buxhall 



L 


S. 


d. 


3 


15 





9 


5 





6 


5 





7 


10 





4 


5 





7 


10 





6 


5 





2 


10 





2 








2 








I 


10 


6 


52 


15 


6 



Thorney 

Combs 

Buxhall 

Greeting 

Haughley. 

Newton and Dagworth ... 

Wetherden 

Torstun ... 

Thorpe ... 

Chilton 

Onehouse... 

Total 



In Saxon times, and inmiediately before the Norman Conquest, Ingelric, the 
proprietor of Finborough, held land in Buxhall, and Leswin Croc, another Saxon, 
had a good estate there. These holdings, however, formed but a small portion of 
the parish. The estate of Ingelric, by a grant of William the Conqueror to Count 
Eustace, passed from Saxon hands to Norman, and Croc's estate passed to Roger 
Pictaviensis. Frodo, brother of Baldwin, Abbot of Bury St. Edmunds, had also 
a considerable holding in the parish after the Norman invasion. At the time of 
the Conquest, as we learn from Domesday Book and other sources, Buxhall was 
estimated to be three miles long and two broad, and in it there were 40 free- 
holders (liberati homines), 3 slaves (servi), 19 cottagers {bordarii), 3 farmers {socmanni), 
2 bondmaids (ancilia), 41 acres meadow {ac. parati), 815 acres' arable {carucat^e 
terra), 107 acres doubtful (acri), 15 ploughs of oxen {carucct bovuni), half a mill 
{mold), 57 hogs {forci),~ 94 sheep {oves), 1 1 she-goats {capVce), 2 oxen belonging to 
to the men {boves hominum), and the Church of Buxhall is stated to be endowed 
with 30 acres of land. Mr. Hollingsworth is somewhat facetious over the boves 
hominum or men-oxen, as he terms them, of Buxhall. " What," he says, " can the 

' It must be reraerabercd that the number of acres is by computation only, for it was not till 
31 Edward I. that the quantity of an acre was settled by law; and this is the reason that in this 
survey the village is represented as containing so small a number of acres. 

^ There are three kinds of hogs mentioned in Domesday — hogs of pasture turned out in the day 
and brought in at night by the swineherd ; hogs of herbage fed in styes ; and wild hogs. The hogs 
here mentioned as in Buxhall are wild hogs or hogs of the wood, sometimes hunted for amusement. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 25 

good people there have meant by these beasts ? They are only once or twice men- 
tioned in Suffolk elsewhere. Can they have been trained to the saddle, and did 
they thus take a ride for pleasure, or attend a hunt on their oxen ? I rather 
think this is the meaning of the term, and from its rarity that this was their em- 
ployment ? If so, the experiment did not succeed in displacing horses. They may 
have been trained to carry a litter for the great man's lady there, and this is an easy 
solution of the difficulty." The more probable explanation seem to be either that 
they were oxen belonging to the men, or men who drew the plough. 

The following is a translation of the entries in Domesday Book relating to the 
Parish :— 

LAND OF EARL EUSTACE. 

In Buxhall Ingelric held i carucate and a half of land. Always 7 bordars. 
Always 2 plough-teams in demesne. And 2 sochemen with 4 acres. And 8 acres of 
meadow. And i head of cattle. Then 30 sheep, now 40. Now 1 1 goats. Then 
and later valued at 40 shillings, now at 4 pounds. 

LANDS OF ROGER BIGOT. 

In Buxhall a freeman under Saint Etheldreda in King Edward's time by 
commendation only in the (soc) jurisdiction of the hundred held 40 acres of land. 
Then and later i plough-team, now none. And 5 acres of meadow. Then and 
later valued at 20 shillings, now at 10. This (land) Roger received to make up 
the value of Baylham in another hundred. But the hundred never saw either writ 
or livery. 

LANDS OF ROGER DE POICTOU. 

Buxhall Leswin Croc held in King Edward's time 2 carucates of land. Always 4 
bordars. Then 3 bondsmen, later and now none. Always 2 plough-teams in demesne. 
And 16 acres of meadow. Then half a mill." Then 2 carthorses. One head of 
cattle. Then 53 hogs, now 16. Then 28 sheep, now 30. A church with 30 
acres, and half an acre of meadow. Always valued at 60 shilhngs. He (Leswin 
Croc) had the soc and sac over the Hall and the bordars. And there were 7 
freemen and a half under the said (Leswin) by commendation only in King Edward's 

' The expression, " half a mill," may sound strange in the ears of some. It merely indicates that 
the mill was kept by more than one proprietor. The mill in the present case was probably owned 
and kept in repair by two proprietors at least for the convenience of their families and tenants. 

5 



2 6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

time. The soc was in the hundred. And they had 37 acres. Then 2 plough- 
teams, later and now half a team. And i acre of meadow. Always valued at 10 
shillings. And to this manor Norman, son of Tanred, added 3 freemen under the 
King by commendation and soc with 24 acres.' Then and later i plough-team, 
now a team of 2 oxen. And valued at 4od. 

LANDS OF FRODO, THE ABBOt's BROTHER. 

In Buxhall 25 freemen held 3 carucates of land and a half in the King's soc 
who (with their lands) were delivered to Frodo as a manor (containing) 3 carucates 
of land and a half. Always 5 bordars and a half. And in King Edward's time 
and later 7 plough-teams among them all, now 2 in demesne, and 3 of the vassals. 
And 10 acres of meadow. Then 2 carthorses, now i. Always 6 head of cattle. 
Now 22 hogs. Now 36 sheep. Then and later valued at 60 shillings, now at 
100 shillings. It is a mile and a half and one mile broad. And whosoever holds 
there pays 2 5d. in gelt. The King and the Earl have the soc. 



LANDS OF SAINT ETHELDREDA. 

In Buxhall (are) i socheman with 10 acres of forfeited land, ai;d i bordar 
with 5 acres. Valued at lod. 

LANDS OF WILLIAM DE WARENA. 

In Buxhall — Humfrey is tenant — Monulf the priest a (free) - man, by 
commendation under Saint Etheldreda in the King's soc (was tenant). And there 
was half a carucate of land and 30 acres. Now William holds by reason of the 
Lewes exchange. Then and later 2 bordars, now 7. Then and always i plough- 
team in demesne. Always 2 oxen belonging to the men. And 2 acres of meadow. 
In the same township 4 freemen under the said Monulf by commendation held 2 
acres. Valued at 12 shillings. 

The lands of Roger de Poictou form the present Manor of Buxhall with part 
of the lands of Frodo. Another part of Frodo's lands compose the Manor of Fenn 



' Mr. Hollingsworth, ever ready with an explanation, says "most probably he took them from his 
neighbours." Quite possible, but the difficulty is not to discover how he obtained, but with what object 
the so-called addition to the manor was made, seeing that no son of Tanred appears to have been seised 
at any time of any one of the four manors in the Parish of Buxhall. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 27 

Hall, while the lands of Earl Eustace are those of Cockerells Hall, and those of 
William de Warena LefFey Manor. 

The Honor of Lancaster held, according to the Ipswich Great Domesday 
(Bk. VI.), one knight's fee in Buxhall and two knights' fees in Finborough. 
What the exact amount of the knight's fee, or feodum militare, was is doubtful. 
Generally it was so much land of inheritance as was regarded as sufficient 
to maintain a knight with suitable revenue, the value of which in the time of 
Henry III. was reckoned at ^15 per annum. By some it is supposed to have 
contained 8 carucates, or 680 acres, though some contained 800 acres. Dr. Cowel 
states that 5 hides made a knight's fee, 4 virgates a hide, and 24 acres a virgate, 
and consequently a knight's fee would be 480 acres. According to Blackstone the 
measure of a knight's fee in 3 Edward I. was estimated at twelve ploughlands. Selden 
denies that the knight's fee was a fixed amount of land, and contends that it was 
so much as the king was pleased to grant upon the condition of having the service 
of one knight. For every knight's fee, the knight was bound to attend the king 
in his wars for forty days in the year. Selden was not far wrong, and it may be 
taken for granted that the knight's fee was determined rather by rent and valuation 
(that held by an under-tenant consisting usually of an estate worth l^o z year) than 
any particular acreage, and certainly was not based on the " five hides " of the 
Anglo-Saxon system. 

The following are extracts from Records relating to land in Buxhall of an 
early date : — 

In iioi Godfrid, the son of Ellwand and his wife, gave to God and St. John 
of Stoke the tenth of Buxhall. In this gift his sons joined and confirmed the deed, 
for without this assent of the children as well as the permission of the king such 
gifts were not legal in those days. 

Rich. I. Magna assia int' Emmam de Cantelon et Adam Cokerell de terra de 
Bukeshall ponitur in respectum, &c.' 
Feoda honoris Bonon. Emma de Cantelon ij mil' in Smepetun' cum quodam membro 

de Pebeners in Essex', et Fineberg' et Buckesal' in SufF.^ 
Adam de Geddinge tenet quondam {sic) in Buckeshale qui fuit Eschaet' tempore 
Henr' Reg. patris Domine Reg' et prasfatus H. dedit eam Domuj 
de Buttele et praefatus Adam tenet eam de domo de Buttele ad 
feod' firmam pro v marc'. 3 
• Abbreviatio Placitorum, Rol. 15. - Testa de Nevill, 273^ 3 Uhl, 295'. 



2 8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Feoda milit' in com' SufF' de quibus dii's Rex p'cipit scutagia cont' tnsfretac'oem 
suam i' Vascon'. Feodo de hoiiore de Lancastr'. Rogerus le 
Esturmi de Ikene tenet unum feod' in Bukeshal' de eodem honore.i 
Wiilelmus le Esturmi tenet feoda ij milit' in Buckeshall' et in Ykene unde ante- 
cessores sui solebant facere servitium iij Milit' sed H. Rex pat' 
Domini Reg' condonavit servic' unlus Milit' pro quadam piscar' in 
Oreford' quam Dominus Rex manu sua tenet. - 
/. Henr. III. In the Abbreviatio Rotulorum Originalium. — SufF'. Wiilelmus Esturmy 
fir et heres Rogeri Esturmy fee' R. fidelitatem de omnibus terris et 
tenementis que prasdictus Rogerus pat' suus tenuit de R. in capite. 
Ro. 4. " Karled' R. reddit Henr' Esturmy fil' et heredi Galfr' 
Esturmy totam ballivam quam idem Galfr' tenuit in ffor' de Savernak." 
Ro. 4. 
9 Hen. III. Rot. Pip. Scutagium de Muntgomery assess, ad ij marc. Will. 
Esturmi de let. iiij marc' de ij feod' que recognovit, et ij marc, de 
j. f. que non recognovit que tria feoda sunt in Botehall et Ikene 
in SufF'. 3 
28 Hen. III. Magister Radus de Rakelm, Bukkeshale, Heckham, et Breckenham 
libr' warren. 

William de Amaville and Micholdis, his wife gave two acres in 
Finebroge and a tenement in Buxhesale to the Abbey of St. John's 
Church, Colchester. 
38 Hen. III. n. 23. Roger Esturmy, Buxhall Manor.4 
I Edw. I. Adam fil' Roberti de Alneto dat per cartam suam Thome de 
Weyland Margarie uxori ejus et Ricardo filio suo omnes terras, &c., 
quE ei accederent post mortem Edwardi fratris sui in Onhus, 
Ratlesden, Buckeshale et Wetherden habendum hered' dicti Ricardi 
quas dedit in excambio pro terris in Herthurst, Lansele et Brockelegh 
p. ut patet in carta excambii in hoc rotulo. contenta.5 
Item, Adam dat Alicias qua; fuit ux' Gilberti de Cotenham i mess' 
et omnia ten' &c., que accider' jure hereditario post mortem Edwardi 
fratis sui in Onhus, Ratlesden, Bucheshale et Wetherden habendum 
sibi et hered' suis.6 

' Testa dc Ncvill, 291. = Ibia., 295. 

3 Harl. MSS., 971, 70. 4 Cal. Inquis. p. ni., vol. i. p. 12. 

5 Abbreviatio Placitorum, Rol. 30. « Ibid. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 29 

I Edw. I. In the Patent Rolls of this date we find the following : — 

Appointment of Master R. de Seyton' to take the assize of novel 
disseisin arraigned by the abbat of Ramsey against Robert de Bradefeld 
and John his son, touching a tenement in Buxhall (Baus/iull) ; and 
8 Edw. I. Appointment of Roger Loveday and Robert de Ludham to take the 
assize of novel disseisin arraigned by Alan de Mutford against John 
de Gedding and others, touching a tenement in Buxhall (Bukesal). 

18 Edw. I. Margeria uxor Tho. de Weyland, qui adjuravit regnum pro felonia 
et Ricardus fil' ejus conjunctim tenent un' mess' 42 acr' 
terrae 4 acr. bos. 12 acr. pastur. 4 acr. forat. 3.?. 8^. redd, in Boxalle 
et Finebergh.i Rog' Com. de Clara confirmat mon' de Stoke inter 
al. ex dona Galfri' fil' Hamais et Ausgoti de Bukeshalla (Reg. de 
Stoke, p. 8, fol. 24), Decimi prascipiend' in villa de Buckeshall 
specificati {Uid., p. 37, fol. 71). 

33 Edw. I. Robertus Bardolf et Lora uxor ejus. Buxale et ali' in com. Suff'.^ 
6 Edw. II. Ingham Belet et Lora uxor ejus Buxhale un' mess' iiij ac' terr' 54a. 
terr' 7 ac. bos., &c.3 

17 Edw. II. Adomarus de Valencia Comes Pembroc' et Maria uxor ejus Buxhall 
dimid' feod' pertin' ad Kentwell Maner' Suff'.4 

1 Edw. III. Thomas Comes de Lancastr'. Feoda militum dicti comitis. Iken et 

Buckshalle 2 feod' pro. Wm. Sturmyn.5 

2 Edw. III. John Payte, et Dom. de Buxhall terr.' un. feod. mil' in Buxhall de 

Due. Lancastr. 
I Rich. II. Maria de Sancte Paulo comitiss' Pembroc'. Buxhall dimid' feod'. 
14 Rich. II. David Strabolgi comes Athol'. Feoda. Buxhall dimid' feod' per 
William Tendringe. 

The Following are Extracts from the Feet of Fines, John to 
Edward iv. relating to Buxhall. 

16 Edw. I. 25. Thomas de Weylaund and Margaret his wife and Richard their 
son v. Agnes del Punt in Buxhale and Fynebergh. 

' Sparrow MSS. 

= Cal. Inquis. post mortem, i. 96. These other places were Shclland, Elmswell, Haughlcy, 
Finborough, and certain tenements in Rattlesden. 

3 liU., p. 249. Other lands were in Shelland and one messuage and 120 acres in Elmswell. 

4 Cal. Inquis. p. m., i. 316. = li''^-, "• 9- 



30 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

2 1 Edw. 1. 19. Geoffrey son of Lawrence Esturmy v. Geoffrey de Geddyng and 

Margaret his wife in Buxhale. 
33 Edw. I. 31. Robert de Geddingg of Buxhale and Eufemia his wife v. Robert le 

Warde of Geddyng and Dionisia his wife in Buxhale. 
9 Edw. II. 36. Robert Cokerel v. Adam de Ponte of Laxfeld in Buxhale (Robert 

and Thomas sons of Guide Cokerel appoii clafii). 
II Edw. II. 14. John de Aldeby and Cristiana his wife v. Robert le Heyward of 

Boxstede and Alice daughter of William le ■ Bretoun of Buxhale, 

Boxstede, Somerton, and Glemesford. 
7 Edw. III. II. Richard de Ikene, parson of the church of Ratlesden and Richard 

son of William de Bouk of Melton v. John son of Simon de 

Ratlesden in Ratlesden, Buxhale, Felsham, Geddyngg, Ryngishele, 

and Cretyngg. 
18 Edw. III. 23. Henry Thurmod v. Peter de Alkwyk and John le Spencer in 

Ratlesden, Hecham, Brethenham and Buxhale. 
30 Edw. III. 20. William Germye, chevalier, and Isabella his wife v. Geoffrey 

Faussebroun, parson of Buxhale church, and Thomas Cat, parson 

of Mosec (?) church, in Capele, Bergholt, Benteleye, Copedok, 

Little Brenham, and Brenham Combusta. 
30 Edw. III. 23. Roger Sturmyn v. John de Denham and Matilda his wife in 

Buxhale and Magna Fynberghwe, which Richard Walkefare, 

chevalier, held for life. 
34 Edw. III. 8. Robert de Bures, chevalier, Richard Bakere of Wykhambrook, 

Richard Bresete, Geoffrey Fausebroun, parson of Buxhale church, 

Thomas Cat, parson of Okholt church, and John de Cakestrete 

of Fynbergh v. Thomas de Felton and Johanna his wife of the 

manor of Oldeneuton in Oldeneuton. 
40 Edw. III. 29. Simon Badele and Richard Wylde v. John Ruly and Margaret his 

wife of the manor of Buxhale with appurtenances in Buxhale. 
40 Edw. III. 31. Simon de Badele and John Austyn v. John de Ruly and Margaret 
his wife of the manor of Buxhale with appurtenances. 

7 Rich. II. 35. William Copenger, chaplain, Roger Copenger, John Copenger, and 

Semanus Bretoun v. John Ruly and Margaret his wife in Buxhall. 

8 Rich. II. 18. Isabella de Hedersete v. John Ruyley and Margaret his wife, of 

the manor of Buxhall with appurtenances in Buxhall and advowson 
of Buxhall church. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 31 

12 Rich. II. 4. Robert Folke v. Roger Corde and Cristiana his wife in Buxhale. 
17 Rich. II. 21. Robert Aldewyk and John Aldewyk v. Peter Aldewyk, of Ratlesden, 

and Johanna his wife in Shellone, Haule, Wetherden, Harleston, 

Buxhale, Carleton, Woolpit, and Onhous. 
3 Hen. IV. 25. John Copangar and John Spetelnian, tailor v. John Grene and 

Johanna his wife in Blaxhale {sic). 
10 Hen. IV. 5. John Sprot, John Copynger, John Neketon, and John Buntyng v. 

John Frebrygge of Dedham and Margaret his wife in Buxhale. 
20 Edw. IV. 16. John Tymperley, senior -y. John Ive and Alice his wife and John 

Colby and Isabella his wife, daughter of John Ive and Alice of 

the Manor of Boyton in Fynbergh magna, Combys, Onehous, 

Stowemarket, Hecham, Buxhale, and Felsham. 

The Parish of Buxhall, which includes the four Manors of Buxhall, Cockerells 
Hall, Leffey Hall, and Fenn Hall, was the estate of Roger Sturmy, Robert Cockerell, 
Richard Weyland, and John Tendring, 9 Edward I. Sturmy was Lord of Buxhall 
Manor, Cockerell of Cockerells Hall, and the other two, Weyland and Tendring, of 
Fenn Hall and Leffey Hall. Subsequently LefFey Hall became the property of 
Bartholomew, Lord Berghersh, who 23 Edward III. obtained a charter of Free 
Warren to himself and Cicely his wife, and their heirs, in all his demesne lands in 
this place, and divers others in this county and Norfolk. He left it so privileged 
to his daughter and heiress Elizabeth, wife of Edward de Spencer. He was not 
at any time seised of the Manor of Buxhall itself 

Blomefield in his History of Norfolk, says : " Sir Robert Houghton, Knt., Sergeant- 
at-Iaw, and one of the Justices of the King's Bench, died seised of the Manors of 
Leffey, Buxhall, Brettenham, and Hecham in Suffolk and other cities, leaving Francis 
his son and heir, thirty years old, who died 1629, leaving his son and heir six years old, 
who entailed the said manors." Sir Robert Houghton, however, never was seised 
of the Manor of Buxhall, and it is evident Blomefield has made an error in transcrip- 
tion. He should have said, " Leffey in Buxhall." Sir Robert Houghton was in fact 
a free tenant in respect of certain premises of the Manor of Buxhall, and could not 
therefore have been its lord. Besides which he was, court after court, fined for not 
putting in an appearance, as the Court Rolls abundantly testify. 

Buxhall must have been an important centre in the time of the early Edwards, 
six centuries since, when the knightly family of Sturmy reigned at the parish 
Manor and Cockerells at Cockerells Hall, as was the case in the time of Edward 



32 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

the First. A century later the same families still retained their ancient holdings, 
but the quality of the neighbourhood was augmented by the addition of Lord 
Berghersh, one of those twelve chivalrous noblemen to whom the Prince of Wales 
had been committed at the Battle of Cressy. He, though the lord of the Manor 
of LefFey, lived at the Old Hall of Onehouse, which he erected at that time. It 
is supposed that the grant of the lands in Onehouse was made to him as a reward 
for his valour at Cressy. 

No doubt when Queen Elizabeth, in 1571, visited Onehouse in one of her 
progresses, the inhabitants of Buxhall had to furnish their quota towards the 
expenses of entertainment ; for it was customary on such occasions for all the 
neighbouring parishes to contribute towards the amusement and entertainment of 
the royal household. In some parishes the constables paid for the poultry and 
articles required, and charged the amount in the parish accounts. Games, sports, 
plays, and warlike pastimes were provided by the loyal people in the surrounding 
towns and villages It is not hkely that Buxhall enjoyed the actual presence of 
the Virgin Queen in its midst without having to meet a portion of the expenses. 
Her Majesty merely partook of breakfast at Onehouse, but it was a breakfast in 
great style, and one to be remembered as enjoyed under a great oak still standing 
in the garden of Onehouse Hall. James Revitt was the owner of Onehouse at the 
time of the Queen's visit, and his son seems to have been knighted on the 
occasion. Some suppose that on this occasion also the Manor of Woodhall in 
Rattlesden was granted to the father, James Revitt, for he held it at his death in 
1 58 1, as a gift from the Queen.' 

His son. Sir Thomas, was a merchant and alderman of London, and his 
mother was "demoiselle Joan Raven, of Stowmarket." On her visit to Onehouse 
the Queen planted a rose-tree, which it is said was still living some fifty years ago, 
nestling against the remnant of the original house. 

From a Subsidy Roll of the sixth year of Queen Elizabeth 2 we find that the 
parishes of the hundred were taxed in the following proportions : Gipping, 
£6 i6s. 4d. ; Greeting, ^i i6s. 8d. ; Stowmarket, ^^lo los. 8d. ; Thorney Sexton, 
j^8 OS. 6d. ; Finborough Magna, ^^5 os. 8d. ; Finborough Parva, ^8 8s. ; and 
Buxhall, £6 4s. 4d. The assessment on Buxhall was made up thus, in the exact 
terms of the original : — 

Henricus Copinger in terr. ... ... xx" xxvj' iiij'' 

William Syer in terr. ... ... ... vj'' viiij' 

■ Inquisitions, Had. MSS. 639. ^ From the original Roll in the writer's possession. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 



33 



Elizabeth Salter vid. 
Robertus Mark in terr. ... 
Rogerus Salter in terr. ... 
Edmundus Salter in terr. 
Margaret Cuttinge vid. in terr. 
Johnes Salter sen. in terr. 
Margeria Bradstrete vid. 
Robertus Marks in bon. ... 
Henricus Rycher in bon. 
Agnetes Salter vid. in bon. 
Walterus Murk in bon.... 
William Berte in bon. ... 
Johnes Salter jun. in terr. 
Ricardus Sowe in bon. ... 
William Slepp in bonis.... 
Johes Bramys in bonis. ... 

Ricardus Warde in bon 

Gregorius Salter in bon. 
Georgius Salter in terr. ... 
Sma' 



IIIJ"- 


v' inj''- 


iiij"- 


v' iiij''- 


v"- 


vj' viij"* 


vij"- 


ix'- iiij''- 


yh. 


vj^- viij""' 


xx= 


xvj^'- 


vij"- 


vij'- 


iij"- 


iij' 


vj"- 


vj- 


v>'- 


yS. 


v"- 


V'- 


iij"- 


iij' 


iij" 


iiij' 


vj''- 


vj' 


iij"- 


iiJ'- 


iij" 


iiJ' 


XX' 


xvj'' 


vj" 


vj'- 


x"- 


ij'- iiij"- 



VJ nij nij° 



In 1628 the first two subsidies granted to King Charles in the fourth year 
were: Sto-sve Town, £2 8s. od. ; Stowupland, £% \ Combs, £() 4s.; Finborough, 
£1 8s.; Newton, £12; Haughley, £20 i6s. ; Greeting, £2 8s.; Gipping, 
^3 9s.; Wetherden, ^4 i6s. ; Onehouse, i6s. ; Harleston, ^i 12s.; and Buxhall, 
£6 8s. ; making a total of £^4^ 5s. The levy on Buxhall was on the value of 
lands as it appeared in the original account.' 



William Coppinger, Esq'. 
Marye Griges vid. bonis 
Richard Martyne ter. 
Edwarde Crosse ter. 
Richard Syre ter. 

Richarde Sariante ter 

John White ter. 





I 


s. d. 


nf 


I 


12 00 


iij" 





16 00 


XX' 





08 00 


xl'- 





16 00 


xx' 





08 00 


xx' 





08 00 


xx' 





08 00 



The original account is in the writer's 

6 



34 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

John Salter ter. xx' o 08 00 

Rob' Musket ter xx' o 08 00 

Edwarde Salter ter. ... ... ... ... xx^ o 08 00 

William Syre ter xx' o 08 00 

The return is headed : " Stowe Hund : The Certificate of William Coppinger Esq''. 
Samuell Flicke gent Thomas Keble gent James Markes Isarke Motham and John 
Boreham nominated and chardged for the Ratinge and taxinge of all such persons w'^'m 
the sayd hund. as are hable and fitt to be taxed towards the paym' of the twoe 
first Subsidyes graunted to o"^ Souaigne Lord the King's Ma""= by Acte of Parliamente 
made in the fourte yere of his Ma"'= Reygne made and delivered by vs vnto Sir 
Lyonell Talmarsh Knight and Barronett and Sir Henery Berbenham Knight 
comissioners appoynted in that behalfe." It is signed William Copinger, Samuel 
Flick, John Boreham, Tho. Keble, Jsa Markes, Isaac Motham. 

The warrant under which the levy was made is signed by George Waldegrave, 
and is as follows : — 

"SufF': By vertue of the Kings Ma'" Comission of Subsedie to vs and others 
directed These be in the Kings Ma" name to comaund you that p'n'telie vpon the 
receipt herof you doe by like authoritie will and require all such p'sons whose 
names are herevnder written Inhabitinge w'^in the hundred of Stowe in the said 
countie or if some of them be dead or removed thence then other able p'sons of like 
quaiitie residinge w^'n the said hundred in there roomes that they faile not to be 
p'sonallie before vs and other his Ma'" Comissioners at the howse of Edmond Dowe 
in Coddenham in the said Countie vpon the daie of August nex' cominge after 

the date herof by eight of the clocke in the marninge, to doe and p'forme such 
things as shalbe geven them in charge for and concerninge the assessinge taxing and 
levienge of the two first subsedies of the said intire subsedies graunted and con- 
firmed by Act of p'liam' vnto the Kings Ma''' his heires and successors And see that 
you yourselves be p'sente at the said daie and place to returne vnto vs in writinge 
the names of such Cessors And herof not to faile as you tender the Furtherance 
of his Ma'* service therin. And will answere the neglect therof at yo'' p'ille. 
Dated at Helmingham in the said Countie the xxiiij"' daie of Julye in the fourth 
yeare of the Raigne of o'^ Soueraigne Lord Kinge Charles yr 1628." 

" To the cheif cunstables of the hundred of Stowe and to either of them : — 

William Coppinger of Buxhall esq'^. 
Samuell fflicke of Cretinge west gent. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 35 

Thomas Keeble de Newton gent. 

James Marks de ead. gent. 

John Boreham de Combes. 

John Braster de Stowm'kett. 

Isaack Motham de Oonehowse gent. -I-I/IQ^^!*? 



Mathewe Butcher de ffinborowe 



magn. 



A List of Foote Arms charged in the several Townes within the Hundred of 
Bosmere, Clayden, and Stow under the command of Capt. Anthony Gandy 
Esq. Caroli Scdi. Deo. gra., Angl. Scot. &c. R. 28 Ann. Do. 1676: 

BuXHALL. 

William Coppinger Clarke. Musket. Tho. Vice. 

John Grimwood, Geo. Cocksedge, and Rich''. Martin. Musket. Tho. Scovill. 

William Syer and John Syer. Musket. Thos. Jacob. 

John Goddord and Mr. John Malteward and Jn". Wright for his landlord. 

Musket. John Hayward. 
John Howlet, Mark Salter, Jeremiah Gardiner and Jos. Woods. Musket. 
Richard Brown and the W''. Death. Corslet. John Witham. 
William Folker ye W'*. Day and the W''. Hayward. Musket. John Bennet. 
Edmund Grigg. Corslet. 
Thomas Chenery. Corslet. Henry Bannock. 

In 1690 there was great distress in the neighbourhood of Buxhall. Sickness 
was very prevalent, and so numerous the deaths, that an order was obtained from 
the sessions, and afterwards confirmed by the Court ot King's Bench, to raise ;^200 
in the Hundreds of Bosmere, Claydon, Hartismere, and Stow, " for the relief of 
the poor in Stowmarket, who were extremely visited with small-pox." The con- 
tributions in the Hundred of Stow were : Buxhall ^5 12s. 8Jd., Finborough 
£2 1 8s. 2d., Creeting St. Peter ^'2 los. 2d., Stowupland ^^5 15s. yd., Haughley 
j^5 19s. 9d., Newton ^4 19s. lod., Wetherden ^4 3s. 9d., Gipping £2 3s. 8d., 
Halston, Shelland, and Onehouse ^4 13s. 6d. ; total, ^39 17s. i^d. In the whole 
j^i99 4s. 2d. was received from the surrounding country to assist the Stow people 
in their grievous distress. ' 

' Hollingsworth, p. 208. 



36 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

In 1772 the course of the highway from Greit Finborough to Bretteiiham, 
where it passed the Rectory stables, was diverted. The King's Writ — ad quod 
Damnum— ioT the Inquisition was dated July 24th, 12 Geo. III., and the Inquisition, 
which shows the character of the diversion, was as follows : — 

" Suffolk to wit : An inquisition indented taken at Buxhall in the said county 
the 1 8th August in the 12th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George 
the Third by the grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender 
of the Faith and so forth and in the year of our Lord 1772 before me Nathaniel 
Acton Esquire Sheriff of the County aforesaid by virtue of the writt of our 
Sovereign Lord the King to me directed and to this Inquisition annexed by the 
oath of Sir Charles Davers Baronet William Wollaston John Godbold John Leathes 
Christopher Metcalfe Samuel Pocklington Edmund Tyrell Michael Leheng Roger 
Cooke Richard Rout Thomas Rout John Freeman and William Jackson Esquires 
honest and lawfull men of my county who being sworn and charged upon their 
oath to speak the truth and upon the matters and articles in the said Writt specified 
say that it will not be to the damage or prejudice of our said Lord the King 
or of any other if our said Lord the King should grant to the Reverend Henry 
Hill of Buxhall aforesaid Doctor in Divinity in the said Writt named Licence to 
inclose all that part of a certain Highway or Road leading from Great Finborough 
to Brettenham ■ in my County which lies in the Parish of Buxhall in my County 
adjoining to the South side of the Stable yard and garden belonging to the Parsonage 
House and Rectory of Buxhall aforesaid and the Piece of ground of the said Henry 
Hill called Church Green containing in length 39 perches and in breadth 
45 feet To hold the said Common Highway when so inclosed to him the 
said Henry Hill his heirs and assigns for ever because the jurors aforesaid on 
their Oath say that he the said Henry Hill hath made and laid out instead of 
the said Common Highway so to be inclosed another highway in over and through 
his own close or Piece of Land called Enhams in the parish of Buxhall aforesaid 
as convenient for Passengers to all intents and purposes as the said Common High- 
way so to be enclosed now is. And further the Jurors aforesaid on their said 
Oath say that the said Highway so to be inclosed do {sic) contain in Length and 
Breadth as above and in the said Writt is mentioned and set forth. In Witness 
whereof as well I the said Sheriff as the Jurors aforesaid have to this Inquisition 
sett our Hands and Seals the Day Year and Place aforesaid. 

"Nathaniel Acton Esqr. Sheriff." 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 37 

Church and State have always been well supported in this Parish. There are 
now a few Dissenters, but even of these many attend the services of the Church 
occasionally. The Parish In politics is a stronghold of Conservatism. There is a 
Lending Library of about two thousand books. These have been mostly supplied 
by the writer. 

The charities are two. Mark Salter,' by his will, dated August 30, 161 5, 
left a yearly rent-charge of 20s. for the poor parishioners, arising from lands In the 
Parish : 2s. 6d. from land late belonging to John Barnes, 8s. 6d. from land formerly 
belonging to Mrs. Cotton, and 9s. from land formerly belonging to Robert Osborne 
Fuller, and then known as " late Kemballs." 

Also a sum of ^^148 4s. lod. left by the will of Mrs. Elizabeth Sparke 
Garnham invested In Consols, and the dividends or interest arising from which is 
to be distributed in coals to the Poor of the Parish for ever. The rents from Salter's 
gift, as well as the Interest from Mrs. Garnham's benefaction, have for many years 
past been distributed annually in coal. A notice of both the above charities appears 
on a board in the belfry of the Church, and bears the names of William Spink and 
William Kemball, churchwardens, with the date 1840. 

The following copy of a rate made In 1729 may prove of interest as showing 
the inhabitants of Buxhall at that time, and the amounts at which they were 
rated : — 

A rate made by the Inhabitants of the Parish of Buxhall for Docto' Hill 
late Overseer for the poore of the s'' parish for him to Collect fforty rates, 
for his Disbursements from Michas, 



Docto-- Hill Recf^ 
more for his woods ... 
more for pattocks and Gardin 
more for the Lays 
more for Ramplyn's ... 
more for Drivers Land 
Mr. Syliard 

more where Goddard lived 
Greg. Copinger 

' He was married to Jane Syre, Septen 
September 7, 161 5. 



has, 


1729 


to Easter 


following : — 




S. 


d. 




£ s. d. 




01 


02 








00 


02 ) 






rs 


00 


02 ) 








00 


03 




02 01 08 




00 
00 


03 1 

02i) 


2 


II I 




00 
00 


08J 

08 




01 18 04 




01 


02 




02 06 08 


er 5. 


■585, 


and was 


buried, according to the Register, 



38 



History of the Parish of Buxhall. 





s. d. 


£ s. d. 


Mrs. Maltyward 


oo 04 


00 13 04 


Mr. Brooke 

more for farrow field 


00 07J 

00 oof 


01 06 08 


Tho. Poole 


00 I If 




more late Burlande 

more late Wasp's 


00 02 1 

r 
00 05 


08 02 06 


more for Cowterland ... 


00 3 




more for Mulloy's 


00 10 




more for Buxhall-hall 


00 08 




more for Millfield 


00 02 i 




more for the Gleb ... 


• 00 06 




Anthony Osbourn 
more for his own lands 


01 08 
00 oij 


03 10 10 


John Leaver for Saulters 


00 02 1 


00 08 04 


Parsey 


00 09 


01 10 00 


Edm'' Blalces Sen"^ 


01 00 \ 




more for Chenerys 
more for ffelsham fields 


00 02 { 
00 Olf 


03 00 10 


more for Day's lands 


00 02 J 




Edm^ Blakes Junior 


00 06 


01 00 00 


Edm'' How 


01 03 


02 10 00 


William Green 


'00 06 


01 00 00 


John Read late Williams 


00 02 J 


00 08 04 


George Goddard for Cobbs . . . 


00 02 


00 06 08 


Thomas fFuller 


00 031 


00 II 08 


Thomas Jackson 


00 04i 


00 15 00 


Samuel Olford 


00 03 


00 10 00 


Daniel Lambert at the new 






house 


00 06 


01 00 00 


Stephen Keeble 


00 Ol| 


00 04 02 


Edw'' Mullett 


00 03 


00 06 08 


Rob' Burland 


00 05 




more for Marlindown 


00 ooij 




more for Bretts lands 


00 01 !■ 


01 06 08 


Rob' Osbourn 


00 05 ) 


00 16 08 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 



39 











s. 


d. 


£ 


s. d. 


Thomas Mowle 






00 


oii 


00 


04 02 


Thomas Osbourn, for 


P 


-ick's 










land 






00 


oof 


00 


02 06 


William Grimwood 








00 


03^ 


00 


II 08 


Thomas Parker 








00 


01 


00 


03 04 


Samuel Nunn ... 








00 


03 


00 


10 00 


Tho. Penning ... 








00 


02 


00 


06 08 


James Spike ... 








00 


OlJ 


00 


05 00 


Rob' Mount ... 








00 


01 


00 


03 04 


Widdow Cooke 








00 


02 


00 


06 08 


John Hayward 








00 


01 


00 


03 04 


Daniel Lambert Jun' 








00 


oij 


00 


05 00 






^00 


J_9_ 


^5 


i 


16 08 


April 2, 1730, Seen ar 


id 


allowed 










by us untill cause 


be 


shewn 










to the contrary 







RL. B 


RIDGEMAN ; T 


HO. Hill 





Out Setters. 
James Durrant late Boggas 
Walter Wilby late Bixby 
Mr. Beales ... 
John Stearn.... 
John Grimwood 
Rob' Richer 
William Lambert 
William Taylor 
Ant. Osbourn 
Tho. Penning 
Greg Warner 
William Rivers 
John Lambert late Wid" Taylor 
Betheny Bowie 
Thomas Green 



2i 



s. 


d. 


3 


4 


6 


8 


I 


8 


3 


4 


6 


8 


3 


4 


3 


4 


6 


8 


3 


4 


8 


4 


I 


8 


I 


8 





10 


8 


4 









40 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Out Setters. 


S. d. 


William Purr late William Borly 


oi 


John Chapman 


li 


Law. Raynham, late Tho. Richer... 


ol 


John Barnes 


I 


This side 


2 2| 


Other side 


19 5 


;C0I 


01 7f 



Overseer's Disbursem*" come to 
40 rates to collect comes to ... 
Rest due to the parish 



£ 



38 



I 8 

4 2 

o 10 

3 4 

9 2 

16 8 



43 


05 


10 


£ 


s. 


d. 


42 


16 


05 


43 


05 


10 


00 


09 


^ 



Greg Cof 



The Following are Extracts from the Surveyors' Books.' Buxhall, 
September 22, 1804. 

At a Vestry Meeting held this day it was agreed that every Person should 
carry into the Roads Fifty Bushels of Stone for a Day Work for every eight 
pounds as they stand in the rate and to pay 6d. in the Pound Composition for 
the rest. And also to allow 12s. per Day for 50 Bushels of Stones Brought from 
Woolpit as extra work and 6d. for every 50 Bushels carried out of the fields. 
Henry Hill, Robt. Fuller, Robert Ward, Joseph Cooper, Thos. Stearn, Will'" 
Kemball, Jos. Cooper Junr., the mark of Charles Oxer, Benj™ Cole, Geo. 
Wallinger, John Richer. 

In 1 8 12 the rate collected at is. id. in the pound was ^97 9s. 4d. ; the 
" Compersition " £6 lis. 6d., and the Town Stock last year £2 6s. i^d., making 

' By way of explanation we may say that the law, as early as the time of the eighth Henry, was 
that on the Tuesday and Wednesday in Easter week the Constables and Churchwardens were to call 
together a number of the parishioners, who then elected two "honest persons" as surveyors and 
"orderers" for one year. They were fined twenty shillings if they did not serve. They appointed 
four days for "the amendynge " of the highways. And every person having a ploughland in pasture 
or keeping a draught or plough within each parish through which the road ran, was obliged to send 
"one waine or carte, furnished after the custom of the countrye with oxen, horses, or other cattell, 
and also two hable men with the same." They were to make eight hours of these days under the 
surveyors and bring their own tools. If they did not attend they were fined lad. per day. 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 41 

a total of £io-j 6s. ii^d. The total disbursements were £10^ 3s. 2d., being the 
value of the Town Stock at ^2 3s. 9Jd. This account was verified on oath and 
allowed by R. Pettiward and C. Davy. 

1839. May 6. At a meeting of the Parishioners of the Parishes of Buxhall 
and Rattlesden held in Mickery Lane it was unanimously agreed 
that the road should be equally divided and each Parish take 
their share of repairing the same. 

Wm. Kemball. Robt. Murrington. 

Wm. Spink. Chas. Groom. 

Nelson Hatten. John Snell | 

F. R. Melton ) ^ James Cobbold ) "'"^^y°''^- 

J. Clover fS-veyors. 

185 Rods to each Parish. 

Entry in 1839: 6^ Miles hard road; 2 J Miles hard Bye Roads; 2 J Miles 
Green Lanes. 



Extracts from the Registers as to the Parish Boundaries. 

1746. Went the bounds of the Parish. • 

1753. May 4. Went the bounds of the Parish. 

1758. May I. Went the bounds of the Parish. 

1768. May 13. Went the bounds of the Parish. Harry with me. Allowed 
nothing towards the expenses neere yet a great squabble with 
the Parishioners about it. But was determined to introduce no 
custom against the Parson. 

' "Beating the Bounds" of a parish was formerly a matter of importance when boundaries of 
property were not so clearly defined as they are now. In many places the ceremony was performed 
annually, but in Buxhall at intervals ranging from five to eight or ten years. The bounds of a parish 
were often marked by stones or trees called " gospel trees," because the clergyman used to read the 
gospel for the day under their shade, but we do not find any record of such trees or reading in the 
annals of Buxhall. In these bounds beating boys were often flogged at the boundaries or ducked in 
the river where one happened to constitute a boundary in order to help their memory. The impress 
of the body no doubt was not only realistic, but also was intended to symbolise the impression on the 
mind and to strengthen the memory of the youthful recipient as to the true boundary. Of course 
a dinner or a feast of some sort was provided by the parish for the boundary beaters and beaten, and 
any little apparent harshness on the part of the former was readily forgiven in the pleasantries of 
the subsequent conviviality. 

7 



42 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1778. Went the bounds, paid J ye expenses it being my first time it cost me 

1786. Went the bounds, I voluntarily gave one guinea towards the Dinner. 
H. Hill. 

1794. Went the bounds. I w'' not give anything towards the expense of the 
Dinner that no custom might be claimed but after the Bill was paid I 
gave two 5 Basons of Punch. H. Hill. 

[ ]. Went the bounds of the Parish 60 persons attended, the Parish treated 
them with a Dinner, a quart of ale each, and then 3 Gall, of strong beer, 
and after the Bill of 4 = 4 was paid by the Churchwardens : I ordered in 
I OS. worth of Punch always varying the method of any gift upon that 
occasion that no custom may be pleaded. H. Hill. 

1800. Went the bounds about 20 persons in all attended they had dinner &c. at 
Finboro' I gave 5s. The Parish paid for the Commandments &c. being 
painted in the Chancel instead of their being painted in the body of the 
Church as heretofore they had been. H. Hill. 

1808. Went the bounds of the Parish ab* 40 persons began at J past 8 finished at 
^ past 2. The Farmers &c. had a dinner and the men Bread and Cheese, 
and a quart of strong Beer (memo' " very thick ! "). The Bill for the 
whole was £6 15s., and I gave los. in Punch. H. Hill. 

1 8 16. Went the bounds ab' 50 persons began at 8 finished at 3 : Purr ran the 
Wheel not quite 12 miles : the Farmers &c. had a dinner and the men 
Bread and Cheese. The Bill for the whole was £y 12s. I gave one Bottle 
of Punch and one Bottle of Wine. H. Hill. 

1824. May 28. Went the bounds of this Parish. I paid half the expense, viz., 
£^ I OS. N.B. — It was eight years since it was gone last time, but no 
memorandum made. H. Hill. 



Other Memoranda from Registers. 

1 7 A- J^"- 21. Mr. Hill inducted by Mr. Clopton Rector of Rattlesden. 

1710. The Parsonage House was built by the said, Tho. Hill. 

1719. The Church was new pew'd, half att his expense. 

1 72 1. The two Parsonage Barns were built and 1723 one remov'd 1776 and 

cover'd with Reed and Paper. 
1 74 1. Mr. Henry Hill son of the above sd. Tho. Hill was inducted into the 



The Parish, Descriptive and Historic 43 

Parish Church of Tostock In the Co. of Suffolk and Dio. of Norvvch upon 
25 day of May 1741. By the Rev. Mr. R. Fiske. And the said Henry 
Hill was inducted into this Parish Church of Buxhall upon 3 day of Oct. 
1743, by the Rev. Mr. Read Rector of Onehouse. 

1743. Memorandum. That the Parish maintain all the fencing in the Churchyard 
except that side fronting the Chancells end and that fronting the Kitchen 
Garden. N.B. The Parson maintains ye fence no farther than the Garden 
reaches. 

1767. Memo. My son Henry Hill laid the first foundation stone for the Kitchen 
Garden Wall, Apl. 2, 1767, in the 21st year of his age. 

1776. Henry Hill son of the above Henry Hill was inducted into the Parish 
Church of Buxhall on the 6th Jan. 1776 by Thomas Hutchinson Vicar of 
Great Finborough. 

The Poplin Grove planted in the Hop Ground, a.d. 173^. The Maltin 
Office was built Anno Dom. 1727. 

1840. The Bridge near the Lower Farm, on the road leading from Buxhall Church 
to Hitcham, was built this year by Mr. Hill, under the inspection of the 
County Surveyor, and accepted by the County : the Parish contributing ^20, 
and several of the Parishioners performing a part of the carting : cost of 
Bricks and Mortar, £^ 7s. 6d. Bricklayers' Work, _^4 19s. 8d. Digging 
foundations and odd jobs, ^^5 15s. iid. Cost of raising 189 loads of earth, 
165 of gravel, ^^5 15s. lod. Cost of raising 485 of stone, £2 os. 5d. 
The stone and gravel were got in the pit in Worlands. One man and two 
Horses carted 5 loads per day of gravel and stone and 10 of earth. 



CHAPTER II 
The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 

THE Church of Buxhall is dedicated to St. Mary. The present structure, 
probably erected about 1320, stands on the site of an old edifice dating 
from Saxon times. The living is a rectory valued in the King's Book at 
j^20 OS. fd., and now having a yearly rent charge of ^680 in lieu of tithes and a 
residence. In the year 1340 an inquisition was made by special commission throughout 
the kingdom, for the purpose of gathering a subsidy or tax granted by the Parliament 
in aid of King Edward III. and the expensive wars in Scotland and France. This 
tax was a ninth of all that each parish produced from its lands, and of all goods 
and chattels which each man possessed, except the mere husbandman or labourer, 
for these last were exempt from all taxation. The valuation was made on the clergy 
in Suffolk by five commissioners. The curious rolls which estimated the value of all 
the livings and collected the tax from the clergy have been preserved, and published 
by the Government, entitled Inquisitiones Nonarnm. " Buxhall. — Corn, wool, 
lambs. 60 acres, annual value 30s. 6d. per acre; 4 acres arable, annual value i6s. ; 
2 acres of meadow, annual value 4s. ; hay tithes, 20s. ; tithe of hemp and flax, 20s. 
per annum ; offerings and small tithes belonging to the altar, wools and lambs and 
other offerings which amount to yearly 6 marks 6s. lod., and this is testified by the 
oaths of Rob. Cokerel John le Spense, Rob. Str'e [Sturmy] Rich, de Leleseye, of the 
same place." • In 1603 there was an examination of the diocese, and the following 
is the finding as to Buxhall : " Buxhall, Mr. George Dickenson. The number of 
communicants, 3. No recusant of any sorte. It is a parsonage presentative, he hath 
no other. No such theare {i.e., vicarages, &c.) Mr. Henry Coppinger, minister, 
patron." ~ 

The church is built principally of flint. It consists of chancel, nave, and 

' HoUingsworth's " Hist, of Stovvmarket," pp. 88 and 89, compared with original return. 
= Ibid. I s I . 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 45 

massive square tower, supported by buttresses, and contains several monumental 
slabs to the Copinger and Hill families. 

The following description of the Church of Buxhall is taken from the Davy MSS. 
They were notes made in 1826 and 1827 : — 

" Square steeple, broad at bottom, and quite a strong clumsy building, five bells, 
clock with a dial into church, church, chancell, south porch and north vestry leaded, 
church roof much lower than when built. Two holy water stones, side chancel, 
and two broken niches where the three seats were. The church pewed uniformly, 
and nearly paved with brick. The church is battlemented with brick, and the chancel 
with free stone. Two stone pinnacles in the chancel. There is an ancient cross 
between the two pinnacles. A pewter flaggon, small cup, paten, and salver of silver. 
Two lofty steps to the front. A good parsonage adjoining to the churchyard. The 
chancel is forty-four feet nine inches long by twenty feet six inches wide. The 
communion table is raised two steps, and raised round about it on four low pannels 
are the Lord's Prayer, Belief, and Commandments." 

" On the west side of the three arches there were, no doubt, stalls continued 
across the adjoining window for the officiating priests ; part of one of the arches still 
remains. The east window is large, but appears modern. In the first window from 
the end in the south side is a coat of arms much broken and patched, which seem 
to have been 

Copinger, on a fesse arg., three plates. 

In this window also remains part of an inscription. In the next window to 
the west is another coat which has also been broken and patched, but which was 
in all probability : Gu. three cocks or., probably intended for Cockerell. In the 
other windows are some fragments of painted glass. The arms of the Folkards, 
sa. a chev. between three covered cups or. were formerly to be discerned in the 
windows, and a fragment of the shield with one of the cups is still to be seen." 
This family claimed descent from Fulchard '' prepositus '' of Thetford in 11 30. 
William Folcard was Sheriff of Suffolk in 1130. We know of no connection in 
recent times of the Folkards with Buxhall, but indirectly there was a connection 
by marriage with one of the Rectors. John Folkard, whose will is dated April 10, 
1533, lived at Rattlesden, the adjoining parish, and his son, Ambrose Folkard, married 
Judith Devereux, who died in 1658. She was the daughter of Peter Devereux, 
Rector of Rattlesden, who in 1644 left that living to succeed Dr. Ambrose Copinger 
at Buxhall. The similarity in the Christian name is somewhat strange. In the last 



46 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

window westward on the south side was a figure, now gone, but its place filled up 
with scraps, between two angels ; and a part of another figure, probably intended 
for our Saviour, with a reed in His hand. Below are the remains of a legend, 

nc^o pilato. 

On the sides of the chancel are carved oak seats, in the front of which are the 
following arms, also carved : — 



South side. — i. 


Arms of Copinger. 


2. 


A bend engrailed (arms of Herries). 


3- 


Three roses. 


4- 


A fesse between three crescents. 


North side.— I. 


A fesse between two chevrons. 


2. 


A cross engrailed. 


3- 


A voltire engrailed. 



On the north side is a vestry. The nave is sixty feet two inches long and 
twenty-nine feet six inches wide, and was formerly one step above the chancel. 

The description of the Church in the Architectural Notes made by Mr. William 
Caveler, architect from a recent actual survey for the Archaeological Institute, is as 
follows : — " Church, with vestry on north side ; nave, with south porch ; tower at 
west end. A good D. [i.e., Decorated English or Second Pointed, 1 307-1 377] church, 
the only late addition being a three-light P. [i.e.. Perpendicular English or Third 
Pointed, 1377-1546] window in the tower; the chancel has a fine five-light window, 
with good flowing tracery ; the side walls good two-lights ; in the south wall is 
a very pretty double piscina, with tracery, pinnacles, and crocheted canopy ; there 
are some good oak stalls in the chancel, of the same date as the rest of the work ; 
they have panelled fronts and good poppy-heads. The nave has lofty and good two- 
light windows, and the porch an open two-light on either side ; the upper stage of 
the tower has good two-lights ; in some of the windows are considerable remains 
of painted glass, of the same date as the building ; the buttresses at the east end 
are finished with good pinnacles. Font, D., of very excellent design ; the bowl is 
an octagon, with three-foil panels, over which are angular crocheted canopies." 

In an Ipswich paper of August 6, 1826, is the following notice: — "On Sunday 
last an organ was opened at Buxhall Church by Mr. Spinks, jun., put up and 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 47 

greatly improved by Mr. Last, organ builder of Bury St. Edmunds, to the great 
satisfaction of a numerous congregation." 

The late Rector, the Rev. Henry Hill, in 1877 partially restored the Church. 
The old-fashioned pews have disappeared and given place to handsome oaken 
benching, constructed of well-seasoned timber from the adjacent estate. The old 
pulpit, which was adorned with a large heavy sounding-board, has gone, and in 
its place is one constructed of oak, with panels carved in accord with the west 
window. In the chancel choir stalls have been erected on either side, and some 
remains of the old oaken benching, nearly black with age, and greatly mutilated 
by its adaption to the requirements of the pews now abolished, have been utilised in 
this work. The fronts of the choir desks on the south, already referred to, have 
thus been preserved, and they are interesting examples, the panels being adorned 
with shields bearing the arms of the Copingers and families with whom they 
were allied. 

In the floor of the chancel are several monumental stones of the seventeenth 
century (one of which appears to be of Purbeck marble) to the memory of members 
of the Copinger family, and there are some still older which are bereft of their 
brasses and inscriptions. At the south-east angle of the chancel is a fine double 
piscina with a canopy, and the sedilia adjacent thereto had evidently similar canopies 
over, but the stone-work has been broken away, possibly by iconoclasts of the 
Commonwealth period. Here has been placed an ancient stone coffin lid, found 
beneath the floor of the nave. A cross is carved upon the lid, which probably 
formed the covering of the coffin of an ecclesiastic. The benches in the nave 
(which, like those of the chancel, are of oak) are in excellent taste, and the ends 
are carved after the fashion of the tracery of the nave windows. In like manner 
the panels of the new fronts of the choir desks are carved to correspond with the 
tracery of the east window, and the ends of the stalls like the side windows of the 
chancel. Two Jacobean chairs stand one on either side of the altar or communion- 
table, and the old altar rails with slight alterations have been replaced. The floor 
has been levelled and laid with tiles. The chancel has been raised one footpace 
above the nave, there being a white marble step at that point, and there are other 
similar steps at the altar rails. 

The Bells are five in number and very choice. It is somewhat remarkable 
that until recent years so little attention has been devoted in this country to 
campanology. Few have made it their special study. Even abroad, where more 
attention has been paid to the art and to its historical aspect, the study has never 



48 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

been popular. In the case of the present Parish, the Registers and parish archives 
have been searched to discover something respecting the original casting, re-casting, 
hanging, or repairs effected from time to time of the bells, but fruitlessly. 
Occasionally, it it true, we find items of information as to repairing, but not many, 
and in this Parish vi'e do not find the covers and fly-leaves of the early Registers 
so profusely adorned with miscellaneous information as is not uncommonly the case 
with the Registers of some parishes. Buxhall Rectors and Registrars seem to have 
religiously confined themselves to the recording with commendable accuracy the dry 
details which form the substance of the ordinary Register. 

In the year 1553 there is a record that the bells were four in number.' Davy 
visited the Church June 13, 1827, for the purpose of noting particulars of the 
Bells, but found the door locked. He states, however, the correct number — 
five. On a careful examination of the condition of the frame, the clappers, and 
the bells, one cannot resist coming to the conclusion that the religious element has 
been in active operation in the Belfry, and a case of conversion has been the result. 
Four Bells have been converted into five. The Tenor Bell of the original peal of 
four must have been exceptionally fine. No doubt it measured four feet one inch 
in diameter, and weighed at least a ton, and was an E bell. Probably this bell was 
in the year 1632 re-cast, and now forms the present tenor and second, which both 
bear this date. 

The old clappers were fastened to the crown staple of the Bells by a C hook, 
the oldest known form of securing the clapper, and the method in vogue before 
ringing became customary when, to enable the bell to be raised for the purpose 
of ringing without the clapper falling out, a narrow strip of wood was fixed by 
means of a leather thong over the open part of the C hook, extending half-way 
down the clapper. This simple method, which met a difficulty arising under a 
change in the manner of ringing, has been retained in the case of the Buxhall 
bells almost to the present day. When the bells were repaired and re-hung a 
few years since the primitive expedient referred to disappeared with the original 
clappers, new clappers of light construction and with modern fastenings being 
substituted. 

About seven feet above the Bell frame may still be seen a massive oak beam, 

■ This is in a Certificate of Church property. "Great Finborough had: Cuppes one, weighing 
vii. oz. — Great Bells iij. Buxhall is the only parish in Stow Hundred apparently having no 
chalice, but has Create Bells iiij. The total amount of plate in the Hundred was cxxij oz. j qz., 
and the number of Create Bells xxxvij, iij." Rattlesden had one chalice " wayinge xx oz. iij qz., 
and four Great Bells." 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 49 

with ten or eleven mortise holes, which evidently was placed there for the purpose 
of lifting the Bells into their proper position on the frame. The mode of raising 
is also sufficiently indicated as having been done by hand, by the mortised holes 
for the handpikes. 

The size, weights, and inscriptions on the bells are as follows : — 
I. and 2. Size 2 feet 8 J in. Inscription, "John Draper' made me 1632. 
R. M. and T. N. Wardens." A maiden bell. - 

3. Size 2 ft. II in. Inscription "John Draper made me 1635." 

4. Size 3 ft. ii in. dia. Inscription, "John Griggs C.W. Charles 

Newman made me 1698." 

5. Tenor Bell. Size 3 ft. yf in., weight about 16 cwt. Inscription : 

" Gregory Copinger, Tho. Fuller C.W. 
Tho. Gardiner Sudbury fecit 1739." A maiden bell. 

One of the bells is employed by the Clock for striking the hours. This 
clock is of a peculiar character. There are said to be but three in the whole 
country. It has no face and strikes, as we have said, on the tenor bell. It is 
wound up with a rope on a wheel, similar to those used for steering a vessel. The 
clock was made by the Village Blacksmith, a well-known character in his day, who 
rejoiced in the name of Purr. This Purr, the Buxhall blacksmith, was the maker 
also of the old Stowmarket clock. The Buxhall clock has for years been wound 
up, and is still kept In repair by his successor in business, Sawyer, who continues 
the smithy on the old spot. There is a tradition that out from this village smithy 
there came in days gone by the founder of that well-known and highly respected 
firm, Woods and Co., of Stowmarket. 

A new Organ was placed in the Chancel in 1890, the old Organ being removed 
to Shelland Church. The old Organ had, in former years, stood in its proper place 
at the west end. A finely carved oak Lectern was in 1897 presented to the 
Church by the writer in recognition of the return to his family of a portion of 
the estates once possessed by them in the county, on the purchase by him of the 
Cockerells Hall Estate. 

Isabell, wife of Sir Edmund Hethersete, Knt., son of Simon de Hethersete, 
Knt., and Cecily his wife, one of the King's justices, was buried in Buxhall 
Churchyard in 141 2.3 

Some of the Headstones in the Churchyard are : John Maltyward Gent, died 

' Draper was Mayor of Thetford. = That is, a bell which came quite true in the casting. 

3 Blomefield's "Norfolk," v. 36. 



50 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1721 ; Elizabeth his wife d. 6 Oct. 1759 aged 76; Wilham son of Stephen 
and Christian Brook of Stowmarket d. 1781, aged 45 ; Mrs. Christian Brook 
relict of Stephen d. 25 Sept. 1806 aged 85 ; Stephen Brook late of Stowmarket d. 
23 Feb. 1773 aged 57 ; Stephen son of Stephen and Christian Brook of Stow- 
market d. in London 30 Nov. 1761 aged 17 ; John Cocksedge d. 12 March 1728 
aged 78; Mary wife of Thomas Brook d. 16 Nov. 1754 aged 78 ; Thomas Brook 
d. 1740 aged 71; Mr. William Brook d. 24 Sept. 1787 aged 76; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Brook d. 9 Dec. 1787 aged 78; Susan wife of Robert Fuller Gent., 
d. 8 June 1820 aged 73; Robert Fuller Gent. d. 14 Jan. 18 13 aged 59; 
Robert Osborn Fuller d. 20 Sept. 181 7 aged 29. There are seven more 
Fullers, and other headstones bearing the names Poole, Jacob, Bird, Brooks, &c. 
There was a headstone with the inscription : Nycolas Tymperley Esquire who 
dysseased the xx day of May, A "M" iiij. ix." (1409) (Add. MSS. Brit. Mus. 
Aysc. Cat., No. 4969, fol. 43, Hawey's Colec), but Weever, in his " Ancient 
Funeral Monuments," has the inscription, " Nycholas Tymperley ■ esquire who 
dysceased the 20 of May, M. cccc. Ixxxix." 

The record of Rectors preserved in the Diocesan Registry at Norwich is 
from the year 13 10. Of many of the early Rectors little or nothing is known. 
The wills of some are still extant, and these we propose to give extracts from. 
The first Rector known of Buxhall is — 

1 3 10. Lemannus Gernoun 

1 3 1 1 . William de Orford 

■ The Timperleys continued to hold land of the Manor of Buxhall tor nearly two centuries 
after this. They were free tenants ot the Manor, and in 1651 Sir Thomas Timperley, knight, sold 
his free tenements to Edward Wemeve, Esq. The Timperleys came originally from Timperley in 
Cheshire, and Drinkstone seems to be connected with them, for this was originally called 
Drinkstone-cum- Timperley. The family settled at Hintlesham and were lords of the manor there in 
the fourteenth century. A tomb in the chancel of the Parish Church there of blue marble has, drawn 
on brass, the portraiture of a man in complete armour and a woman with a hound at her feet, with the 
inscription : " Here lyeth the Venerable man John Timperley Esq. Heir and Lord of Hyntlesham, 
and Margaret his wife which John dy'd An. 1400." On another marble stone is likewise a man 
in complete armour, with the Inscription, " Of your Charity pray for the Soul of William Timperley 
who dy'd March 10, a.d. 1527. On whose Soul and all Christians, Jesus have Mercy." There 
are, or were, two other tombs in the Chancel, the one of alabaster of Thomas Timperley, Esq., who 
dy'd Jan. 14, 1500, and of Etheldred his wife, the daughter of Nicholas Hare, as also of Katharine 
his second wife ; the other of Nicholas Temperley, Esq., and Anne his wife, the daughter and 
heir of William Markham, Esq. The Veseys of Cockerells Hall originally came from Hintlesham, 
and owned another Manor in that place. Hintlesham had belonged to Bury Abbey, and on the 
Dissolution was granted by Henry VIII. to Robert Downs, from whose family it passed to the Veseys. 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 5 1 

1332. Geoffrey Fausebroun ' 
1 36 1. Thomas Cat de Thetford 

Cat is mentioned in the Feet of Fines as Parson of Mosec (?), 30 Edw. III., 
and as Parson of Okholt, 34 Edw. III. Amongst the ancient Deeds in the 
Public Record Office is preserved a grant by William Ouick, of Sudbury, and 
Robert Monk, of Newton, to Sir Thomas [Cat] de Thetford, who is described as 
the Rector of Buxhall, of a messuage in Sudbury abutting on the street called 
" Croftstrete." It is dated "Tuesday before Michaelmas, 2 Rich. II." (A 5338). 

Thomas appears to have had the misfortune to be robbed by one, who, if 
not of his own family, bore the same surname. The robbery was effected on the 
eve of the Epiphany, 1379, by William Cat, who hid in Thomas's chamber and 
stole 500 marks. On the Patent Rolls (11 Rich. II. part ii., m. 26d) is the 
appointment, dated May 25, 1388, of Richard de Abberbury, Edmund de 
Lakyngheth, Robert Hotoft, and Thomas Claymond to inquire who stole and 
carried away divers goods and chattels of Thomas Cat, parson of Buxhall, and 
500 marks of his money at Buxhall, within the lordship of Queen Anne, and 
who afterwards seized the same when left behind by the thieves, and to certify 
their value. And in the same Rolls 4 Rich. II., part i. m. 39, we find a 
pardon to John Taillour, of Hawelee (Haughley), for harbouring William Cat, of 
Hawelee, who on the eve of Epiphany, 2 Rich. II., hid in the chamber of the 
parson of Buxhall and robbed him of his goods. 

Thomas Cat made his will the Monday after the Feast of St. Matthew the 
Apostle, 1392 ; but it has suffered much from damp and neglect in former years 
and is in parts wholly unreadable. The following is an extract : — 

" My soul to God and all the Saints &c. My body to be buried in the 
Chancel of the blessed Mary of (Buxhall ?). To the tower of Buxhall (xxv) 
marks. To the parish chaplain there . . . To the High Altar there xij''. All 
debts to be paid and residue to my executors to dispose for my souls welfare. 
Testament made Wednesday before the feast of St. Gregory 1392. xxj marks to 
the chaplain to celebrate for my soul . . . epitogium de Scarlet, unum lectum 
rubeum, unam oUam eneam, unam patellam optimam, vj cochlear . . . unum maser 

' Sir Edward de Creting, by deed dated at Barrow on Sunday next after the Feast of the Nativity 
of the Blessed Virgin, 30 Edw. III. attorned to Sir Thomas Felton and his trustees Geoffrey Fauseborne 
parson of the Church of Buxhall, and John Cakistrete of Fynbergh as to lands in the Hundred of 
Thingoc (Gage's " Thingoe," p. 11). Geoffrey Fausebroun is also mentioned in the Feet of Fines, 30 
and 34 Edw. ni. 



52 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

cum cooptorium . . . To Hawis unum pelium cum lavacre . . . To John 
(Cat ?) meum epitogium de russeto et unam (claram ?) de eadem . . . To John de 
Coquina I'f. 

"Proved 26 April 1393 in the Consistory Court of Norwich. Register 
Harsick fol. i8i'\" 

1393. William Wayte 

1410. William Pollard 

141 1. William Copynger 

The following extract from Pitseus ■ probably applies to this William Copynger : — 
"Guilhelmus Copingerus^ natione Anglus Oxoniensis academiae magister insignis 
Putatur ahquando alumnus fuisse CoUegii Balleolensis, et in ejusdem gymnatii 
Bibleotheca ferunt opera quoedam illius ad annos bene multos asservata, ex quibus 
coUigitur hominem semper studia litterarum et virtutum ita conjunxisse, ut in 
utrisque pacem, et eos certe magnos fecerit progressus. Completes testes habemus 
ejus lucubrationes doctas simul et pias. 

" De virtutibus et vitiis, lib. unum. Vani sunt omnes honores. 

■ "De Illus. Angl. Script.," p. 852. 

^ As to the origin of the name the following letter, written by the Rev. T. S. Omerod, the well- 
known Rector of Redenhall and antiquarian, to the late Mr. Copinger Hill in 1863, may be of interest: — 

Redenhall Rectory, Noz'. 20, 1863. 
Copinger. 

Dear Mr. Hill, — Pardon my intruding my thoughts on the above matter. 

1. Copenhagen will never do. It is itself a French corruption of Kioben-hava, pronounced Chipping- 
haven. 

2. Nor will the analogy help from Ballinger — bcllum gerens — an armed vessel of Henry VII. and VIII. 's 
time. It is modern, and I know no Latin word of office or authority which could be combined with gerens 
so as to make up your ancient name. 

3. I should be glad if you and Mr. Steward would note for me, if you came across any names or 
places in W. or Central Suffolk where Cop or Cap form the root, as Copdock (the " high-wooded knoll "), 
Copt Hall in Essex (not London), &c. Meanwhile I am strongly of opinion that, like Billing Watling, 
Uffing Watling, your name is Copping, from Coppe or Koppe, an old Saxon or Scandinavian word for " head " 
or " elevation," still in use as a proper name, just as my own root syllable, Orme, in ordinary Sa.\on or Modern 
Swede or Danish = a serpent. Copping would mean the relatives or clan of such man (as in the names 
above). Coppinger is merely the word at full length, as it would be written {Coping va) down to 



Henry I.'s time. 



fours sincere!' 



There can be no doubt Mr. Ormerod is right. The Anglo-Saxon Cop is " head," inger is the 
Latinised German form of ing, " descendant of" ; so that Copinger is really the descendant of the Head. 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 53 

" Sacramentale quoddam, lib. unum. Et alia non pauca, quorum tamen tituli 
mihi sunt incogniti, uti et tempus quo vixit." 

He was an executor to the Will of the wife of Ed. Hethersete, Esq. : — 

" Isabella quae fuit uxor Edmundi Hetersete militis per Test, suum, dat. xx. 
Jan., 13 Hen. 4 et probat. 2 Marc, 1416, legat Aliciae Copynger totam 
pecuniam suani. Item voluit qd Willus Copynger clicus Johes Copynger et alii 
habeant omnia bona sua, &c., quae dedit et assign' eis per factum suum dat. 
XX. Aug. 12 Hen. IV. 

" Probat. ij Mar., 1416, et com. adm. Wills. Copynger extori Ex Regm. 
Hyrnynge in Ard. Reg. Nonv. pte 2a fo. 24a." (Harl. MSS., B.M., No. 10, 
fol. 211^). 

He made his Will at Buxhall, September 3, 1436, by which he ordered 
that his body should be buried in the chancel of the Church at Buxhall. He 
bequeathed his manor, called Buxhall Hall, with the advowson of the Church of 
the same village, and all other appurtenances, to his brother John for life, with 
remainder to his son William in fee. He bequeathed to Walter, another son of 
his brother John, a tenement called Cordes in Finborough Magna, and a messuage 
called Baronys. He mentions Alicia, wife of his brother John, and Margaret, 
daughter of the said John, a nun. The Will was proved September 13, 1436 
(Harl. MSS., No. 10, fol. 261^). 

1436. John Howard. 
Howard was Rector for over twenty years and died in 1457. His Will, 
which is in Latin, is preserved at Norwich (Brosiard, fol. 46), and is dated at 
Buxhall, May 5, 1457. The following is an extract: "John Howard Rector of 
the Church of Buxhall of sound mind &c. My soul to God Almighty, the 
Blessed Mary the Virgin and all the Saints and my body to be buried in the 
Chancel of the said Church at the entrance to the Choir. To the High Altar 
there vj"' viij'' To the repair of the (?) cloth of the said altar iij' iiij''- (' ad 
repar. towell. ejusd. altari '). To the parish Clerk 6'', and the sacrist, there 4'*-. 
To the 4 orders of friars, each 2 bushels of malt. 

To the repair of Burford Bridge 4 bushels of malt 

To Isabell Conever and her sister ... ... 2 „ 

To John Caldewell and his wife ... ... 2 ,, ,, 

To John Bost and his wife... ... ... 2 ,, ,, 



54 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

To Mariote Shepherde ... ... .... i bushel of malt. 

To Roger Barleway and wife ... ... 2 ,, ,, 

To Thomas Gold ... ... i ,, ,, 

To Thomas Cord 'scriptor' ... ... i ,, „ 

To each godson and goddaughter I have in Buxhall S"*. 
" To William Howard my brother and Elizabeth his wife 6^- S^- and to the said 
Elizabeth a red cloak, furred. To William Chatysle and Agnes his wife 6"- S''-. 
To each nephew and niece ii"*- and a cow. To Margaret Wymbysh i6''- and a 
bullock. ' Assigno Reverendo magistro Joh'i Howard Armig^ : unum equum nigrum 
ambulantem. To the Convent of Ixworth, a book, and to Sir John Wode, Rector 
of Kedyngton a book called Innocentius. To Robert Chatysle my nephew a book 
of decrees and a book of decretals, a book, called ' Apparatus Arch'i ' and John 
upon vj'™, one book of Clement with 2 books of doctors and a book called 
' Pupilla occuli ' and all my iron pots kettles, cloathes, &c. &c. To William 
Howard my nephew one book of decrees with a black fastening, one book called 
Innocentius, one book called Crisostomos cum speculo humani salvationis and 
one book of Institutes. 

" All corn and tithes &c. of Buxhall to my executors, i.e. John Wode, William 
Howard my brother, WiUiam Chatysle, Stephen Wymbysh ; and my master John 
Howard Esq', to be supervisor. Proved 20 June 1457 by W'". Howard and W. 
Chatysle, power reserved, &c." 

1457. John Powlyn. 

1477. Thomas Draper, 
who exchanged the Mastership of the college at Attleborough with Powlyn for the 
Rectory.' 

1479. William Chapman. 

1513. Richard Reve. 

1 53 1. Henry Todd. 

1556. Thomas Passefonte. 
Passefont made his Will May 7, 1567, which is preserved at Norwich (Register 
Bunne, fol. 9), and the following is an extract : " My soul to God Almighty my 
Creator and Redeemer and my body to be buried in Buxall Churchyard at the 
Chancels end. To the poormens box there 12''. To every poor householder of 
Buxall a peck of wheat and a peck of mault. To Marion my wife 6 comb of 
' Blomeficld's " Norfolk," i. 541. 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 55 

wheat and 6 comb of mault, a 3 year old bullock, my eldest cow, a calf, my best 
gowne, 12 hens and a cock, 2 hoggs, my deepe kettle, a Brasen posnett, a bruyng- 
tubbe, a keler, 2 furkyns, a mylke tub and a bed and belongings, pewter platter 
and 40'. To Robert Passefont my son a ' dowell ' cowe of 4 years, a bullock, 
my baye amblynge mare, my best posted bed, my 2"'' coveringe, pewter platters, 
table napkins, sheep, furred cloath and 40' at 2 1 years of age. To Philemon 
Passefonte, my son, a brown cowe, my youngest red cowe, my dun mare called 
' Mocke,' my best cloak 2"'' posted bedstead and best covering, pewter and 40" 
at 21. To William Passefonte, my son, my great blacke garjey cowe, red bullock, 
grey mare called Dobb, bed, napkins, pewter, 2"'' gown and 40^ when 21. To 
Sara my daughter red dswyd cowe, bullock, my new caldeyron, pewter platters and 
dishes, water pot and napkins at 21. To James Passefonte my brother, a seame of 
Barley, and the residue amongst my wife and four children, equally. My best 
beloved in Christ William Syer of Buxall to be executor." The witnesses were 
Wm. Bearte and John Osbon of Buxall, and the Will was proved July 4, 1567, at 
Norwich. 

1569. Ambrose Copinger. 

He was presented to the Living of Buxhall by his father, Henry Copinger, 
having been educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, of which college he was 
a fellow. 

He is probably the same man who was Bursar, St. John's College, Cambridge, 
2 Elizabeth, and who, March 27th, signed a lease as such. 

He was knighted by King James at Whitehall on July 23, 1603, before 
the coronation.' He married Lettice, daughter of Edward David Fitzgerald, brother 
of the Earl of Kildare, but died without issue March 17, 1603-4. 

Sir Ambrose Copinger did not retain his Living of Buxhall for more than one 
year, for we find, in 1570, he resigned and Henry Copinger, the Patron, thereupon 
presented. 

1570. George Dickenson. 

He had a long tenure, holding for close on fifty years. As before stated, the 
number of communicants in 1603 is said to have been three, but at the same 
time there was no recusant of any sort. He appears often in the Court of Rolls, 
and seems to have been fined by the Court Leet of the Manor for playing bowls. 
He married Elizabeth, the widow of one Salter, and for many years lived in the 

' Harl. MSS. 6062, List of Knights, 1603-36 ; but his name is there hy mistake said to be 
Henry. 



56 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

house now known as Purple Hill. He died in 1619, and was buried March 20th 
in the Chancel of the Church of Buxhall. 

1 6 19. Ambrose Copinger. 

He was presented by his father, Henry Copinger, to the living of Buxhall, and 
was collated June 2, 16 19, to a Prebendary Stall in York Cathedral. The new 
Rector had been born at Lavenham and baptized there on the 29th of December, 
1583. Of his early life little can be gathered. He married Judith, the only 
daughter of Roger Kedington a Kerington, by whom he had issue two sons, 
Ambrose and Henry, and two daughters, Ann and Margaret. He was a Doctor 
of Divinity, and on the 23rd of December, 1622, was presented to the Living of 
his native place as successor to his father. He still retained the Living of Buxhall, 
and was buried in the Church there in January, 1644, but without a stone to mark 
the spot. His Will, made 3rd of April, 1642, was proved in the Prerogative Court 
on the 4th of December, 1644. His successor at Lavenham, the celebrated Mr. 
Gurnall, was presented in December, 1644. 

One of Dr. Ambrose Copinger's daughters lies buried in Buxhall Church. 
This was Ann. She married three times, her third husband being Sir George 
Reeve, Bart., of Thwaite, Co. Suffolk. She died on the 30th of April, 1692, 
and in the Church below the railings, a little to the north of the centre, is a flat 
stone of black marble with the following inscription : — 

Here under lyeth the body of 

Dame Ann Reeve, who departed 

this life the last day of April, 1692. 

Arms above in a lozenge Reeve : — Sa, on a chevron between three fleurs de lis, 
or. as many crowels of spears, az., with the arms of Ulster, impaling Copinger. 
Her bones have been, it seems, removed. 

1644. Peter Devereux. 
He was of Rattlesden, and left that place to succeed Dr. Ambrose Copinger 
at Buxhall. 

1644. Thomas Copinger. 
Thomas Copinger, a brother of Dr. Ambrose, however, succeeded Mr. 
Devereux the same year, and Francis Copinger, another brother, farmed the Parson- 
age. Eighteen years after his entrance Thomas Copinger resigned the Living. 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 57 

1662. William Copinger. 

He was a nephew of Dr. Ambrose Copinger, and was presented by his mother, 
Mary Copinger, the then Lady of the Manor. He was in his thirty-eighth year, 
having been baptized at Buxhall on the 8th of December, 1624. 

In a somewhat rare book published in London, 1648, will be found a recom- 
mendation by this William. The book is " An Essay on Statius ; or, The Five 
First Books of Publ. Papinius Statius his Thebais. Done into English Verse. By 
T[homas] S[tephens]. With the Poetick History Illustrated." Amongst apprecia- 
tions, in poetic form, from Reginald Bekenham, Rob. Baldocke, Clem. Paman, 
Pereg. D'Oyly, Thomas Poley, and Ch. Woodward, is the following : — 

Oualiter in mundi votis, eviumque querelis, 

Nata recens, surgit gratior inde dies ; 
It meliore coma, flavos spondetque capillos. 

Lanugo tenerse lucis, Apollo, tuas : 
Nostratis Stati, sic dum crepuscula spargis, 
Optamus totam, quas sine nube, diem : 
Sylvas ut detonss, ccelo videantur aperto. 
Nulla sit obscuro textilis umbra loco. 

Sic erit ; et laetam faciet nunc Statius urbem : 
Thebais et populo fiet amica novo. 

Gulielmus Copinger. 

William survived his poetical effusion thirty-six years, which may seem strange, 
and, dying in 1684, was buried on the 4th of March in the chancel of the Church 
of Buxhall, where on a flat stone is an inscription to his memory, now and for 
many years past illegible, but which was as follows : — 

Memorias Sacrum 

Gulielmi Copinger 

Stirpe antiqua et honesta nati 

Literarum humaniorum Artiumq. M" 

Rem theologicam apprime callentis 

Omni modoq. virtute 

Humana sociali divina 

eximie imbuti 

Qui hinc ecclesiae per annos circiter xxxvi. 

prasfuit Rector 

9 



58 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Officio, beneficio, consilio exemploq. optimo 
nee Reverend us 
Inde cum santissimum illud Manus (sic) 

Summa cum laude decorassit 

Maturus coelo, et amatus omnibus 

Tranquille, ut vixit, obiit. 

Cal. Martiis MDCLXXXIV. 

Anno ^tat. suas LXI. 

Hoc monumentum Filii superstites 

Gulielmus et Gregorius 

Pietatis ergo posuere. 

The arms on the tomb are Copinger, impaling Wood, a lion rampant. 

William Copinger was succeeded by his son William on the presentation of 
his first cousin, Henry Copinger in 1685.' He had been admitted Sizar, March 
24, 1673-4, ^t St. John's College, Cambridge, being then sixteen, and in 1677 
had proceeded to the degree of A.B., and to the degree of A.M. in 1681. He 
died in 1708, and by his Will, dated the i8th of February, 1707, gave all 
his messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments to be sold within two years 
after his decease by his brother Gregory Copinger and his widow Margaret, whom 
he appointed executor and executrix. He owned, amongst other property, Jarold's 
Wood in Buxhall, containing seven acres, and also a messuage and three acres and 
a tenement called Parminsters, containing sixteen acres, and a Pightle of land con- 
taining two acres, lying under the wood called Rattlesden Wood, all held of the 
Manor of Rattlesden in reversion expectant on the death of his mother, Mary 
Copinger, and certain other copyhold hereditaments to which he was admitted on 
the 19th of October, 1696, upon the death of his brother Francis. 

This William Copinger was the last Copinger Rector of Buxhall, and upon his 
death, August 5, 1708, George Watson was presented to the Living. Sarah Copinger 
had by deed dated April 10, 1708, for ;^i8o, sold the next presentation to James 
Daniel, of Alpheton, in the county of Suffolk, gent., and it is possible, therefore, 
this presentation was made by him ; but it is usually stated to have been made by 
Sarah Copinger. Anyhow, the new Rector did not long enjoy the living, for in the 
following year he resigned, and Mrs. Sarah Copinger presented her son-in-law, 
Thomas Hill, Doctor of Divinity. Thomas Hill had married Sarah, the daughter 

' William's uncle had left him the next presentation by his will, but as this would not have 
enabled him to present himself, no doubt the presentation was arranged in this way to evade the law 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 59 

and sole heiress of Henry Copinger, by which marriage the Copinger estates in a 
sense passed into the family of Hill. The meaning of in a sense will be made 
apparent when we come to deal with the descent of the Manor of Buxhall. 

The' new Rector was born in 1678, and received his academical education at 
St. John's College, Cambridge, where he proceeded to the degree of A.B. in 1700, 
to that of A.M. in 1704, and to that of S.T.P. in 1719. He died on the 4th of 
September, 1743, and was interred in the Chancel of the Church of Buxhall, where, 
on a marble tablet, is this inscription to his memory : — 

In memory 

of Thomas Hill, Doctor of Divinity, many years 

Rector of this Parish, and in Commission of the Peace 

for this County. 

He married Sarah, daughter and sole heiress 

of Henry Copinger, Esq., Lord of this Manor, 

by whom he had several children. 

He died Sept. 4th, 1743, in the sixty-fifth year of his age, 

and rests in hopes of a blessed immortality. 

Disce quid es, 

quid eris, memor esto quod morieris. 

Near him lyes his eldest son, Thomas Hill, Esq., Lord of 

this Manor, and Patron of this Church ; he died Sept. 

5, 1746, aged 35 years. 

By the side of his grave are deposited the remains of 

his wife, who departed her \\i^ May 4th, 1748, aged 23. 

And near this marble lye two sons and a daughter 

of the Rev. Mr, Henry Hill. 

Thomas died Feb. 11, 1747, aged 2 years and 9 months. 

Susan died April 22, 1755, aged 8 months. 

and Thomas, died June 15, 1756, aged 5 weeks and 4 days. 

Lydia, daughter of Thomas Hill, Esq., died May 8th, 1759, 

aged 13 years. 

Martin, son of H. Hill, D.D., died Feb. 26, 1761, aged 12 years. 

Sarah Hill, relict of Thos. Hill, D.D., died Jan. 17, 1762, aged 

75 years. 

Copinger, son of H. Hill, D.D., died Sept. 3, 1765, aged 6 years. 



6o History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Arms below : — 

Hill, gu. two bars, erm. in chief a lion passant, or. ; on an escutcheon of 
pretence, Copinger : — Bendy of six gu., and or., on a fesse az., three plates. 

Crest, on a chapeau gu. turned up, erm., a demi lion passant, or., between 
two dragons' wings expanded of the first, each charged with two bars, erm. 

Against the same wall westward on a small square tablet of white marble is : — 

Henry Hill, D.D. 

obiit 8th Nov. 1775. 
Anno yEtatis 60. 

And on a similar tablet a little to the west : — 

Susan Hill 

Relict of Henry Hill, D.D. 

obiit Sept. 8th, 1794. 

aged 77. 

And opposite to this on the north side on a similar tablet : — 

Henry Hill, A.M. 

obiit 31st July, 1826, 

Anno iEtatis 79. 

1743. Henry Hill. 
In 1743 Henry Hill, the second son of Sarah Hill, daughter of Henry 
Copinger, was presented to the Living by his mother, Sarah Hill. He had been 
educated at Caius College, Cambridge, where he had proceeded to the degree of 
A.D. in 1737, to that of A.M. in 1751, and to that of S.T.P. in 1763. In 1741 
he had been presented to the Rectory of Tostock. He died on the 8th of 
November, 1775, and was succeeded in the Living by his son the following year 
on the presentation of his grandmother, Sarah Hill. 

1747. Henry Hill. 
The new Rector, Henry Hill, was born in 1747, and a brief memoir of him 
will be found on pp. 282 and 648 of vol. xcvi., part 2, of the Gentleman's 



J 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 6i 

Magazine. He was admitted at Clare Hall, Cambridge, taking his A.B. degree in 
1768, and A.M. degree in 1771. He became Rector of Harlaston in 1779, and 
was a Trustee of the Stowmarket Navigation, and Vice-President of the Corporation 
for Relief of poor Widows and Orphans of Clergymen within the Archdeaconries 
of SufFolk and Sudbury. He married Elizabeth, a daughter of John Tweed, Esq., 
of Stoke by Clare, and sister of the Rev. Joseph Tweed, Rector of Capel St. Mary. 
By this lady he left no issue. Mr. Henry Hill communicated to the Board of 
Agriculture some useful practical observations on the mode of drilling wheat, which 
he had successfully practised for many years, and these are inserted in Young's 
" General View of the Agriculture of SufFolk." 

1826. Charles Green. 
Henry Hill died July 31, 1826, in his seventy-ninth year, having by his Will 
dated July 28, 1826, devised the next presentation of the Rectory to the Rev. 
Charles Green, and subject thereto given the advowson to his nephew Copinger 
Gooch, in his Will called Copinger Henry Gooch. He also gave to Mr. Green 
about sixty acres formerly in the occupation of Thomas Stearn, but then of the 
said Charles Green, but provided that in the event of Mr. Green dying without 
issue at his death the same should go, after certain limitations to trustees, to his 
nephew Copinger Gooch in fee. The Rev. Charles Green was, on his own petition, 
instituted in October, 1836, to the Living of Buxhall. Green died in 1852, and 
was succeeded by Copinger Gooch, who assumed the name of Hill. 

1852. Copinger Gooch. 
He was the son of Mr. William Gooch, a beer brewer of Great Yarmouth, and 
of Mary Hill; and in July, 1830, married Emily, daughter of the Rev. George 
Pyke, of Bay thorn Park, in the County of Essex. He died on May 13, 1870, 
when he was succeeded by his eldest son, the Rev. Henry Hill. 

1870. Henry Hill. 
The Rev. Henry Hill was born August 6, 1834, and received his academic 
education at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he took his degree in 1857. On 
August 14, 1862, he married Eleanor, daughter of Matthew Chamley, of Worcop, 
County Westmorland, by whom he had a numerous family, and of whom his eldest 
son, Henry Copinger Hill, who was born October 9, 1865, and educated at Sherborne 
and Trinity Hall, Cambridge, is the owner by purchase of the advowson. The 



62 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Rev. Henry Hill died July 15, 1901, and the Rev. Henry Copinger Hill is the 
present Rector, having been instituted on his own petition by the Bishop of 
Norwich on September 4, and inducted by the Rev. D, A. Lawrence, Archdeacon 
of Suffolk, September 11, 1901. 



The following is an extract relating to Buxhall from the Norwich Domesday 
book. The year inscribed on it is 1300, but the general view is that the date should 
be placed somewhat later : — 

Archdeaconry of Sudbury ) 

_- ^ „ \ Diocese or Norwich. 

Deanery of Stowe J 

Buxhall ; Estimac' eccl'ie pret' porcione' xxx mar' : Inde decima xP Porcis Po'ris 

de Stokes in eadem eccl'ia xxx^- Vnde decima iij^- de ffrancia. Bona ab'bis Colcestrie 

in eadem Villa de Redditu x^ Bona Prioris de Bresete in eadem de redditu xij^ ob. 

de francia. 

Terriers. 

There are Terriers preserved in the Diocesan Registry at Norwich for the 
following years: 1633, 1677, 1706, 1709, 1716, 1723, 1725, 1729, 1735, 1740, 
1747. 1753. 1760, 1763, 1770, 1777, 1784, 1791, 1794, 1801, 1806, 1813, 1820, 
1827, 1834, 1845, 1865, 1872, 1879, 1894. They are all on parchment, except 
that for 1872, which is on paper. The 1633 Terrier is not signed by the Rector; 
1677 and 1706 are signed by William Copinger as Rector; 17 16 to 1740 inclusive 
are signed by Thomas Hill as Rector ; 1747 and 1820 are signed by Henry Hill as 
Rector; 1827 and 1845 by Charles Green; 1865 by Copinger Hill, and 1872, 
1879, and 1894 by Henry Hill as Rector. 

The Terrier for 1706 is the first in which the Church goods are referred to — 
among them are 2 pewter flagons, i silver cup, and a silver plate. In 1709 the two 
pewter flagons are still there, with a cup and a silver chalice, and the same in 
1716. 

In 1709 the glebes and profits were worth at the improved value communibus 
annis ^100 a year, and in 1723 /[150. In 1723 the silver cup and salver weighed 
about 7 ounces. In 1725 tithes £\i\^ 2 pewter flagons, i silver cup about 5 oz. ; 
in 1729, tithes ;^I20, at which figure they remain for some years. In 1735 2 
pewter flagons, a silver salver about 2 oz. and silver cup about 5 oz. In 1747 tithes 
^120, silver cup and 2 silver plates weighed 16 oz. In 1760 one pewter flagon ; 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 63 

in 1834, Registers first mentioned and inaccurately said to date from 1695. In 
1865, silver flagon, silver cup, and two silver plates. 

As samples of the Terriers copies of the first of 1633 and of the last, 1894, are 
here given : — 

Terrier of 1633. 

A Terrier of all the Gleab landes 
Buxhall medowes gardens Orchards and 

Houses belonginge to the p'sonage 
of Buxhall as followeth, taken 
the 24"' day of June 1633. 

Imprimis, One Close called by the name of Sanddy land conteyninge by estimacion 

two acres and a halfe whether it be more or lesse the East head thereof 

abbutteth upon purplepool : — 
Item One other peece lyinge betwene the landes of John Mothams conteyninge by 

estimacion one acre more or lesse the west head thereof abbutteth upon the 

manno"^ of Buxhall hall in the tenure of Rychard martin : — 
Item One other peece of land conteyninge by estimacion dimid : acre more or lesse 

abbutteth upon purple hill towards the South : — 
Item One other peece called blackmans conteyninge by estimacion two acres more or 

lesse the North end thereof abbutteth upon the lands of Rychard Martin called 

Walles medowe : — 
Item One other peece of land lyinge in a field called Slyders conteyninge by 

estimacion thre acres more or lesse and abbutteth upon the lands of William 

Copinger Esq' est and west ; — 
Item One peece of land called by the name of Bedwell conteyning by estimacion six 

acres more or lesse abbutteth upon the lands of Robert Garner towards the 

West : — 
Item One medowe called by the name of Bedwell medowe conteyninge by estimacion 

one acre more or lesse abbutteth upon the North head upon the lands of 

Robt Browne : — 
Item One peece of land called Mantletts conteyninge by estimacion foure acres and a 

halfe more or lesse abbutteth upon a lane the west head upon Cogmans lane. 
Item One peice of land in a field called by the name of Martin field conteyning 

by estimacion one acre more or less abbutteth upon the lands of William 

Copinger Esq"^ upon the South : — 



64 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Item One peece of land called by the name of Cockerells conteyninge by estimacion 
three acres more or lesse abbutteth upon the lands of Charles Fecye gent upon 
the North and upon the South of the seyd Charles Fecye : — 

Item Two peecs of land lyinge in a field called by the name of Inmans conteyninge 
by estimacion eyght acres more or lesse abbutteth one peece thereof upon the 
kings hyghway leadinge from Buxhall to Finborowe and the other peece 
abbutteth the west head thereof upon a waye leadinge to Bradbrooke street. 

Item One peece of land called Inmans yeard conteyninge by estimacion one acre more 
or lesse abbutteth upon the hygheway leadinge from Stowmarkett towards the 
Lavenham towards the North : — 

Item One garden, with a Dovehouse called Inmans garden, conteyninge by estimacion 
one Roode abbutteth upon Inmans yeard towards the West : — 

Item One Orchard called by the name of Inhams conteyninge by estimacion dimid : 
acre more or lesse abbutteth upon the kings hyghewaye leadinge from Buxhall 
to Fynborowe towards the East :— 

The Parsonage houses as followeth : — 

Item The hall howse, two parlors, one kitchin, one backhouse, three Barnes, one 
stable, one dayre house, one garden, one orchard adioyninge to the Churchyard 
conteyninge by estimacion two acres more or lesse. 

We the Minister * * Churchwardens and Sidemen of Buxhall 

have hereunto subscribed our names Richard Martin and Thomas Nun 
Churchw'. Richard Syer, John Motham his mark x, William Syer. 

Terrier of 1894. 

A True Terrier of the House, Buildings, Glebelands, Tithe Rent Charge and 
Goods belonging to the Rectory and Parish Church of Buxhall in the county of 
Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich, taken according to the old evidence and knowledge 
of the Inhabitants and exhibited at the Primary Visitation of the Right Rev. Father 
in God John Lord Bishop of Norwich, holden at Ipswich on June 25, 1894 : — 

First a dwelling house with brick front and tiled (about 70 X 30 feet) with 
backhouse and offices adjoining brick and slated (about 45 X 25 feet) stables and 
coach house with hay loft over covered with reed, some small sheds in the yard and 
garden with land as set forth in the following extract from the Tithe Commutation 
Map in the occupation of the Rector and W. Williams executors : — 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 65 



569. Garden ... o 3 28 552. Inham's 

570. House, Build- 1 arable 12 3 33 

ings and j 552*. Plantation ... o o 37 

yards ... o i 37 i 553. Edgar's arable 3 i 22 



571. Plantation ... 17 

572. Church and 

yard ... o 2 36 



554. Bed wells ...10 3 29 

555. Home Lawn 5 3 32 
555\ Plantation ... 004 



556. Dove House 

meadow... 2 i 2 
497". Plantation ... o o 34 
559. Piece in Hall 

meadow... o o 36 

38 I 27 



The Tithes of the Parish have been commuted at £6So. A True account of 
the Goods belonging to the Church : One silver flagon, one silver cup, two silver 
plates in weight about 3 lbs. Av., one crimson cloth for the Communion table, one 
cloth as reredos, one cushion to the altar rail, two carved oak chairs and two stools, 
three linen napkins, four large Prayer books, one large Bible, eight register books, 
two stoves with piping. Five bells varying in weight from 7-15 cwt. and a Clock. 

There is a legacy of 20s. a year left by the Will of Mark Salter bearing date 
August 30, 1 61 5, and the interest on ;^i48 4s. lod. Consols left by the will of 
Elizabeth Sparke Garnham bearing date April 30, 1832, which sums are distributed 
yearly in the purchase of coals to the poor of the parish. 

The Sexton is appointed by the Rector, and paid ^2 12s. annually by the Parish. 
The South wall and West wall and iron fence of the Churchyard is kept up by 
the Parish, the North and East sides by the Rector. 

{Signed) Henry Hill, Rector. 



Robert Williams 
William Mitson 
Eugene J. Wells. 
R. J. Pettiward. 



Churchwardens. 



Parish Officers 

Contractions 

Churchwardens, C.W. ; Overseers, O. ; Guardians for the Union, G. ; Surveyors 
of Highway for the Parish, S. ; Assessors, A. ; Constables, C. Where the same 
officers were elected for subsequent years their names are not repeated, and it must 
be understood that the last named served until other officers were chosen in 
their place. 

10 



66 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1663. Robert Gooderick and John Goddard, C.W. 

1668. John Hey ward and William Micklefield, C.W. 

1669. Anthony Smyth and John Hey ward, C.W. 

1670. Thomas Pilbrow and Thomas Grimwood, C.W. 

1 67 1. Thomas Pilbrow and [Robert Richer], C.W. 

1672. Robert Richer and Thomas Pilbrow, C.W. 

1675. Anthony Le Straing and Thomas Vice, C.W. 

1676. Richard Darcy and Thomas Chaplyn, C.W. 

1678. Edmund Griggs and Robert Penninge, C.W. 

1679. Joseph Wood and Robert Penninge, C.W. 

1680. William Mathew and Edmund Lever, C.W. 

1 68 1. Joseph Wood and Edmund Lever, C.W. 

1682. Henry Copinger and John Malty ward, C.W. 

1696. Thomas Smith and Edward Griggs, C.W. 

17 19, Mar. 23. Gregory Coppinger, jun., and John Goddard, C.W. 

1723, April 15. Gregory Copinger and Edward Gripps, C.W. 

1724, April 6. Gregory Copinger, jun., and Thomas Brooke, C.W. 

1725, Mar. 29. Gregory Copinger and John Goddard, C.W. 
1727, April 5. Gregory Copinger and Anthony Osbourn, C.W. 
1729, April 7. Gregory Copinger and Anthony Osborn, C.W. 

Gregory Copinger and Dr. Hill, O. 

1 73 1, April 19. Gregory Copinger and William Grimwood, O. 

1732, April 10. Gregory Copinger and Thomas Brooke, C.W. 

1733, Mar. 26. Gregory Copinger and John Gladwell, C.W. 

Thomas Poole and Gregory Copinger, O. 
1735, April 7. Gregory Copinger and Thomas Poole, C.W. 

1737, April II. Gregory Copinger and Thomas Fuller, C.W. 

1738, April 3. Gregory Copinger, C.W. and O. 

1 76 1. Anthony Fuller and Thomas Poole, C.W. 

1793-4. Thomas Jolly and John Burnes, S. 

1794-5. John Barnes and Robt. Ward, S. 

1795-6. Thos. Stearn and Robt. Ward, S. 

1796-7. Thos. Stearn and Joseph Cooper, S. 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 67 

1797-8. Daniel Jewers and Joseph Cooper, S. 
1798-9. Daniel Jewers and Robt. Fuller, S. 
1 7 99- 1 800. Robt. Fuller and John Stearn. 
1 800-1. John Stearn and Charles Oxor, S. 
1 801-2. Chas. Oxor and Isaac Grimwood, S. 
1802-3. Isaac Grimwood and William Kemball, C.W. 
1803-4. Wm. Kemball and Joseph Cooper. 
Robert Ward and John Richer. 

1806, April 7. Robert Ward and John Richer, C.W. ; Lankester Freeman 

and William Hunt, O. ; Edmund Thurlow and William 
Spink, C. 

1 807, Mar. 30. Benjamin Cole and Joseph Cooper, S. ; Jos. Cooper and 

John Barnes, O. ; Edmund Thurlow and Thos. Stearn, C. 

Joseph Cooper, jun., and William Kemball, O. 

Charles Oxor and Benjamin Cole, S. ; Charles Oxor and 

Benjamin Cole, O. 

John Richer and Isaac Grimwood, O. 

Rev. Chas. Green, Robert Fuller, otherwise Godbolds, O. 

John Richer and Benj. Cole, C.W. 

Rev. H. Hill and Robt. Borey, O. 

Thos. Stearn and Robt. Clarke, O. 

Robt. Clarke and Chas. Basham, O. 

William Hunt and Isaac Cooper, O. 

John Barnes and William Kemball, O. 

Chas. Oxor and Benj. Cole, O. 

John Richer and Isaac Grimwood, O. 

Rev. Chas. Green and Frances Jane Fuller, O ; Edmd. 

Thurlow and William Spink, jun., O. 

John Spink and Isaac Clover, O. ; James Purr and Saml. 
Cracknell, C. ; Thos. Dykes and John Barnes, A. ; Mary 
Borey and Robt. O. Fuller, S. 
829, Mar. 24. William Spink and Thos. Stearn, C.W. ; William Kemball 
and Mary Borey, O. ; John Barnes and Nelson Hatten, A. 
Robt. O. Fuller and Wm. Spink, S. 



1808, 


April 


18. 


1809, 


April 


3- 


I8I0, 


April 


23- 


I8II, 


April 


15- 


I8I2, 


Mar. 


20. 


I8I3, 


April 


19. 


I 8 14, 


April 


1 1. 


1815, 


Mar. 


27. 


1816, 


April 


16. 


1817, 


April 


17- 


1818, 


Mar. 


23- 


1819, 


April 


3- 


1828, 


Mar. 


25- 



68 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1830, Mar. 23. William Kemball and William Spink, C.W. ; John Fuller 

and George Davey, O. 

1 83 1, Mar. 29. James Cutting and William Hunt, O. ; Nelson Hatten and 

George Davey, A. ; William Spink and John Fuller, S. 

1832, Mar. 20. Thos. Dykes and John Barnes, O. ; George Davey and 

James [Bray] Cutting, A. ; John Fuller and Wm. Kemball, S. 

1833, Mar. 19. Robert Cooper Smith and Thomas Pike, O. ; William 

Kemball and Nelson Hatten, S. 

1834, Mar. 25. Nelson Hatten and Robt. Bradley, O. ; John Fuller and 

William Spink, A. ; Nelson Hatten and Thomas Dykes, S. 

1835, Mar. 24. William Spink, sen., and James Bradbrook, O. ; William 

Spink, sen., and William Spink, jun., A. • Thomas Dykes 
and Robt. Cooper Smith, S. ; William Kemball, G. 

1836, Mar. 21. William Kemball and Joseph Sturgeon, O. ; William Spink, 

jun., and George Mumford, A. ; Robert Cooper Smith and 
Nelson Hatten, S. ; William Spink, G. 

1837, Mar. 23. John Fuller and Frederick Melton, O. ; George Mumford 

and William Spink, jun., A. ; Nelson Hatten and William 
Spink, sen., S. ; George Mumford, G. 

1838, Mar. 20. Nelson Hatten and George Mumford, O. ; James Purr 

and Robert Bradley, C. ; George Mumford and William 
Kemball, A. ; William Spink, jun., and Frederick Melton, 
S. ; Nelson Hatten, G. 

1839, Mar. 27. Frederick Melton, G. ; John Barnes and Thomas Dykes, 

O. ; William Kemball and Saml. Cracknell, A. ; Fred. 
Melton and Isaac Clover, S. 

1 840, Mar. 20. Morris Pike and Thos. Pilgrim, O. ; Isaac Clover and 

William Kemball, S. ; Samuel Cracknell and Frederick 
Melton, A. ; Jeremiah Cropley, G. 

1 84 1, March William Spink and Samuel Cracknell, O. ; William Kemball 

and Jeremiah Cropley, S. ; Frederick Melton and Isaac 
Clover, A. ; William Kemball, G. 

1842, Mar. 18. Rev. C. Hill and William Kemball, O. ; Isaac Clover and 

Jeremiah Cropley, A. ; William Spink, G. ; Jeremiah 
Cropley and Samuel Cracknell, S. 

1843, March Nelson Hatten and James Goreham, O. ; Samuel Cracknell 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 6g 

and Rev. Copinger Hill, S. ; James Purr and John Barnes, 
C. ; Thomas Pilgrim, G. 

1844, Mar. 25. John Barnes and Jeremiah Cropley, O. ; Rev. Copinger 

Hill and John RufFel, S. ; James Purr and William 
Kemball, jun., C. ; Samuel Cracknell, G. 

1845, Mar. 24. N. Hatten, G. ; W. Kemball, jun., and T. Clover, O. ; 

J. Ruffell and T. Pilgrim, S. ; James Purr and F. 
Goram, C. 

1846, Mar. 18. J. RufFell, G. ; Frederick Melton and Robt. Langham, O. ; 

Thos. Pilgrim and R. O. Fuller, S. ; James Purr and 
Wm. Kemball, jun., C. 

Thomas Pilgrim and James Bradbrook, O. ; R. O. Fuller 
and William Spink, S. 

William Spink and Nelson Hatten, C.W. ; William 
Kemball, jun., G. ; Thos. Dykes and Thos. Richer, O. ; 
William Spink and Nelson Hatten, S. 

John Ruffell, G. ; William Dykes and Jno. G. Gage, O. ; 
Thomas Stearn and Edwd. Crosley, S. 
24. Isaac Clover and F. R. Melton, A. ; James Purr and 
James Bradbrook, O. ; Edward Crosley and William 
Boulter, S. ; John G. Gage and Samuel Nunn, C. 

23. Thomas Stearn, G. ; W. Pearman and Thomas Stearn, O. ; 
Mr. Boulter and Mr. Melton, S. 

24. Mrs. Anne Pike and John Ennals, O. ; F. R. Melton and 
John Ennals, S. 

24. John Ennals and Mr. Carter, O. 

Thos. Ruffell, G. ; Wm. Kemball, jun., and Mrs. Spink, 
O. ; James Dykes and John Ennals, S. 
1862, April 21. Joseph Brand and William Kemball, jun., C.W. ; James 
Dykes and Joseph Brand, S. 
Joseph Brand and William Boulter, S. 
William Boulter and F. R. Melton, S. 
Thos. Howe, S. 
Thos. Stearn and J. Clover, S. 
Joseph Brand and William Boulter, C.W. 
Robert John Cockrill and William Boulter, C.W. 



1848, 


Mar. 


1856, 


Mar. 


1857, 


Mar. 


1858, 


Mar. 


1859, 


Mar. 


i860, 


Mar. ' 


1861, 


March 



1863. 




1864. 




1866. 




1867. 




1868, 


April 


1871, 


Easter. 



70 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Extracts from Churchwardens' Accounts. 
The disbursements of Robt. Ward and John Richer, Churchwardens for 
Parish of Buxhall. From Mich^ 1804 to Michaelmas, 1805, as followeth : — 



the 



Oct. 28. 


P" for A Form of Prayer 


Dec. 26. 


Washing the Surplice 


„ 29. 


P^'for Bread and Wine 


1805, Jan. 24. 


P'' for a form of Prayer for a fast 


April II. 


Bread and Wine ... 




Washing Surplice ... 


May 6. 


P'* for a Citation 


„ 28. 


P" the Court fees 




P" Mr. Hill's fee 




Expenses at the generals ... 


» 29. 


Washing Surplice, Table Cloth and 




Bread and Wine 




P'' for Sparrows and Eggs... 




P'' for new binding and mending the 


Sept. 28. 


P'' for a Citation ... 


Oct- 20. 


P^ for Bread and Wine 




Washing Surplice ... 


„ 26. 


P^' the Court fees 


^ 


P^for Hill's fee 




P" for a new Book 




Expenses at the generals ... 




P^'the Clerks Salary 




P^ the Sexton do. . , . 




P-* Gates for the Church Clock .. 




P" Mills for a new Clock line .. 




P' do. for 12 Dorses ... 


Oct. 26. 


P"* for 4 Ringing Days 




P" the Carpenters Bill 




P'' the Smiths do 




Making rate 



Desk 



Napk 



Hangings 



Rate and Town Stock 



Disbursements 



Town Stocks 



I 





5 





3 





I 





5 


2 


10 


6 


10 





4 


6 


5 





13 


8 


2 


6 


I 





5 





3 





4 


6 


7 


6 


7 





10 





10 





18 





7 


6 


4 


10 


I 





10 





6 


5 




3 


2 






The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 71 

Buxhall April 7, 1806. At a Vestry Meeting held this day the 
following Persons were chosen officers for the said Parish for the year 
ensuing : 

Robt. Ward ] „, , , Lankester Freeman ) 

-.,_., r Churchwardens. ^,^.,, ^-. Overseers. 

John Richer ) Will'" Hunt ) 

Edw'' Thurlow ) _ , , 
Will"' Spink /Constables. 

August 27, 1806, the Girl Mary Frost was allotted to Mr. Hill 
for the 3rd year. The Boy John Codd to Mr. Rt. Ward 2nd year, and 
the Boy Rt. Bowie to Mr. Thos. Steam ; the Boy being young was 
afterwards returned to the House. 

The same style of entry runs throughout the book, and a few exceptional 
entries are given below : — 

£ s. d. 

1807. P"* Thos. Sparrow for taking down the old Vestry 

Walls 5 J rod at 25' rod ... ... ... 7 39 

Do. Stone Work at the Vestry 2 Rodd and 193 feet 

at 34 p. rd.... ... ... ... ... ... 412 I 

Allowance for Beer at 3. 6. ... ... ... ... 16 i 

Digging the Foundations at 8d. 4 yds. and 8 feet ... 2 10^ 

To 21 yds. of lath and Plastering at is. ^d. per yd. i 16 9 
To 29 feet of Course project and Battlements at 3d. 

per foot ... ... ... ... ... ... 73 

To 117 feet Tiling at 4d. square ... ... ... 48 

28 yds. rendering at fd. ... ... ... ... 11 8 

8 yds. and ^ flat paving and allowance at 5d. ... 36^ 

P"^ per 1679 yds. whitening to Church at ijd. per yard 4 4 10 

104 yds. Colouring at 2d. ... ... ... ... i? 4 

P'' for work at the Belfry and other jobs at the 

Church ... ... ... ... ... ... I 12 2 

Mr. Chas. Oxer for 2 loads of wash sand and 

Carriage from Woolpit ... ... ... ... 12 o 

To 100 Bush''' of Lime from Coddenham ... ... i 5 o 

To 2 Loads of Gravil from Finborough ... ... 80 



72 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1807. To a Letter from Isleham 

To 100 Bush'' of Lime from do. 

P'' Carriage of the same 

P'' the Carpenters Bill for Vestry and Allowance 

P'' for 2 8 feet of kneelers at the Altar 

P'' the Carpenter's Bill for work at the Church and 

Churchyard ... 
P'' Mr. Oxer for carriage of Bricks from Woolpit 
Do. Wash Sand i Load from Onehouse 
Do. Tiles from Needham 
Do. Old Lead to Stowmarket ... 
P"* for 100 Bush Lime at gd. ... 
P'' the Glaziers Bill for the Vestry 
Do. for the Church 

P'' for 217 Patent Tiles for Vestry ... 
P'' the Blacksmiths Bill for the Job at the Clock 

P^ Mr. Martin for sand 

P'' Tucker for 2 Loads of Gravil 

Journey and Expenses Mr. Ward and self after wash 

sand and to Stowmarket selling the old lead 
P'' Mr. Thos. Howe for measuring and valueing the 

work at the Church and Vestry ... 
P'" Lockwood attending the Visitors 8 June 1807 



[o 6 
I o 



Jan. 12, 1809. Rec" of Mr. Robt. Fuller late Godbolds land £1 i6s., of Mr. 
Joseph Cooper £1 14s., and of Mr. John Barnes los., in all 
4 Pounds being the gift money left by the Will of Mark Salter 
to the Poor of the Parish of Buxhall for ever, which sum 
is for Four years ending on the nth day of Octr. 1808. 



1808, May 28. Expenses going the Perambulation 

October 27. P'' for Cleaning the Church Clock 

1809, April 27, Spent on the Young People at the Confirmation 

P'' for cleaning Gravil round the Church 
P"* for Sparrows and Eggs 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 73 



October 9. 

May. 
May 3. 

. Jan. 13- 



181 1, October 10, 



1815, 
1815, 



1816, 
1821, 



July 2. 
August 3. 



June 10. 
March 23. 



1822, 


June 7. 


1826, 


June. 


1829, 


March 24. 



Ringing at the Jubalee ... ... ... ... 12 o 

P'' for Cleaning the Church Clock ... ... ... 76 

P'' Half the expenses settleing the Boundaries 
Between the Parishes of Buxhall and Gt. Finborrow 113 o 
Rec'' of Mr. Robt. Fuller for late Godbolds land 9 shillings, of 
Mr. Jos'' Cooper 8s. 6d., of Mr. John Barnes 2S. 6d., in all 
I Pound, being the gift money left by the Will of Mark 
Salter, to the Poor of the Parish of Buxhall for ever, which 
sum is for one year ending on the iith Day of Oct. 1809, 
which sum was distributed to the Poor in Coals. 

. P"* for part of the Stones for the Boundaries of the 

Parish of Buxhall and Gt. Finborough 5 8 o 

Mr. Jos'' Cooper for carriage of y'= Stones ... ... 26 

P'' for 1 Dozen of Hassocks in 6 

P" for Cleaning the Church Clock 76 

P'' for a Form of Prayer for a Victory at Waterloo i o 

P'* for a letter from the Bishop of Norwich for a 
subscription at Waterloo ... ... ... ... 10 

P'' for a New Pall 2 10 o 

P'' for a New Folio Prayer Book ... ... ... 212 o 

At this Meeting it was agreed for the overseers to serve the 
Office by Rotation and to be allowed Five Pounds a year 
from the Parish and also to have a meeting to dine once a 
year at Finborough White Horse the Parish to allow Three 
Pounds a year towards the expense. 

Henry Hill G^forge Davey Benjn. Cole John Richer 

Wm. Hunt Thos. Stearn Wm. Kemball Thos. Stearn jr. 

John Fuller Isaac Cooper Isaac Grimwood John Barnes 

P"^ for a Letter about the Distressed Irish... ... 10 

P'' for an Iron Chest for the Church ... .... 2 10 o 

At a Vestry meeting held this Day it was unanimously agreed 
by us the undersigned Parishoners of the said Parish to have 
the rough of the Church sealed, the walls white washed and 
couloured the Pulpit Desk and Pewes painted at the expense of 
the Parish the Rev. Mr. Chas. Green agreeing to be the sum of 
Five Pounds towards the expence. Chas. Green, John Richer, Wm. 



74 



October 



1830, April 18. 
1832, June 10. 

1833, 

1836, October i. 

1837, June. 
1839, Jan. 12. 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Kemball, Thos Stearn, William Spink Junr., Mr. George 

Nelson Hatten, James Purr, Charles Scarf his x mark. 

P. Beetons Bill for Painting the Church 

P'' Sparrows Bill for Ceiling the Church .. 

Painting Church Doors 

P"* for flinging snow ... 

Councillors Opinion ... 

Journey to Bury 

Mr. Purrs winding up church clock' 

P'' Going Bounds of the Parish 

Proclamation 

Received at Alexanders Bank the dividends of the 

Gift of the late Elizabeth Sparke Garnham the sum 

of which was distributed in to the poor 

P'' Ringers Queen's Marriage... 

P"* for Prayer for Oueen 

P'' for Prayer for Good Crops 

P'' Mr. Merryweather of London for a Fire Engine 

per Contract 

Mr. Merryweather for the Fire Engine 

P'' Mr. Merryweather for new Junction Pipe 

I year rent Engine House ... 



Davey, 



... II 14 


7 


... 28 II 


10 


4 


6 




6 


I I 





5 





... I 5 





2 II 


6 


2 






10 




I 





I 





64 19 





I 5 


3i 


2 





5 






1840, Feb. 10. 

1842, June II. 

Oct. 2. 

1847, March 16. 

April 16. 
Aug. 
Sept. 

At a Vestry Meeting held this 24th day of March, 1849, i*^ was agreed that a 
Brick Wall be built against the Church yard (next Mr. Kemball's orchard) 116 feet 
long, the foundation to be 18 inches in the Ground, 12 inches deep with 14 inch 
work and 4 feet high of 9 inch work, and 9 inch saddle coping set in cement. I 
hereby offer and agree to execute the above wall in a sound and workmanlike 
manner and find all materials labour and carriage for the sum of Twenty-two 
pounds, the Bricks to be good sound hard Kiln Burned red Bricks. 

Fran. Sparrow. 



1851. 

1851, 



May. 
December. 



Received of Mr. James Purr 
Engine at Mr. Gage's Fire 
Beer for men working engine... 
Purr for Fire Engine ... 



for use of Fire £ 



' This had heretofore appeared as Repairing Church Clocic 7s. 6d. In many years subsequently 
both items appear together. 



The Church, the Rectory, and the Parsons thereof 75 

1853, March 28. At a Vestry Meeting held this day it was agreed that application 
be made to the Board of Guardians by the Guardian and Overseer 
for permission to appoint a permanent and paid Collector of rates 
at a salary of ^^8 per annum. It was also agreed that the 
Overseer be requested to reduce the assessment rateably. And 
the Meeting is of opinion that somewhere about is. 5d. would be 
a fair valuation. It was also agreed that fractions be struck of 
the assessment so as to make a Collection on a penny rate 
possible. 

1855, April 9. At a Vestry Meeting held this day it was agreed that the old 
P'ence on the West side of the Churchyard be taken down and 
a new Iron Fence substituted at a cost of £11. 

Purr ^14 15 o for Iron fence 
Thurlow 7 5 o for oak posts, fixing, and fixing Iron fence 
/^22 o o 
December 30. Hopsons Bill repairing Belfry steps ... ... ... 200 

1859, April 25. At a Vestry Meeting held this Day on a motion being made for 
a rate it was opposed by Mr. Melton and the Meeting was 
adjourned to May loth 1859. At the adjourned Meeting held 
May loth a rate of 3d. in the pound was proposed, seconded and 
carried by a majority of 12 for and 3 against. A Poll was 
demanded by Mr. Melton which was at once commenced and 
closed according to resolution of vestry the numbers being 98 for 
and 20 against. 

1873. Building n^v^ Church wall ... ... ... ... ^25 o o 

At end of book is the following entry : — 

At a Vestry Meeting (held on the 15th day of June, 1844) of the Parlshoners 
of the Parish of Buxhall, the following Resolution was drawn up by the 
Rev. Coppinger Hill and signed by the undermentioned occupiers — 

This is a Correct Copy of the Original which can be found In the Iron Chest. 

John Ruffell] ^, , , 

I Churchwardens, 



76 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Resolved, by the following persons present and authority given by the 
absent to the Churchwardens to act for them. 

That an Engine be purchased, the property of it to be vested in the 
Churchwardens for Ever. And that towards the expenses a rate of 6d. in the 
pound be levied. 

Revd. Charles Green, Rector. 
„ Coppinger Hill. 

William Kemball 

William Spink 

Thomas Pilgrim 

John Barnes 

John Ruffell 

Samuel Cracknell 

Nelson Hatten 

Sarah Hunt - Inhabitants. 

Isaac Clover 

F. R. Melton 

Thomas Dykes 

James Purr 

Jeremiah Cropley 

James Goram 

John Spink 

William Kemball, jun. 



CHAPTER III 
The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 

(i) Generally as to Jurisdiction. 

MANY and discordant have been the conjectures as to the etymology of the 
word manor,' but it is probably derived from mesner, signifying "to govern" 
or " to guide," because the lord of a manor has the guidance and direction of 
all his tenants within the limits of his territory : " And this," says Lord Coke, " I 
hold the most probable etymology and most agreeing with the nature of a manor, 
for a manor in these days signifies the jurisdiction and royalty incorporate, rather 
than the land or site." ~ This etymology accords with the nature of the thing. 
The chief or prince in most ages and nations possessed the civil with the military 
power. The baron led his tenants to war and administered justice among 
them in peace. His jurisdiction was commensurate with his territory. His 
tenants assembled in his Aula, " Hall," or Court where justice and equity were 
dispensed. The Court, called the hall-mote from the place in which it was held, or 
the Court Baron from the territory to which it belonged, was absolutely incident to 
the manor. It was its very essence and appertained to it of necessity, just as the 
suit of Court, or the obligation of attendance, was inseparably incident to the fief. 
Here justice was administered — not only by compelling the payment of debts and 
the performance of contracts, but also by redressing wrongs and punishing crimes. 
In the Court Baron 3 the suitors were judges ; the freeman could only be tried by 
his equals. Again, the lord had a court for his villeins who held at his will by 
copy, for the suitors in the Court Baron could not notice the claims of the villeins, 
who were a different order. In the Court of the Copyholders, or Customary Court, all 
the matters relative to the tenements held by copy were transacted. The lord him- 

• See Spelraan's gloss, voce Manerum ; Coke's "Copyholds," § 31 ; Perkins, § 670. 

2 "Copyholds," § 41. 

3 A Treatise concerning a Manor and Court Baron will be found in Harl. MSS. 6714 and 7371. 



78 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

self, or his steward, who sat for hini was the judge of these courts. To the 
Customary Court the copyholders owed suit as the free tenants did to the Court 
Baron, and, like the latter, were denominated the homage — not indeed that the 
copyholders ever did homage expressly, as the free tenants did, for homage could 
only be done by a free man. The copyholders did fealty. The Court Rolls 
show how the little community was governed, what power was vested in the lord, 
how bakers and alesellers were regulated by " the Assize of Bread and Ale " and 
punished by fineo and by stocks, how every inhabitant was bound to do suit 
and service, by attendance at least at the Leet Court, and nothing scarcely was 
too large, certainly nothing too small, for presentation to and adjudication by 
the Court Leet jury. 

The ancient local court in Saxon times was the County Court, with View of 
Frank-pledge. This was held once every four weeks for civil and criminal 
business. In this the Sheriff presided, but the suitors of the Court as they were 
called, that is, the freemen and landholders of the county, were the judges, and 
the Sheriff was to execute the judgment, assisted, if need be, by the Bishop. 
Once a year at the Easter Tourn or Circuit, the Sheriff and the Bishop were to 
hold also a View of Frank-pledge. Since the time of Edgar this court seems to 
have been divided into two, the criminal matters, both ecclesiastical and civil, 
and also the View of Frank-pledge were despatched in one court, called the 
Tourn (i.e., Circuit), from the Bishop and Sheriff's going circuit through the 
county, and the civil business in another called the County Court. There was 
also the Hundred Court held monthly over ten tithings of ten families each, 
and the Tithing or Decennary Court presided over by the borsholder or tithing- 
man. The Frank-pledge or tithing consisted of ten households, and the master of 
each of these ten families was bound every one for the other, and for one another's 
family, that each man of their family should stand to the Law, or if he were 
not forthcoming that they should answer for the injury or offence. The Court 
in which the misdemeanors of these men were at first punished, but subsequently 
only presented, was the Sheriff's Turn which in process of time for convenience 
were kept in every hundred. The style of the Court was the View or Court of 
Franc-pledges or Freemen cast into Tithings, which View of Free Pledges was also 
for convenience granted to lords of manors by the King to have the view of 
tenants and residents within their manors. 

Old William Lambard in his " Duties of Constables, Borsholders, Tythingmen 
and such other lowe and lay ministers of the Peace" (London, 16 14) gives a good 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 79 

account of the View of Frank-pledge and the officers connected with it. He says : 
" By the ancient lawes of this realme (before the comming in of King Willia 
the Conquerour) it was ordained for y'' more sure keeping of the Peace, and for 
the better repression of theeues and robbers, y' all free borne men should cast them- 
selues into seuerall companies, of ten in each companie, and that euery of those ten 
men of the companie, should be suretie and pledge for the forth-coming of his 
fellowes : so that if any harme were done by any of these ten against the peace, 
then the rest of the ten should be amerced, if he of their company that did the 
harme should flie, and were not foorth-comming to answere to that wherewith he 
should be charged. And for this cause, these companies be yet in some places of 
England (and namely with us in Kent) called Boroes, of the said word Borhes, 
Pledges, or sureties : albeit in the westerne parts of this Realme they be commonly 
named Tythings because they containe (as I told you) the number of ten men with 
their families. And euen as ten times ten do make an hundred ; so because it was 
then also appointed that ten of these companies should at certaine times meete 
together for their matters of greater waight, therefore that general assembly (or 
court) was (and yet is) called a Hundred. Furthemore it was the also ordained 
that if any man were of so evill credit that he could not get himselfe to be received 
into one of thesi Tythings or Boroes then he should bee shut up in prison, as a 
man unworthy to live at libertie amongst men 'abroad. Now whereas every of these 
Tithings (or Boroes) did use to make choise of one man amongst theselues, to 
speak, and to do in the name of them all, he was therefore in some places called the 
Tythingman, in other places the Boroes Elder (whom we now call Borsholder) 
in other places the Borohead or Headborow, and in some other places the 
chiefe pledge, which last name doth plainly expound the other three that are 
next before it ; for Head or Elder of y'' Boroes and chiefe of the pledges, be all 
one And in some shires where euerie Thirdbarrow hath a Costable, there the officers 
of the other two be called Thirdborowes. Moreover in these Tithings (or Boroes) 
sundrie good orders were obseruer, and amongst others ; first, that euerie man of 
the age of xii yeares should be sworne to the King ; then that no man should be 
suffered to dwell in any towne or place unless he were also received into some such 
suretiship and pledge as is aforsaid. Thirdly y' if any of these pledges were 
imprisoned for his offence then he ought not to be deliuered without the assent of 
the rest of his pledges. Again, that no man might remoue out of one Tithing (or 
Boroe) to dwel in another without lawful warrat in that behalf. Lastly that euerie 
of these pledges should yearely be presented and brought forth by their Chiefe pledge 



8o History of the Parish of Buxhall 

at a general assembly for that purpose, which we yet in remembrance thereof do cal 
the View of Frankepledge, or the Leet Court " (p. 6). 

The principle of suretyship was the very foundation of the principles of Anglo- 
Saxon jurisprudence — no doubt borrowed from the Lombards. We find that King 
Edgar required that every man should be in surety both within and without the 
towns ; Canute that every freeman be brought within a hundred and into a Tithing ; 
and Edward the Confessor, that in all the vills throughout the kingdom all men 
should be in guarantee by tens, so that if one of the ten should offend, the other 
nine might hold him to right, or if wrong bring him to justice, before the court of 
freemen. The first William did not materially alter the nature of these courts and 
the process of change in their constitution and jurisdiction was gradual. The thirty- 
fourth provision of the Magna Carta of 1 2 1 5 was that certain writs should not 
deprive freemen of their right to the local jurisdiction of the Courts Leet and 
Baron. And after the Charter was embodied as a statute in the 9 Henry IIL, 
the 25 Edward I. c. 35 declared that the County Court should be held monthly, 
and the sheriff or his bailiff keep his Tourn but twice in the year and the View 
of Frank-pledge once, so that every man might have his liberties and that the 
tithing be wholly kept as accustomed. There can be no doubt that Lord Coke is 
right when he asserts that the Courts Leet were carved out of the Courts of the 
Tourn, " for the ease of the populace, that they should have justice done them at 
their own doors." "But," says Creasy,' "it is more probable that they were the 
original hundred courts of the Saxon timts, though the area of the manor often 
became the area of the jurisdiction, instead of the old area of the hundred. The 
right of holding a Court Leet was often granted to the lord of a manor, partly for 
the benefit of his tenants resident in the manor, and partly for the benefit of the 
lord himself : who besides the judicial authority and dignity which he gained, 
derived pecuniary advantages from the fines and fees of court. The criminal 
jurisdiction both of the tourn and the leet was reduced within somewhat narrow 
limits by the 24th clause of John's Magna Carta.- But these courts still continued 
to be of practical importance in many matters of local self-government. Besides the 
important duty of the View of Frank-pledge, the assembled inquest or jury of the 
leet inquired and made presentments respecting persons of notorious evil fame ; 
respecting cheats, especially with regard to vendors of unwholesome provisions ; 
respecting escapes from prisons, breaches of the peace, public nuisances, and many 

' " Rise and Progress of the English Constitution." 

= No sheriff, constable, coroner, or other our bailiffs shall hold picas of the Crown. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 8i 

other subjects. The Court Leet (or the Tourri) could impose a fine or amercement 
on any person who was prosecuted as an offender in any of these respects, and such 
fine or amercement could be levied by distress." 

The vill of Buxhall was a tithing in itself, and the tithing-man was here called 
the Headborough. The Manorial Court of Buxhall had not merely the right to 
execute the law of frank-pledge, to take the profits arising from this and to 
prevent the sheriff from meddling with the lord's tenants, but also the right to hold 
twice a year a Court Leet.' The lord of the manor swore in the body of jurors 
— often they were the chief pledges or heads of the tithings — and put before them 
those same "articles of the view" which the sheriff employed in his "tourn." The 
minor offences were punished on the spot by amercements which went to swell the 
lord's revenue. But probably the pecuniary profit was in the eyes of the lord a 
small matter when compared with the substantial power over his tenants which was 
thus secured. Twice a year the villagers, bond and free, had to report themselves 
and tell tales one of another, while no tale went outside the manor to the ears of 
jealous neighbours or rapacious officials. Probably the tenants also were the gainers 
by the franchise ; they could manage their own affairs without the interference of 
"foreigners." In whose name soever the Court Leet was held, it was accounted the 
King's Court, because the authority originally belonged to the Crown. = 

The lord had also the assize of bread and beer — the power ot enforcing 
the general ordinances fixing the prices at which these might be sold. There 
is an assize of bread from Henry II. 's reign, one from John's, another from 
Henry III., which two latter deal with beer also. Out of the beer the lords 
made considerable profit. 3 Ail who had brewed in the village against the assize 
were presented in the Manorial Court by the jurors. Consequent on this franchise 
were pillory and tumbrel, or ducking-stool, and so necessary were these judicialia, 

' The origin of the term Leet is not clear. The word was used in Domesday Boole and may 
possibly have relation to the division of the country for the purpose of taxation — from the Danish 
lecga described by Dr. Skeat as a division of the country (in Denmark) for military conscription 
(Round's "Feudal England," p. lo). 

Lord Coke derives the name " Leet " from the Saxon verb geldthim or gelcthian, to " assemble 
together;" others from liet, signifying judgment "because this court redressed wrongs by way of 
judgment against any person of ' the Frank-pledge who had done any wrong or injury to another." 
Others again derive it from the Saxon leod, " people," and hold it to mean the fopuli curia, or " folk- 
mote." Scriven derives it from the word let, "to assign" or grant, by reason of its being a juridical 
franchise, held by a subject under the Crown. Others consider the word to be leta from the Saxon 
lite, i.e., parvus, quasi, a little court, or from the German laet, a country judge. 

^ Kitchin, fol. 6. 

5 Pollock and Maitland, " Laws of England," i. 569. 

12 



82 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

or instruments of justice, that were they wanting the lord was liable to the loss 
of the franchise. The Court Rolls of Buxhall show that the body of persons 
who attended the Court, certainly in the time of Edward VI., represented the 
township. It was not merely the Court of the manor, but practically the Court 
of the vill — i.e., of the township. This may not have been the case in very early- 
times, for in the vill there were three other manors, but none of these had the right 
of view of frank-pledge. It was not the case of a chief and three sub-manors, for 
these other manors held Courts and had lands in demesne, freehold tenants and 
villeins, and each held of the king, tracing his title through a different series of mesne 
lords. The fact is clear from the Rolls that the Manorial Court governed the whole 
vill. The vill and township are usually taken to be synonymous, but the vtllata 
or township really answered to the tract of land and the villa or vill to the 
community or organised body of the inhabitants, a distinction not unfrequent in 
early documents. If a crime took place in the villa, the town of Buxhall, villata, 
the township of Buxhall was answerable. "An ordinance of 1233 provided that in 
every villa watch should be kept throughout the night by four men at the least. 
This was repeated in 1252, and at the same time new provision was made 
for enforcing the assize of arms. The original assize of 1181 had not treated 
the villata as an organised entity ; it had required that individuals should have the 
armour suitable to their station. The ordinance of 1252 decreed that in every town- 
ship a constable or two constables should be appointed and a chief constable in 
every hundred to convene the iurati ad arma. In 1253 this is supplemented by a 
provision that arms necessary for the pursuit of malefactors are to be provided at the 
cost of the township and are to remain to the use of the township. The whole 
system of the assize of arms and of watch and ward was consolidated and enforced 
in 1285 by the statutes of Winchester; the constabulary and the militia took the 
form that they were to keep during the rest of the Middle Ages." i The learned 
authors of the present text-book of the " History of the English Law" fully grasp 
the difficulty of accounting for the exercise of jurisdiction by the Manorial Court 
over the whole vill in cases where there were other manors within the same juris- 
diction, and they say referring to such a case : " How then were the internal affairs 
of the vill regulated ? It may seem to us that there we ought to be able to detect 
some organisation of the vill that is not manorial, not feudal, some 'township moot' 
or some intermanorial organisation. The township must have a reeve, the township 
must send four good men to Court, the township must capture felons and keep them 

' Pollock and Maitland, "Hist, of the English Law," i. 552. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 83 

in custody, the township must make all manner of payments, periodic and occa- 
sional. How can these duties be apportioned if there be no Court, assembly, 
governing body of the vill ? We have looked for such organisation in our 
documents without finding it."' 

The Court Leet of Buxhall Manor certainly exercised important functions in 
early days, and looked well after the morals and generally protected the interests of 
those within its precincts. The entries in the Court Rolls evidencing this are 
extremely numerous. A few extracts will show the nature of the jurisdiction 
exercised. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL I4, 27 EI,IZ. 

The Jurors present that all the inhabitants and residents within the precincts of 
this Leet are guilty of offences for not using caps on Sundays and feast days against 
the form of the Statute in such like cases lately edited and provided (Stat. 13 Eliz. 
c. 19). Therefore each of them in mercy for their individual offence in that behalf 
JJjs. i;ijd._2 

And that Robert Copinger gentleman George Dickenson clerk, John Salter 

' Pollock and Maitland, "Hist, of the English Law," i. 559. 

^ This for those days was an extremely heavy fine. As to wearing hats upon Sundays and holidays, 
the Act of 8 Eliz. cap. ii. (1565), intituled "An Act for uttering of caps, and for true making of hats 
and caps," in its preamble sets forth that "great multitudes of the Queen's Majesty's true subjects using 
the art of making woollen caps, are impoverished and decayed by the excessive use of hats and felts 
and thereby divers good cities and towns brought to desolation, great plenty of strange commodities with- 
out necessity consumed, and great number of people enforced to depend upon the having of foreign 
wools, to the discommodity of this realm, the disfurniture of service to be done to the queen's 
majesty, and greater evident dangers if remedy be not provided." The second section enacts that none 
shall work hats with foreign wool but such as have been apprentices to hat making. The third section 
prohibits making or selling caps of felt, or of any woollen cloth not knit. The fourth prescribes the 
thickening or fulling of caps. The fifth enacts "that no man under the degree of a knight, or of a lord's 
son, shall wear any hat or upper cap of velvet, or covered with velvet (los.) whereof one moiety shall 
be to the queen's majesty, and the other moiety to such person then using the feat of cap-making as 
will sue for the same in any court of record ; wherein no cssoign protection or wager of law, for 
the defendant, shall be admitted or allowed." This Act not being found sufficient to "protect" the 
cap-makers from the hat-wearers, another Act was passed in 1570 (13 Eliz. c. 19) which required 
that every person above the age of seven years should wear upon the Sabbath and holy day (unless 
in the time of their travels out of their towns, hamlets, &c.) upon their head a cap of wool, knit, 
thicked and dressed in England, made within this realm, and only dressed and finished by some of the 
trade of cappers (for every day 3s. 4d.), except maids, ladies, gentlewomen, noble personages, and every 
lord, knight and gentleman of twenty marks' land, and their heirs, and such as have borne office of 
worship in any city, borough, town, hamlet, or shire ; and the wardens of the worshipful companies of 
London. This Act was repealed by the 39 Eliz. c. 18, s. 45 (1597). 



84 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

son of Edward Salter, John Salter junior, Thomas Beamyshe, John Curtys, and 
Thomas Martyn are common players at unlawful games called " At Bowles " 
within the precincts of this Leet contrary to the form of the Statute in such 
like cases lately published and provided (Stat. 17 Edw. IV. c. 3). Therefore each 
of them in mercy iij''.' 

And that the inhabitants and parishioners of Buxhall, residing within the 
precincts of this Leet are guilty of offences for not providing and having a 
sufficient snare called " A Rooke Nett " contrary to the form of the Statute in 
such like case published and provided. Therefore they are in mercy iij''. And it 
is commanded to them to provide and have a sufficient snare according to the form 
of the Statute aforesaid before the feast of All Saints next ensuing under the 
penalty that they should forfeit to the lady x^ 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY I4, 32 ELIZ. 

And that every boy of the age of seven years and upwards and every man of 
the age of seventeen years and upwards dwelling vs^ithin the precincts of this Leet, 
is guilty of divers offences done contrary to the Statute published and provided for 
the use of bows and arrows, for that after the last Leet here held they have not 
used their bows and arrows according to the form of the said Statute, but have 
made default therein in contempt of the lady the Queen and contrary to the tenor 

' King Edward III., in the thirty-ninth year of his reign (1365), forbade the casting of the bar, 
the hand, and foot balls, cock-fighting, " et alios ludos vanos" but without effect, till they were some 
of them forbidden by Act of Parliament. By 17 Edward IV. cap. 3 (14.77), whosoever shall occupy 
a house or place of closh, kayles, half-bowl, hand-in, hand-out, or queck-board, shall be three 
years imprisoned and forfeit 20' ; and he that will use any of the said games shall be two 
years imprisoned and forfeit 10'. In 28 Henry VIII. (1536) proclamation was made against all 
unlawful games and commissions awarded into all the counties of England for the execution thereof; 
so that in all places, tables, dice, cards, and bowls were taken and burnt. By the 33 Henry VIII. 
(154.1), cap. 9, justices and ofHcers were empowered to enter houses suspected of unlawful games 
and to arrest and imprison the gamesters, &c., and by this Statute no artificer, apprentice, labourer, 
or servant shall play at tables, tennis, dice, cards, bowls, cloish, quoiting, and loggating out of 
Christmas time. Cloish or closh was, if not the same, exceedingly like kayles. It was played with 
pins thrown at with a bowl instead of a truncheon, and resembled the modern ninepins. Loggats 
was a game analogous to closh, but played chiefly by boys and rustics, who substituted bones for 
pins, and threw at them with another bone. Half-bowl was played with pins, and one-half of a 
sphere of wood, upon the floor of a room. The game was later known as rolly-polly. Hand-in and 
hand-out was a ring game, played by boys and girls, like kissing-ring. Queck-board was a game like 
shovel or shuffle board, queck being a push or blow. Even the licence at Christmas time was limited, 
play being only allowed in the " presence of their masters." 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 85 

of the Statute aforesaid. Therefore each of them forfeited to the lady the penalty 
in the said Statute contained. But the lady by her especial grace at the humble 
petition of the said Inhabitants as much as in her is, pardoned to them all the 
forfeitures abovesaid except vj^ viij'' from all of them, equally to be levied, which 
it is commanded to the Bailiff to levy of the said Inhabitants to the behoof the 
lady, &C.I 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 3I, 33 ELIZ. 

And that the Inhabitants within the parish of Buxhall aforesaid have not a 
certain snare called a "Crowe nett"- within the parish aforesaid to take crows doing 
damage there _ against the form of the Statute in such like case published and 
provided. Therefore they have forfeited to the lady the penalty in the said Statute 
contained. But by the grace of the lady and her court aforesaid their abovesaid 
forfeitures at this Leet are taxed at iij^ iiij'^ upon them. And the lady of this 
Manor of her especial grace at the humble petition of the said inhabitants as 
much as in her Is, pardoned to them the residue of their forfeitures now due, &c. 
Therefore It Is commanded to the Bailiff of this Manor to levy of the inhabitants 
aforesaid within the precincts of the Leet aforesaid for their offences aforesaid 
iij= iiij'. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 4 JAMES I. 

The Jurors say upon their oath that the tenant or farmer of a certain piece 
of land called Kinchans who as they believe ought to cleanse one pit belonging 
to the said piece of land lying In Buxhall next adjoining the highway and on the 
opposite side of the place called Woodstreet in Buxhall aforesaid, did not cleanse 
the pit aforesaid to the annoyance of divers tenants of this Manor and of others 
the subjects of the lord the King. Therefore the said tenant or farmer in mercy 
iilj'', It Is commanded to him to amend the pit aforesaid before the feast of the 

' Every one being a subject of the King under sixty years of age not lame nor having any 
hindrance ought to shoot in the long-bow, and to have one bow and arrows as followeth : Every 
manchild in the house from seven years old to seventeen ought to have one bow and two shafts. 
Every one from seventeen to forty, one bow and four arrows. No one under the age of twenty-four 
ought to shoot at pricks [wands or rods] nor at twelve score [yards] or under one shaft or flight. 
Forfeiture 6s. 8d. for every three months not having these bows and arrows. The forfeiture for such 
shooting at pricks is 4d. the shoot, and at twelve score and under as above 6s. 8d. the shoot, by the 
Statute 33 Henry VIII. cap. i. (Kitchin). 

= The fine was los. for not being provided with any crow-nets, forfeitable to the King and lord 
of the manor equally, 24 Henry VIII. c. 10, revived by 8 Eliz. cap. 15. 



86 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Nativity of our Lord next ensuing after the heading of this Court upon pain of 
forfeiture to the lord of the manor aforesaid los. 

The Jurors aforesaid sav also upon their oath that a certain Robert 
Lockewood who ought to cleanse as they think a certain pit belonging to the Manor 
of Kocksalles lying next on the opposite side of the place called Woodstreet, in 
Buxhall within the precints of this Leet, did not cleanse the pit aforesaid to the 
annoyance of divers the subjects of the lord the King. Therefore he is in mercy 
iiij**, it is commanded to him to cleanse the aforesaid pit before the feast of the 
Nativity of our Lord next ensuing after the heading of this Court, upon pain of 
forfeiture to the lord of this manor los. 

In a Court held Oct. 6, i Jac. I., there are some interesting findings 
as to breaches of provisions of Acts of Parliament. The Court fines one Joseph 
Wade for having " watered " hempe or flax In a place where " beaste doe use to 
drinke," and the constables, John Salter and Daniel Rychars, for breach of the 
provisions of the 13 Edw. L cap. i, namely, that "the watch ought to begin at 
the feast or the Ascension and ought to be houlden vntell the feast of Set. 
Michaell all the night from the settinge of the sunne vntell the rysinge ; " and one 
William Bell, for having put to pasture in a common place " a hors infested 
with glaunders." • 

The Manor of Buxhall was in early days of considerable extent and value. In 
the time of Henry VIII. there were about 80 free tenants and 30 copyholders. 
The free tenants held in Buxhall over 322 acres, and in Finborough 78 acres. 
They also held 38 separate tenements. Even as late as 1777, according to a 
survey made that year, there were copyhold tenants holding over 200 acres of 
the Manor, and a considerable number of free tenants owing fealty and suit of 
Court and paying a quit rent. Much of the copyhold since 1777 has been 
purchased by the lord and thus extinguished, but there are still nearly 100 acres 
held in various small tenancies as copyhold of the manor. 

The Court Rolls are intact from the reign of Henry VIII. to the present 
time, and Courts Baron have been held regularly down to the present day. The 
Court of the Manor, by custom, chose the Constables for the year, and it seems 
generally to have had an eye on parish matters. Thus, for instance, in 1558 it 
ordered that William Syer should procure for his windmill such honest men as 

' If any horse or mare be put on the waste and be scabbed or mangy, or have any infectious 
disease its owner forfeits to the lord of the Frank-pledge 10s. by 32 Henry VIII. c. 13. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 87 

should grind wheat or other grain of any of the neighbours, and besides make the 
" mele " lawfully without any fraud or deceit or any other diminution of the tolls, 
except under penalty of x' forfeited to the lord of the manor, to be levied on 
the goods and chattels to the use of the lord, &c. The Court imposed fines for 
neglect to repair the Customary, and the free tenements, for trespassing, for 
cutting timber, for obstructing of ways, and so forth. One or two extracts will 
demonstrate this more clearly : — 

SEPTEMBER 3O, I ELIZ. 

Robert Warren has not as yet repaired his Tenement as had in penalty at the 
last Court. Therefore that penalty is forfeited, and it is commanded to the afore- 
said Robert to repair the Tenement aforesaid in all things before the feast of Pente- 
cost next ensuing under penalty of v'- 

APRIL 14, 5 ELIZ. 

The homage say that Thomas Passefont Rector ot the parish Church of 
Buxhall is a common trespasser in the wood of the lord . in cutting divers " les 
bunches of broche woude " without leave. Therefore &c. [Fined vj''] And it 
is commanded to him henceforth not to do so upon pain of xij''- 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3O, 5 ELIZ. 

Whereas at the Court here held on xiiij day of April in the year abovesaid 
it being presented by the homage that Edward Bradstrete bond tenant of the lord 
was cutting vij oaks called " Pollynges " to the value of three shillings and 
sixpence growing upon the Close called Tyllys without the leave of the lord 
whereupon it was inrolJed by the steward that the aforesaid Edward should be in 
mercy. And that henceforth he should not do so. And whereas upon scrutiny of 
the ancient Court Rolls aforesaid, to wit : of the year xxj Edward the fourth, 
xxxvj Henry the Eighth and divers others, it is sufficiently certain to the Court 
that in the like case the lands in such manner wasted in those times for such 
waste ought to be seized into the hands of the lord as if forfeited. The Steward 
now at this Court, according to the form of the entries of the aforesaid Ancient Rolls 
and according to the custom of the manor aforesaid made order to the Collector 
to seize the close aforesaid for that cause into the hands of the lord. And to 
answer to the lord for the issues therein arising &c., whereupon came the aforesaid 
Edward Bradstrete in his own person before that the Collector had seized the Close 



88 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

aforesaid and acknowledged that he for the cause abovesaid had forfeited the Close 
aforesaid according to the custom of the manor and this rightly and justly &c. 
And he put himself upon the grace of the lord, where upon the lord at the special 
request of the steward and divers of his friends and for a certain competent fine to 
him by the aforesaid Edward paid, remitted and released the forfeiture of the 
Close aforesaid and re-granted the Close aforesaid to the aforesaid Edward, to hold 
to him and his heirs as in its original state, &c. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 4 JAC. I. 

In this full Court the lord of the manor of his especial grace pardoned John 
Pilbarowe for cutting before this Court " an oakinge Cobb " upon customary land 
which he holds by copy of Court Rolls of his manor to him and his heirs for ever 
in Buxhall aforesaid by the surrender of John Baker and also now he gave leave 
to the said John Pilbarowe to cut down upon the land aforesaid and from thence 
to carry away two other " oakeing cobbes " and one elm called "a right upe ell" 
to repair and mend one tenement in Buxhall aforesaid called Hatter which the 
aforesaid John Pilbarrowe likewise holds by copy of Court Rolls of the manor afore- 
said to him and his heirs by the surrender of the said John Baker which same 
licence the aforesaid John Pilbarowe asks to be enrolled in the Rolls of this 
Court, &c. 

FRIDAY, MAY I7, 9 JAMES I. 

The Jurors say upon their oath that Henry Kymball, customary tenant of this 
manor since the last Court for this manor " hath caused to be felled and cutt 
downe by his assignement " thirty-five trees called " cobbynges and stantyves " 
upon the demesne lands of the lord, growing in the hedge or fence which the said 
Henry by his tenure at his own costs and charges always and from time to time 
for ever ought to repair and keep in repair, being between the wood of the lord 
called Pyes Wood in Buxhall and the customary lands of the said Henry next 
adjoining the wood aforesaid as appears by the Rolls of Court Baron for this 
manor here held on the last day of the month of September being in the first 
year of the reign of the lady Elizabeth late Queen of England &c. The Jurors 
aforesaid present also that the said Henry Kymball lately cut down certain other 
trees called " right upes and stubbinges," and also the underwood growing in the 
wood aforesaid to the quantity of half an acre to the great prejudice and damage 
of the said lord of three pounds of lawful money of England, &c. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 89 

The Court on many occasions found that the bridges in the parish were out 
of repair and required the inhabitants to amend under a penalty. In the 24 Eliz. 
a certain Geoffrey Packard, farmer of Thomas Martyn, was fined for obstructing 
a way to Blackmans, part of the Buxhall estate. Packard had dug a ditch across 
the way and had cut and thrown down two trees to act as obstructions. The Court 
also dealt with cases of overcharging of the commons. Thus : — 

THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 35 ELIZ. 

They found that John Wade since the last Court here held unjustly over- 
charged the commons and waste lands of the lady of this manor called " the 
Grenewaye at Bradbrooke street " in putting and keeping more cattle upon them 
than by right he ought to the harm of others of the Inhabitants who ought to have 
common. Therefore he is in mercy iij'* and it is ordained by the homage aforesaid 
and also it is commanded to the said John that henceforth he do not offend in 
like sort under penalty that he shall lose and forfeit to the lady iij'' iiij'' 

There is a strange instance in the time of Elizabeth of a free tenant refusing 
to be sworn. The entry is rather interesting : — 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3O, 6 ELIZ. 

Whereas from the whole time of which the memory of men exists not to be 
contrary within the manor aforesaid such a custom was had that every free tenant 
of this manor ought to swear the oath of the same free tenant before the Steward 
of the Court of the manor aforesaid, that they would faithfully present in all 
articles touching the Court and if any free tenant should refuse to be sworn to 
enquire in form aforesaid, the Steward holding that Court according to his 
discretion ought and from the whole time aforesaid is accustomed to amerce that 
Tenant so refusing to be sworn according to the quantity of the default and he shall 
be able to assess the damage which by the estimation of the same Steward is due 
to the lord seised of the manor aforesaid for the contempt aforesaid. And now 
in this Court a certain Thomas Selowes alias Smythe, a free tenant of this manor, 
being in Court to enquire and present concerning articles touching the Court before 
the Steward of the Court, refused to be sworn in contempt of the Court and 
contrary to the custom aforesaid. Therefore the same Thomas Selowes alias 
Smythe is amerced by the Steward of the Court at xP &c. 

In the third year of Elizabeth this same Selowes, by the name of Smythe, was 

13 



go History of the Parish of Buxhall 

sworn bailiff. Two other cases of copyhold tenants refusing to be sworn occurred 
in a court held Wednesday, June i, 22 Eliz., 1580. The men were John Jower 
and William Syer, and each was fined in the more moderate sum of v^ 

The guardianship of an infant copyholder belongs in this manor to the lord, 
and he is entitled to appoint a guardian, and the wardship of the lord is on feudal 
principles "without account," i.e., he is entitled to retain for himself the surplus 
of the income after maintaining the infant.' Of course this wardship, like that 
in military tenure, only arises in respect of infants entitled by descent. But the 
copyholder cannot dispose by will of the guardianship of his infant heir to the 
detriment of the custom. 2 Probably in the present day this decision would be held 
to apply only to the copyhold tenement and not to the person of the heir. The 
person claiming to be guardian must be admitted on the rolls for the sake of filling 
the tenancy ; and if he will not apply for admittance the lord may appoint a guardian 
for the purpose. 3 

Wardship was at one time rather profitable, and the buying and selling of 
it not uncommon. Not far from Buxhall we have an illustration. By deed 
10 Hen. VIII., Sir William Waldegrave, Knt., sold to Margaret Drury, of Rougham, 
widow, the wardship of Edmund Wrest, to be married to Dorothy Drury, her 
daughter. And the same good lady by another deed bought of Robt. RadclifFe, 
Lord Fitzwalter and Egremont, the wardship of Elizabeth Day, a rich heiress, 
whom she married to her second son Francis. 

The same rule as to guardianship applied as well to the free tenants as to the 
copyholders, at least where they held by knight's service, as many of the free tenants 
of the Buxhall Manor did. Thus we find at a Court held Sept. 30, 1 1 Eliz., it 
was commanded to the bailiff that he " take into the hands of the lord one messuage 
and 6 acres of land late of James Carter held of the Manor by knight's service and 
jjs, yjd. j.g^^ yearly as appears in the year 35 Edw. III., and also take the body of 
the heir of the aforesaid James and answer to the lord for the issues." Again, in a 
later Court held Tuesday, Oct. 7, 14 Eliz., "it was commanded to the bailiff to 
seize into the hands of the lady not only the lands and tenements called Taylers and 
Wygmans held by knight's service of the manor during the minority of John 
Carter son and heir of James Carter deceased, who now is aged xij years, but also 
the body of the aforesaid John as ward of the lady, to whom his marriage belongs. 

' Anon. (1578) I Leon. 266. 

= Clench V. Cudmore (1691), Lutwyche, 1 181, and 3 Levinz 395. 

3 II Geo. IV. and i Will. IV. (1830) c. 65, ss. 3-5. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 91 

And that he do answer of the issues of the lands aforesaid to the lady until," &c. 
A similar proceeding took place in the case of Thomas Ryvett on the death of his 
father, Thomas Ryvett, who was lord of the Manor of Fennhall, and who held 
about 40 acres as free tenant of the Manor of Buxhall. 

(2) As to the Devolution of the Manor and its Lords. 

It is said that manors were not known to the Saxons — in fact Lord Coke has 
such a statement, but he adds : " Yet in efFect they had manors in those days in 
circumstance peradventure something varying in substance surely nothing differing 
from our manors at this day ; they wanted neither demesnes nor services, the two 
material causes of a manor as Fulbeck termeth them. Their demesne they termed 
Inlands, because the lords kept them in their own hands and enjoyed them in their 
own possession ; their services they termed Utlands, because those lands were in the 
manurance and occupation of certain tenants who in consideration of the profits 
arising out of these lands, were bound to perform unto their lords certain duties and 
services." 

The Manor of Buxhall in the time of Edward the Confessor, belonged to 
[1050.] Leswin Croc, 

who had also the advowson of the Church. Domesday Survey informs us that to 
the Manor, Norman son of Tancred added 3 freemen under the King's protection 
and soc with 24 acres. Leswin Croc had the soc and sac over the Hall and the 
bordars. But it is added the soc was in the hundred. A Hall, Aula, Halla or 
Haula, or chief mansion house, was the usual appendage of a manor. It did not 
necessarily include sac and soc, for a person might have his aulam without any 
jurisdiction. A certain number of freemen or socmen were necessary to every lord 
of a manor for holding the pleas of the Manor Court or soke. Saca was the 
power and privilege of the lord of a manor of holding pleas and of hearing and 
determining causes and disputes, levying fines and administering justice within a 
certain precinct. Soca was the territory or .precinct in which the Saca and other 
privilege were exercised.' Whatever the exact meaning of the individual words 

■ "Soca, soke," says Kelham, "generally signifies franchise, liberty, or jurisdiction; sometimes a 
territory or princinct ; sometimes a rent paid for using the land with some privilege or liberty or for 
the protection of the land." ("Domesday Book Illustrat., 330.") 



92 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

"sac and soc," together they mean the power of exercising private jurisdiction and 
the right to take and enjoy the profits thereof. 

Roger Pictaviensis. 

The first Norman lord of Buxhall was Roger of Poictou, third son of Roger 
de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury, by Mabel his wife, daughter and heiress of 
William Talvace, a person of great power and note in the time of Richard, Duke 
of Normandy, and brother to Robert, lord of Belesme, and Hugh de Montgomery, 
Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury. He was surnamed Pictaviensis, i.e., of Poictou, 
because of his marriage with Almodis, Countess of March, who possessed great estates 
in that province. He had nothing at all of his father's inheritance, but was a military 
man, and advanced by William the Conqueror to the dignity of an earl. He, as 
Dugdale says, " in wealth and power, having the Earldom of Lancaster, and all that 
part of Lancashire which lieth betwixt the Rivers of Ribble and Mersey and other 
great possessions in that and other counties of the Conqueror's gift, was not only 
a good friend to the Abbey of Shrewsbury, his father's foundation, by giving it the 
Churches of Kirkeham, Waleton, and Biscopeham and also the lordships of Pulton, 
Orciton and Biscopeham, with the fisheries of Thelewell (all in Lancashire)," but was 
liberal to various charities. He founded the Priory alien at Lancaster. Between 
the first division of property by William the First and the time of Domesday Survey 
however the possessions of Roger de Poictou were forfeited to the Crown in con- 
sequence of his defection from the royal cause, he having taken part in the rising 
in favour of Duke Robert of Normandy. Notwithstanding this he is found as the 
owner of the Manor of Buxhall in Domesday Survey, and if the restoration had not 
previously taken place, it is clear that on the accession of William Rufus his estates 
were restored to him. He supported William IL, but on his death took part 
with his own brother, Robert de Belesme, Earl of Shrewsbury, in his rebellion 
against Henry I. on behalf of Robert Duke of Normandy, and was again deprived 
of his possessions and banished the kingdom, his princely inheritance passing, in 
II02, to 

King Henry I., 
and from him, in 1135, to 

King Stephen. 

The manor probably remained in the Crown till Henry II. 's time, for though the 
Honor of Lancaster, of which it was part, was bestowed on Ranulf de Briscasard 
(styled also de Meschines), the third Earl of Chester, probably about 1141 (for 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 93 

the precise date is not known) ' the manor and demesne land did not pass 
with it. 

The difFerence between an honor and a manor must be borne in mind, the 
former is a combination of several of the latter. The difFerence consists principally 
in the much greater extent of the former and in the courts held in each. A manor, 
as we have seen, is composed of demesne and services to which belong a three 
weeks' court where the freeholders, being tenants of the manor, sit covered and give 
judgment in all suits that are there pleaded. But an honor has either a castle, 
as at Lancaster, or at least the site of a castle or some principal house of state, and 
consists of demesne and services to which a number of manors and lordships with all 
their appurtenances and other royalties are annexed. To every manor, as we have 
shown, a Court Baron is attached. In an honor an honourable court is kept once 
every year at least, and oftener if required, at which court all the freeholders of all 
the manors which are united to the honor make their appearance, and in which 
suitors do not sit, but stand bareheaded. In that court should be hung a cloth 
of state, and there should be a chair of state, upon which should be laid a cushion 
of cloth of gold, having embroidered thereon the arms belonging to the honor. 

The Honor of Lancaster did not remain long peacefully in the hands of 
the third Earl of Chester. He rebelled, and in the eleventh year of Stephen was 
taken prisoner at Northampton. In 1150, while assisting at the knighting of Henry, 
Duke of Normandy at Carlisle, by David, King of Scotland, he came to an agree- 
ment with that king that instead of Carlisle, which Ranulf claimed, he should have 
the Honor of Lancaster, and that his son should marry one of the daughters of 
Henry, son to the King of Scotland. This seems to have come to nothing, and 
subsequently the Earl arrived at an arrangement with King Stephen, who by charter 
granted to the Earl, amongst other possessions, " all the lands of Roger de Poictou 
from Northampton to Scotland, excepting that which belonged to Roger de Montebegou 
in Lincolnshire. Likewise all the lands between the rivers Ribble and Mersey." 
Henry the Second, when still Duke of Normandy only, had previously, by his charter 
sealed at Devizes, in Wiltshire, also granted and confirmed to the Earl all his posses- 
sions, and in particular " all the Honor (i.e., the Barony) of Earl Roger de Poictou 
wherever it lay," and also the whole Honour of Eye which Robert Malet, his 
mother's uncle, had. 2 The Earl was poisoned in 11 53 by William Peverel and 

■ Harl. MSB. 7386. 

^ This Charter is amongst the deeds of the Duchy of Lancaster in the Public Record Office 
[1135-1141]. 



94 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

others, and his son Hugh, surnamed Kevelive or Cyveline, joining with the King 
of Scots and the Earl of Leicester and others in the rebellion of 1173, was taken 
at Alnwick, and the forfeiture of his estate followed as the result. 

King Henry II., 

therefore, either at his accession, by reason of the Manor not having passed with the 
grant of the Honor of Lancaster to the Earl of Chester, or in 11 73 on the for- 
feiture by reason of its having passed, gained possession of it, had the Manor of 
Buxhall. It seems practically certain that the Manor did form part of the Honor 
of Lancaster. It is said in the Ipswich Great Domesday (book vi.) that the Honor 
of Lancaster held one knight's fee in Buxhall and two knights' fees in Finborough. 
In the Testa de Nevill the successor of Roger Pictavensis is also said to have held 
one knight's fee in Buxhall of the same honor, and in the Inquisition post mortem 
on Thomas as Earl of Lancaster, i Edw. III., this also is stated to be the case. 
Yet the Fine Rolls, 38 Hen. III., show that the Manor and demesne lands are 
held directly of the King, and fealty is ordered to be made ; and John Copinger, in 
1 512, resists a claim successfully of the Duchy of Lancaster. 

No record of the grant has been found, but it is clear that the Manor of 
Buxhall was granted by Henry II., about 1176, to 

Roger de Esturmy, 

of Stratton, co. Norfolk, probably a son of Richard Esturmy, 5 Stephen,' a son of 
the Esturmy, whose name appears on the Roll of Battle Abbey. 2 He was living 
I Richard, for in the Pipe Rolls of that year, in the returns for the Honor of 
Lancaster, we have the following : — 

. . . vie' deb', xx. s'. de Scutag'. Galweie. q' exigendi s't a Rog'o Esturmi. 

In the 33 Hen. II. the escuage from the Array of Galway came to be put in 
charge. It was xxs. per fee. 

The devolution of the Manor in the Esturmy family is thus traced in a MS. 
entitled, " Antiquitates SufFolciensis, or an FIssay towards recovering some Account of 
the Ancient Families in the County of Suffolk." 3 The Collection was mostly made 
by Sir Richard Gipps, Knt., of Great Whelnetham, Suffolk : — 

" Sturmy, anciently Esturmy. Sir Roger was lord of Buxhall in Stow 

■ Madox, "Hist, of Exch.," p. 101. = Andrew's "Hist, of Great Britain," i. 458. 

3 Brit. Mus. Add. MSS., 20695. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 95 

Hundred, 38 Hen. III. There were 5 Knts. successively in this family, Sir 
Wm., Sir Rob. his son, Sir Roger his son, Sir Wm. his son who lived 
2 Edw. II. and Sir Wm. his son who ab' 40 Edw. III. left Rhoisoia, his sole 
daughter and heir marry'd to William Clements of Stow, by whom he had issue 
Emma his sole daughter and heir, marry'd to John Cakestreet, who left Alice his 
sole daughter and heir marry'd to John Sorrell whose sole daughter and heir 
marry'd to John Copinger. They bore quarterly G. and or. upon a Bend, az (.? sa.) 
3 plates." 

The descent here given of the Esturmy family is no more correct than is the 
statement of the arms of the Copingers, but the start is good. No doubt Sir 
Richard had come across the Inquisition post mortem on Roger de Sturmy made 
38 Henry III. ; the proper devolution is as follows : — 

12 10 (14 John) Sir William Esturmy, son of Roger, High Sheriff of Norfolk 
and Suffolk in 1214, died c, 9 Henry III., 1225. 

[1225] Sir Robert Esturmy, his son and heir, d. 28 Henry III. (1244). 

1244 Sir Roger Esturmy, his son and heir, d. 38 Henry III. (1253). 

The Inquisition on his death is as follows : — 

Roger de Sturmy. Inquisition post mortem. 
38 Henry III., No. 23. 

E. diuina permissione Abb's de Persor' et J. Fresel dil'co s' d'no Will'o Russel 
coescaetor' suo in Com' Suff' sal'm Mandatu d'ni Reg' suscepimus in hec v'ba 
H. d'i gr'a t'c Abb'ti de person'e et Jacobo Fresel escaetoribus suis sal'm Mandamus 
vob' q'd per sac'mentu probor' et legal' hominu diligent' inquiratis q'ntu t're Rog's de 
Sturmy tenuit de nob' in capite in Com' Suff' et per quod s'uiciu et q'ntu de aliis 
et q'ntu t're ilia valeat per annu in oi'bz exitibz t're et quis propinquior h'es eius sit et 
cui' etatis et inquisicom f cam sub sigill' v'ris et sigill' eorum per quos Tea fu'it 
cosilio n'ro comoranti in Angl' s'n dilac'oe mittatis et hoc b're T'. A. regina nr'a 
et R Com' Cornub' f're n'ro ap'd Wind' v die marcii a r' n' xxxvlij. Et ideo vob' 
mandamus q'tm' perdc'm mandatu d'ni Reg' plene exeq'mini et inquic'om inde 
f'cum sub sigillo v'ro et sigill' eorum per quos f'ca fu'it sn' dil' nob' mittatis et 
hoc b're. 

Extent'o f c'a ap'd Buxhale man'iu quod fuit Rog' Le Esturmy per sac'ment' xij 
Lib'orum et leg' hominu per Will'm Russel excaetorem i' com' Suff' vigilia S'ei 
Gregorii anno r' r' H. fil' r' Joh' xxxviij. 



96 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Noi'a Jur' 

Gaufr' de Glanuil' Will's Seneloue 

Gaufr' Le Pere Walt' de Brdebroc 

Will's Cristemasse Lucas Le Due 

Will's die' de Cambes Will's Aldred 

Rob' de Glaunuiir Arnald' del Pertre 

Will's de Bruford Will's Copina 

Jur' dicut 

D' terra Arab'li iiij''" aer' et vj vn' q'libet ac' p'ciat' ad ijd'. 

Sum^ xiiij sol' iiijd'. 
D' pastur' iij sol'. D' Boxo ij sol' D' Cur' cu gardino ij sol'. 
D' Reddit' assio' per annu xxvij sol' x d'. 
D' operacoibz in antupno iiij"'' opera bn' q'libz opera p'ciat' ad jd'. 

Sum^ dimid' m'rc'. 
D' operacoibz per annu xx"" opera bn' iij opera ap'ciant' ad jd'. 

Sum' xj sol' jd' q'. 
D' gallin' x p'e' galiin' ob'. S^' vd'. 
D' ou v"" et valent iij ob'. 

Suma tocius iij Lib' vij sol' vd' ob' q^. 
Dicut et quod man'iu defendit' n' dn'm rege per seruic' unius militis et quod 
Rog' Sturmyn niehil tenuit de aliis in com' SufF' n' de d'no rege in eapite. 
Dicut et quod Will's Esturmin est fil' Rog'i esturmin et proxim' heres. D'etate 
dicut XXX annorum et plus. 

There is an order on the Fine Rolls, March 31, 1554 (38 Hen. III., mem. 9) 
to the Escheator of SufFolk upon William Esturmy, son and heir of Roger, 
making fealty to the King for all the lands which his father held of the King in 
chief to accept security of the said William for j^io in respect of relief, and to give 
full seisin without delay. 

1254. Sir William Esturmy, 

son and heir of Roger, b. 1224. He was custos and keeper of the City of 
Norwich 46 Henry III. Sir William, in 1267, together with William, son of Roger 
Sturmy, of Lang Stratton, levied a fine by which four virgates of land and the 
advowson of Buxhall, and many quit rents, &c., in Southborne, Butle, Bucksale, 
Orford, Wanesdene, Tunstall, Blakeshall, Helmele, Fynesbrigg, Lilleseye, Dunwich, 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 97 

and Cassenhall, were settled on William, son of Roger, the great-grandson of Sir 
William the High Sheriff. 

[1309] Roger Sturmy. 

[1327] Sir William Esturmy, 

son and heir of Roger, d. c. 40 Edw. III. 

[1366] Rhoisia Esturmy, 

daughter and heiress. She married William Clement, of Stow, Esquire, and left an 
only daughter, 

[1382] Emma Clement, 

who married John Cakestreet, and died, leaving an only daughter and heiress, 

[1397] Alice Cakestreet, 

who married John Sorrell, and died, leaving an only daughter and heiress, 

[1412] Anne Sorrell, 

who married John Copinger, of Buxhall, Esquire. The Copingers had long pre- 
viously flourished in Buxhall, and were so famous for wealth and hospitality that 
" to live like the Copingers " became a proverbial expression throughout the county 
of Suffolk.' The family was in immediate connection with a branch of the Copingers 
in the county of Cork, Ireland. In the time of John Copinger's father some of 
the family had passed into Ireland with Robert Cokerel, who on leaving Buxhall 
and settling in Ireland had granted his Buxhall property to another Robert Cokerel 
of Buxhall, who states the fact in a deed 17 Edw. III., still in existence (Ancient 
Deed Public Record Office, c. 3184), by which the grantee, Robert Cokerel, 
grants to his son Adam, and Cecily his wife, property both in Buxhall and 
Rattlesden. 

[1428] William Copinger her son and heir. 

William, by his Will in 1436, left the Manor and advowson of Buxhall to 
his brother John for life, with remainder to John's son, William Copinger, in fee. 

' See Coles's MSS., vol. 28, Brit. Mus. Davy MSS. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS., 191 24. Jermyn 
MSS., Add., 8206. McKeon's "Inquiry into the Charities of Lavenham," p. 95. It has been stated, 
but in error, that the Manor of Buxhall was dependent upon the Honor of Eye, and was granted 
therewith to Robert de UfFord, Earl of Suffolk, by Edward III. 



98 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

John Copinger, brother of William. 
He died in 1441, when the Manor passed under the Will of William Copinger, 
of 1436 to the nephew 

William Copinger, 

who dying about 1450, was succeeded by his brother, 

Walter Copinger, 

who died 15 12, and was succeeded by his son, 

John Copinger, 

against whom the claim of the Duchy of Lancaster, above referred to, was made. 
The only record is the answer of John Copinger to the claim which is extant 
amongst the Inquisitions post mortem of the Duchy, probably made in 15 12, and 
is as follows : — 

John Copynger, Duchy of Lancaster. 

Inquisitions "post mortem," Vol. ij.. No. 113, S.D. 

" SufF', This is thaunswere of John Copynger 

son and heire of Walter Copynger 
squier for dischargyng of Releve de- 
maunded of hym by Thomas Delahaye 
Feodarie of the Duchie of Lancastre 
in the Counties of Norff' and Suff' 
&c. for the manor of Buxhall in the 
said Countie of SufF'. 

113- 
The said John saith that the said Walter Copynger Squier fadre unto the same 
John longe tyme passyd infeofFed in the said manor John Clopton Esquie and 
diverse othre personnes to haue to theym and theire heires for euer by force wherof 
they were seased thereof in theire demean as of fee And so seased the said John 
Clopton survived all thodre the said feofFes And in the xvij"" yere of King Edward 
the iiij"' the same John Clopton soo being seased enfeoffed in the said manor of 
Buxhall Sir Thomas Bourchier Sir James Tirell knyghte and diuerse othr To haue to 
theym and to their heires for euer biforce Wherof the said Sir Thomas and James 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 99 

and other were therof seased in theire demean as of fee And so yet be seised of the 
the same manor And soo noo Releve ought to be due unto our sou'ain lord the 
king thereof And to all othre Rente and duetes that the said John Copynger ought 
to do for the same manor he is redy to doo as the Court wol award And prayth 
that he may have Writing to the said Feodarie for his discharge of any further 
trouble or vexac'on in that behalf." 

[Endorsed.] 

" Termino Hillarii anno X" H. vij"". 
H'upon it is ordred that the partie shall haue day unto the next terme at the 
comyng of the bailly by whom the matter may the better be herd understood and 
knowen and by the favoure of the Court the partie is admitted to apper by attorney 
Thomas Marowe And also a writyng to be made unto the feodarie to forbere of any 
forthe trouble in that mater unto his comyng." 

John Copinger died in 15 17, having had seven children, all apparently dying 
in his lifetime, as seems to be rather intimated by the inscription on his tomb. 
He was interred in the Church of Buxhall, and under his effigy in brass were those 
of his five sons and under the effigies of his two wives were those of his two 
daughters, all in brass, with the following inscription, as given by Weever, for the 
brasses themselves have all now disappeared : — 

John Copynger, Esquire, Lord and Patron. 
Anne and Jane, his wives, who had vii. 
children and dyceased an. M. D. XVII. 

Or, as given in the Jermyn MSS. in the British Museum, and communicated 
in 18 13 by the Hon. Miss C. Grimston : — 

" Prayc for the sowles of John Coppinger 
Poore Lord and Patron here 
I pray you all of charitie for my sowle say a Paternoster 
And ave, and for the sowles of Anne and Johane 
And for his chyldren seaven 
Jesu bringe our Sowles to Heaven." 

Walter Copinger, 

the brother of John Copinger, succeeded to the Lordship of the Manor of 
Buxhall on his brother's death in 15 17. It is strange that both his father and 



loo History of the Parish of Buxhall 

himself are in many of the MS. pedigrees called William. He married Beatrix 
Ashurst, of Gloucester, whose family arms were : Party per fesse az. and or. a 
pale counterchanged, three goats' heads, erased of the second. He died in 1532, 
and is buried in the Church at Buxhall, together with his wife, who died on the 
2nd of February, 15 12, with the following inscription: — 

"Walter Copynger, gent., which died the X. of Marche, an. M. D. XXXII., 
and Beatrix his wife, the second of February, M. D. XII." 

The following curious grant, given in the year 15 13, to this Walter Copinger 
by that ruthless monarch Henry VIII., who in this instance seems to have had a 
special regard to the head of his loving subject, is still extant in the Glebehouse at 
Buxhall :— 

" Henry R. Henry, by the grace of God, King of England and of France, 
and Lord of Ireland. 

" To all manor our subjects, as well of the spiritual preeminence and dignities, 
as of the temporal auctority, these our Letters hearing or seeing, and to every of 
them greeting. Whereas, we be credibly informed, that our trusty and well-beloved 
subject Walter Copinger is so diseased in his head that without his great danger he 
cannot be conveniently discovered of the same : In consideration whereof, we have 
by these presents, licensed him to use and wear his Bonet upon his said head, as 
well in our presence as elsewhere, at his liberty. Whereof we will and command 
you and every of you to permit and suffer him to do so, without any your 
challenge, disturbance, or interruption to the contrary, as ye and every of you 
tender our pleasure. Given under our signet, at our manor of Greenwych, the 24th 
day of October, in the fourth year of our reigne. Henry R." 

Granted anno 15 13. 

A similar grant to Humfrey Lloyd by Henry VIII., June 12, 19 Hen. VIII. 
(1527) will be found in the Had. MSS., No. 6986. 

John Copinger, 

the eldest son of Walter, succeeded to the family estates in 1532. In the Add. 
MSS., Brit. Mus., 16279, in the pedigree of Thomas Copinger, of Derrington, 
CO. Kent, this John is stated to have been Master of the Wardes, and in the 
Davy Collection for Suffolk a similar statement is made. In the Add. MSS., B. M., 
1 91 24 he is further stated to have been Lieutenant of the Tower, Master of the 
Mint, Groom of the Robes, and Senior Gentleman Usher to Henry VIII. 

It appears from Ruding's " Annals of the Coinage," vol. i. p. 74, that John 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords loi 

Copinger was a Warden of the Mint — " 4 Henry VIII. John Coppinger Custos 
Cambri et Monete et Cunagioruni auri et argenti." ^ Copinger resigned in favour 
of Pope. This is no doubt the same John Copinger who was Senior Proctor, 
151 7, 9 Henry VIII.2 

In the Cookham Court Rolls, co. Berks : " D'na Regina dedit xij fagos 
percipiendos in nemoribus vocatis Inwoods, in Dominus de Cokeham et Bray, 
Johanni Copynger garcioni Wardropiae. D'ni Regis, cujus datus est yj'" die 
Februarii a" R. H. viii. decimo quarto." 

" Ric'us Radyske est Woodwardus ibidem." 

And a warrant from Queen Catharine of Arragon, dated February 6, 1523, is 
annexed to these Court Rolls. It is the original document, but the seal of red 
wax is gone : — 

" By the ^lene." 

" We woll and c5maunde you, forthw' vpon the sight hereof, to delyuere, or 
do to be deliuered, vnto o" welbiloued John Copynger, Grome of my Lord's 
Roobes, or to his assignees. Twelve Beches for fuell, w' the loppes and toppes of 
the same, to bee taken of o' gift with'in o" woods called Inwoods in o' Lordship 
of. Cokeham and Bray, in the Countie of Berks: any restraint or c5maundement 
had or made to the contrary herof notwithstanding ; and these o' I'res shalbe your 
sufficient waraunt and discharge in this behalf. Geuen vnder o"^ signet at the 
Manor of Grenewiche the vjth day of P^ebruary the xiiij yere of my said Lord's 
Reigne [1523]. 

" To o" Baillif s Woodward, and kepers of o' woods called Inwoods in o"" 
Lordship of Cokeham and Bray and in thair absence to thayr deputyes there and 
to euerey of theym." 

John Copinger, by his will, dated May 7, 1539, gave his house at Buxhall 
to his son Henry. The gift is , peculiar, and is as follows : — " Item I giue vnto 
Henry my sonne my howse at Buxall with all such of houshold and other 
implements as yt standes and according as yt apperes be an inventory therof 
made betwen Richard Whelard and me being truyly there and whiche said 
Inventory dothe remayn in a lytle plated coffer in my ffather's chambr there 
amonge other wrytinge, the key whereof w' other keys of the house as my wyfe 
knowes where." 

' Warton's "Hist, of Lt. T. Pope," app. No. 3. ' Le Neve, 392. 



I02 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

His wife was Jane, only daughter and sole heiress of William Bond, of 
London, Clerk of the Green Cloth to Henry VII., by Anna Alphage, only 
daughter and heiress of John Alphage, alias Alphew de Boore, of the county of 
Kent, Esq., who died 4 Hen. VII., and Isabella, daughter and heiress of Rice 
Petit, Esq., and in consequence of this marriage the Copingers quartered the arms 
of Bond, Alphage, and Pettyt. By Letters Patent, March i, 30 Hen. VIII. 
(1539) the King, in consideration of the true and faithful services of John 
Copinger as one of the doorkeepers of his chamber, granted to him a capital 
messuage or tenement lying in the parishes of St. Margaret in Lotheburge and 
St. Olave in Hold Jurye and two other tenements next adjoining the east part of 
the said capital messuage, which were then used for a coalhouse or woodhouse, and 
were late in the tenure of John Parke, citizen and mercer of London, and 
formerly belonged to the monastery " Salutacionis Matris Dei " of the Order of 
the Carthusians next London ; also another tenement situate in the said parish of 
St. Margaret in Lothebury to wit, between the capital messuage late in the tenure 
of the said John Parke and then in the tenure of John Sadler, citizen and 
alderman of London, and lately belonging to the monastery of Holy Trinity, 
called Christchurch, now dissolved on the west part and abutting upon the tene- 
ment of John ClyfFord, citizen and mercer of London, then in the tenure of 
Robert Smythe, gent., towards the south, and upon the street there called Lothe- 
bury towards the north, to hold to the use of John Copynger and his heirs male.' 
All the above was found by an Inquisition post mortem taken at the Guildhall, 
February 27, 34 Hen. VIII. (1543) before John Cootes, Knt., Mayor and 
Escheator, John Copinger having died on the 26th of March, 31 Hen. VIII. 
[1540]. 

Henry Copinger, 

John Copinger's son and successor resided mostly at All Hallows, in Hoo, 
in the county of Kent, and he purchased of the heirs of Symons the Davington 
Court Estate, also in that county. 

In 1 56 1 his name appears amongst the freeholders of the county of Suffolk for 
Buxhall under this date in a manuscript in the Lansdowne Collection, and also in 
1569 and 1570, and in the first of these years he presented his son Ambrose to the 
living of Buxhall, and in the second of these years, on the resignation of x-\mbrose, he 

' The premises were held oK the King in chief hy the service of the twentieth part of a icnight's 
fee, and by the rent of 29s., and were worth per annum clear £\'i os. ^A. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 103 

presented George Dickenson to the living. He married, about 1543, Agnes, seventh 
daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn, Knt., of Rushbrooke, by Anne his wife, daughter 
of Thomas Sprynge, of Lavenham, co. Suffolk, Esq. Sir Thomas Jermyn w^as Sheriff 
of Norfolk and Suffolk 33 Hen. VIII., 1541, and died in 1552. In the Diary of 
Henry Machyn, Citizen of London, 1 550-1 563, edited by Mr. Gough Nichols for 
the Camden Society, is this entry : "The xxj day of October [1552] was the funeralle 
of a gentyl knyght. Sir Thomas Jarmyn, the best housekeeper in the contey of 
Suffolk, with ye standard and ye penone of armes, cot-armour, target, and sword, 
and skochyons ; and he kept a godly chapel of syngng men, for the contray have a 
gret loss of ye deth, as any contrey in England" (p. 27). By the settlement made 
on the marriage of Henry Copinger with Miss Agnes Jermyn the manor was 
settled upon Agnes for life by way of jointure, and after her death upon Henry 
Copinger and the heirs male of the body of the said Agnes, and in default of such 
issue on the said Henry in tail male as recorded in the Rolls of the Court of 
5 Edw. VI. He died at Allhallows, Sept. 13, 12 Eliz. (i^-jo),^ and was 
succeeded by his widow, 

Agnes Copinger, 

as Lady of the Manor of Buxhall. By an Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 
April 18, 13 Eliz. (1571), it was found that Henry Copinger was at his death 
seised of a capital messuage lying in the parishes of St. Margaret Lothbury 
and St. Olave in the Old Jewry within the City of London, and of two tene- 
ments next adjoining the east part of the said capital messuage, viz., at the south- 
east corner of the garden thereof, then in the tenure of Thomas Revett, Esquire, 
sometime parcel of the possessions of the Monastery of the Salutation of the 
Mother of God of the Order of the Carthusians, next London ; and also one 
tenement lying in the same parish of St. Margaret, then in the tenure of — 
Wolcadine in his demesne as of fee-tail, viz., to him and his heirs male, by virtue 
of a gift thereof made to John Copinger, father of the said Henry, and to his 
heirs male by King Henry VIII. as by his Letters Patent, dated at Westminster, 
March ist, in the 30th year of his reign (1539). The said premises were held 
of the Queen in chief by the service of the twentieth part of one knight's fee, and 
by the yearly rent of 29s., and were worth per annum clear £\2 os. 4d. 

Thomas Copinger was found to be his son and next heir, and was then aged 
24 years and more. 

' Chancery Inq. p. m., 13 Eliz., part I, No. iio. 



I04 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Agnes Copinger, the widow of Henry, died in 1600. Her will is dated 
February 7, 1599, and it was proved November 27, 1600. She was succeeded by 
her grandson, 

Sir Francis Copinger, 

son of her eldest son, Thomas Copinger, and Frances Brooke, daughter of William 
Lord Cobham by Dorothy, daughter of George Nevil, Lord Abergavenny. In the 
Harl. MSS., No. 98, is a copy of the articles of agreement made on this 
marriage : — 

"Articles of agreement made 6th, June 8 Elizabeth [1566] between Henry 
Nevylle, Lord Abergavenny, and Henry Copinger, of the parish of Allhallows, in 
the Hundred of Hooe, Co. Kent., Esq. That Tho. Copinger, son and heir 
apparent of said Henry, should marry Frans. Brook, eldest daughter of Right 
Hon. Sir William Brooke, Lord Cobham, and Lord Warden of the Sink Ports, 
said Lord Cobham to give 1,000 marks," &c. 

The Davington Court estate, as well as the other possessions of the family, seem 
to have been lost by the extravagance of this Thomas Copinger. The kw pathetic 
words in the Tanner MSS. are, " Francis " (he was the eldest son) " had many 
children, but his father had totally wasted the estate." The Davington Court 
estate was mortgaged by Thomas Copinger in the early part of King James's reign 
to one Freeman, and they both concurred in a subsequent sale of it to James Mills, 
of Norton, who went to reside at the Court. 

In the chancel, on the north wall of the Church of Allhallows, a monument 
formerly existed with effigies, arms, and inscription respecting this Thomas 
Copinger. In an old manuscript it is stated then to have been almost defaced.' 
From another manuscript - we find that the arms and inscriptions then remaining 
were : — 

"I. Four coats, quarterly: (i) Copi?7ge); three bendlets surmounted by a fesse 
charged with three Rundlets ; (2) Bond, arg. two bendlets sa. in chief, a cross 
crosslet of the second ; (3) Alfhage or Alphew, arg. a fesse between three boars' 
heads couped -sa. ; (4) Petit, arg. a chevron engrailled gu. between three bugle 
horns, sa. stringed or. 

" 2. Twelve coats, quarterly : (i) Brooke, gu. on a chevron arg. a lion 
rampant sa. ; crowned or. armed and tongued of the first ; (2) on a chevron three 

■ Harl. MSS., 6587. 

= Brit. Mus. Add. MSS., 191 24, p. 343. Thorpe's "Registorum RofFense," pp. 741-2. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 105 

lions rampant ; (3) seven mascles, 3, 3, i ; (4) two boars' heads nebule ; (5) a 
fesse between six crosses, flory ; (6) a chevron between three eagles' legs, erased ; 
(7) vaire, three bendlets ; (8) on a bend three goats passant ; (9) a chevron 
between three bulls' heads, caboshed ; (10) a fesse counter compony, between six 
crosses forme; (11) two bendlets; (12) a bendy of ten." 

" TJio. Coppingero de Buxall in provintia Sudovologarum orto, Cantii inhabitatori 
pacts administratori et vicecomiti aequo bonoque fautori, parenti benemerenti et filio 
primogenito Hen. Coppingeri Armigeri, et Agnet. filiie Tho. Germin equitis aurati 
Guilielmus Coppinger filius et heres ejusdem, Tho. C. Francisca unica sobole prenobil. 
Guilielmi Brook, baron Cobham et Dorot. filice Georgii Nevill domini Abergaven. 
hoc monumentum pietatis et memori^ ergo consecravit. Anno Domini, 1587." 

" Thomas Coppinger, ten., Man. de Buxhall cum suis pertin. et Ix. acr. terr. in 
Buxall et Rattlesden de Dno. R. et de Due. Lancastr. per serv. mil. per liber, ac. 
13 Eliz." ' (1571). 

He was appointed a commissioner by Queen Elizabeth to examine the state of 
Rochester Bridge,2 and was High Sheriff of the county of Kent in 1580. 

Francis Copinger (afterwards Sir Francis) held his first Court for the manor, 
Nov. 4, 43 Eliz. (1601), Agnes Copinger having held her last Court 
March 13, 42 Eliz. By deed dated January 16, 1602, Francis Copinger sold the 
manor of Buxhall and the advowson to his uncle, 

Henry Copinger, 

who was then Rector of Lavenham, the consideration being the payment by Henry 
of an annuity of ;^200 a year to Ambrose Copinger and Lettice his wife and the 
survivor providing Francis Copinger so long lived. This deed is recited in one 
amongst the Close Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. The parcels are 
"all those the manors of Buxhall als. Bucksale, Cocksall Old Rettons and Fase- 
bornes with all their and every of their ■ rights members and appurtenances 
wheresoever situate lyinge and beinge in the townes fields parishes and hamletts 
of Buxhall Rattlesden Finbarrowe magna Fynbarrows parva Hitcham and 
Brettenham or in all or any of them in the county of Suffolk," &c., together 
with the advowson and patronage of the parish church of Buxhall. The real nature 
of the transaction appears from a Court Roll of the manor of Cockerells Hall, 

• MS. of R. Sparrow, 181 3. Of course this is incorrect, as he was not entitled till the death of 
his mother Agnes, and she did not die till 1600. 

^ Index to Harris's "Hist, of Kent," Harl. MSS., 5517-9. 

15 



io6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Sept. 1 8, 43 Eliz., preserved amongst the additional charters in the British 
Museum. The transaction was in fact an exchange, Henry Copinger assuring to 
Francis Copinger all right and interest which he, Henry, had in the manors of 
Dawley and Hartington, in the parish of Hartington, in the county of Middlesex. 
The tenants of the manor of Buxhall all attorned to Henry Copinger by payment 
of a silver penny at his first Court, held March 29, i Jac. I. The manor was 
evidently settled, for at a Court held October 11, 14 Jac. I., 1616, it is 
expressly stated that at the time the manor was held by Henry Copinger for 
life with remainder to William Copinger, his son, in fee. This of course accounts 
for the fact of the manor not being referred to in Henry's will. 

The last-mentioned Henry was a man who made a mark in the county in his 
day. He was born in 1550, and received his academic education at St. John's 
College, Cambridge, of which society he was in 1577 elected Fellow.' By a mandate 
from Queen Elizabeth he was elected Master of Magdalen College, Cambridge, 
which, at her request, and to avoid a contest as to his title with the Earl of 
Suffolk or his guardians, he afterwards resigned, ^ but soon after this, viz., March 26, 
1578, he was presented by the Earl of Oxford, the then patron, to the rectory of 
Lavenham. Before his death he purchased of one Woden the next presentation. 
He was an intimate friend of that eminent scholar and renowned wit of the 
seventeenth century, the Rev. George Ruggle, A.M., and Fellow of Clare Hall, 
Cambridge, the ingenious writer of that celebrated dramatic satire, the comedy 
of " Ignoramus," and from him received the following legacy : — 

" Item, I give and bequeath to my worthy friend, Mr. Henry Copinger, the 
elder, of Lavenham, fifty shillings to make him a ring." 

Henry Copinger was, in 1591, promoted to a prebendary stall in the Cathedral 
Church of York, being collated on December 4th. 

Fuller, in his " Church History," gives the following interesting account of 
this spirited divine, whom he styles " a free Pastdr and faithful Incumbent 
well met." 

"1622, Dec. 21. — Henry Copinger, formerly Fellow of St. John's College, 
in Cambridge, Prebendary of Yorke, once Chaplain to Ambrose, Earl of Warwick 
(whose funeral sermon he preached), made Master of Magdalene College, in 
Cambridge, by her Majesty's mandate, though afterwards resigning his right at 
the Queen's (shall I call k?) request, to prevent trouble, ended his religious life. 

■ V. Peck's " Desid. Curiosa," vol. ii. pp. 40-42. 
^ Carter's "Hist, of Cambridge," p. 295. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 107 

The fact was he was so much discountenanced by the hereditary patron of the 
college that he was forced to quit his mastership, and by accepting that, having 
parted with his Fellowship, to which there was no return, he was practically turned 
out of all — as one chronicler adds, ' A very hard fate upon so deserving a man.' 
He was the sixth ' son of Henry Copinger, of Bucks Hall, in Suffolke, Esquire, by 
Agnes, daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn. His father on his death-bed, asking him 
what course of life he would embrace, he answered he intended to be a divine. ' I 
like it well,' said the old gentleman, ' otherwise what shall I say to Martin Luther 
when I shall see him in heaven, and he knows that God gave me eleven sons, and 
I made not one of them a minister .-* ' An expression proportionable enough to 
Luther's judgment, who maintained, some hours before his death, that the saints 
in heaven shall knowingly converse one with another. Laneham living fell void, 
which both deserved a good minister, being a rich parsonage, and needed so, it 
being more than suspicious that Dr. Reinolds, late incumbent, who ran away 
to Rome, had left some superstitious leaven behind him. The Earl of Oxford, 
being patron, presents Mr. Copinger to it, but adding withal that he would pay no 
tithes of his park, being almost half the land of the parish. Copinger desired 
to resign it again to his lordship rather than by such sinful gratitude to betray the 
rights of the Church. ' Well, if you be of that mind, then take the tithes,' saith 
the Earl, ' I scorn that my estate should swell with Church goods.' However, it 
afterwards cost Master Copinger sixteen hundred pounds in keeping his questioned 
and recovering his detained rights, in suit with the agent for the next (minor) Earl 
of Oxford and others, all which he left to his churches quiet possession, being 
zealous in God's cause, but remiss in his own. He lived forty and five years the 
painful parson of Laneham, in which market town there were about nine hundred 
communicants, amongst whom, all his time, no difference did arise which he did 
not compound. He had a bountiful hand and plentiful purse (his paternal 
inheritance, by death of elder brothers, and other transactions, descending upon 
him) bequeathing twenty pounds in money, and ten pounds per annum, to the 
poor of the parish ; in the chancel whereof he lyeth buried under a fair 
monument, dying on St. Thomas his day, in the threescore and twelfth year of 
his age." 

Henry Copinger died on December 21, 1622, and was interred in the Chancel 
of the Church of Lavenham, where, on the north side of the altar, a very handsome 
monument is erected to his memory, of marble and alabaster, gilt and painted. It 

' No, fourth Son. 



io8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

consists of an arched recess, between two Corinthian pillars, supporting a cornice 
surmounted with the arms of the family. In this recess are represented, in alto 
relievo, the reverend divine and his wife, facing each other, and kneeling before a 
table, the divine with a book in his hand, and the wife with her hands in the 
attitude of prayer. They are both habited in black, with white ruffs round their 
necks. Under the principal figures are three compartments. In the middle are seen 
their children habited in black, and kneeling before a covered table ; under the man 
seven sons, and just at the knees of the eldest an infant in swaddling bands ; and 
under the woman four daughters ; the two groups facing each other, a folding-stool 
being between them. The first of the sons is represented cross-gartered down the 
leg, in the fashion alluded to by Shakspeare in the fifth act of his " Twelfth Night." 
One of the boys has a skull in his hands, and the second girl another, to show that 
they were dead before the monument was erected. On either side of the monument, 
upon a pedestal, stands an angel at full length, the one on the dexter side with a 
cross in his right hand and a scroll in his left hand, on which is written, " dilicti 
accipite coronam vita; ; " and the other, on the sinister side, holding a trumpet in 
his left hand and a scroll in his right, bearing the inscription, " mortui venite 
ad judicium." Over one angel, on the cornice, " novissimus lectus sepulchrum " ; 
and over the other " viventes sequentur mortuos." 

On a tablet, on the left hand, is this inscription : — 

" Sacrum memorie Henrici Copingeri, antiquissima Copingerorum familia, in agro, 
hoc Suffolciensi, oriundi, Jiujus ecclesia per quadraginta et quinque annos pastoris ; paciftci, 
fidelissimi, et vigilantissimi. Monumentum hoc, amor is et pietatis ergo, dilectissima uxor, 
Anna, marito optime merenti, heu invita superstes, mcerens posuit. 

Amans maritus, prole fcscundus pater, 

Sancti pius pastor gregis, 
Q.ui sensa dextre codicis docuit sacri 

Nee voce quam vita magis. 
Qui largd abunde pavit indigos manu 

Securus annona domi. 
Hie plenus annis, plenior Deo, jacet, 

Secum polo gregem trahens 
Mutus jacet ; sed lingua qua vivo decus, 

Vitam paravit mortuo." 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 109 

On a tablet on the left side : — 

" This monument was erected at ye sole costs of Mrs. Ann Copinger, in memory 
of her deare husband, the Reverend, learned, and godly divine, Mr. Henry Copinger, 
fourth Sonne of Henry Copinger, of Buxhall, in this countie, esquire, by Agnes, his 
wife, daughter to Sir Thomas Jermine, of Rushbrooke Hall, knt., the paineful and 
vigillant Rector of this church By the space 0/45 yeares, Prebendarie of the Metro- 
politane church of St. Peter, in Torke, Lord of ye towne, and patron of ye church of 
Buxhall aforesaide, who marryed Ann, daughter to Henry Fisher, of Linne, in Norfolke, 
gent., and by her had eight sonnes and four daughters ; and, after he had lived Godly 
72 yeares, dyed peaceably ye list of Dec, Anno. 1622." 

Under the whole is this inscription in a circle : " Justorum Memoria 
benedicetur." 

On a tablet underneath : — 

^^ This monument of Dr. Henry Copinger was new beautified. Anno Domini 1721, 
by Mrs. Judith Brinkley, daughter of Thomas Burlz, gent., and Margaret, his wife, 
third daughter and co-heir of Ambrose Copinger, D.D., by Judith, his wife, 
only daughter of Roger Keddington, gent. ; which Ambrose was second son of the said 
Henry, and also Rector of this parish, and of Buxhall, where he was buried, 
A" D' 16." 

On a shield under the niche, between and just above the man and woman, 
are these arms : — 

Copinger, Bendy of 6 or. and gu. on a fesse, az. 3 plates. Impaling : Fisher, 
Arg. on a chevron between three demi-lions rampant gu., as many plates. 

On a large shield at the top of the monument are these escutcheons, viz : — 

(1) and (6) Copinger ; (2) Jermyn, Quarterly Or. and Gules ; on a bend sable, 
three escallops Argent ; (3) Bond, Argent, two bends sable, in sinister chief a cross 
crosslet of the last ; (4) Alphage, Argent, a fesse between three boars' heads couped, 
fesse ways, sable ; (5) Petytt, Argent, a chevron engrailed between three bugle-horns 
sable, stringed Gules. 

Crest : a ram's head sa. On the dexter side on a small shield, Copinger ; on 
the sinister side, Copinger impaling Jermyn. 



no History of the Parish of Buxhall 

By his Will in 162 1 he gave to William Copinger, his eldest son (if he had 
not previously conveyed it), the perpetual patronage of the parsonage of " Church 
in Buxall," with all other copy and free lands which he had in "Buxall, Great 
Finbarrow, little Finbarrow or Rattlesden." And after giving various legacies, he 
says : " And for the Poor whom I should have first remembered. Imprimis, I give 
to be distributed within one week of my death ^4, and in the month of February 
next following other eight pounds, and in the second February after my death other 
£S, and further to four of the most aged, needy, and impotent persons in Lavenham, 
which shall be after the death of Ambrose, my son, and Judith, his now wife, I give 
all the benefit and profit which shall arise of the tenement and yard which now 
James Write dwelleth in and useth, and all the free meadow called the Church 
Meadow, and the three roods more or less of copie lying in that meadow, if the 
Lord of that Manor will consent thereunto, to the use of four such parties as before 
be named successively for ever, which four persons purposed to receive that benefit 
are to be nominated by my sons William, Henry, Raphe, Francis, and Thomas, the 
parson of the Town then being, the Headboroughs of that Town, or the greater 
number of them, and if all my sons be dead, or being requested to join in choice 
of any of these refuse, then my mind is that the Parson and Headborough, if the 
Parson be resident, otherwise the greater part of the headboroughs without the 
Parson, to make choice of such as shall receive that helpe, and if the Lord of the 
Manor will not permit the copy piece therein to be applied to that good use, then 
I give that copy piece, after Ambrose and his now wife's death, to Thomas, my 
youngest son, and his heirs. The intent of me is that the Headboroughs of 
Laneham have the estate of the land to the only user before said." 

Ambrose having died in or about November, 1644, and Judith, his wife, on 
the 3rd of November, 1675, the charity was, soon after the demise of the latter, 
applied in accordance with the Will of the testator. The charity constituted by this 
Will is still in being. 

The following account of the first appointment of persons to partake of the 
charity is extracted from the " Account Book " : — 

" Of all the five sonnes which the donor, by his will, did appoint to joyne 
with the parson and headboroughs of the Towne, in the choice of the four poore 
persons, there was none that was alive at the death of Mrs. Judith Copinger, 
save only Mr. Henry, who being requested to joyne in the said choice, did 
refuse, and made his owne request to the other electors that he himself might be 
chosen for one of the foure to partake of the benefitt ; to whom, being very aged 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 1 1 1 

and low in estate, his said request was readily granted. And the other three that 
were chosen in to make up the number, were old John Lambert, the husbandman ; 
the Widow Wright, relict of the same James Wright which dwelt in the tenement 
when the will was made ; and the Widow Deersly, relict of old John Deersly." 

The following extract from " Lavenham Church," a poem from " the pen of a 
Child of Nature," thus characterises the Rev. Henry Copinger : — 

" The great good Copinger, whose godly ways 
'Twere well to imitate in modern days. 
Maintain d a character which grac d our land. 
And for its meed a laurel might demand. 
Oxford's unlawful offers he refused, 
Forbad the sacred rites to be abus'd. 
Oh ! let not sacrilege our conscience stain. 
Wrong not the sacred place for earthly gain ; 
Success itself will prove the cause of pain." 

William Copinger, 

the next Lord of the Manor of Buxhall, was born in this parish in November, 
1582. Upon the marriage of his son Henry with Mary, the daughter of Henry 
Herris, of Shenfield in Essex, and of Mary his wife, the daughter of Sir Harbottle 
Grimston, Bart., and Elizabeth his wife, the daughter of Ralph Copinger, of Stoke 
in Hoo, Kent, William Copinger executed a settlement dated Oct. 7, 22 Car. I. 
(1647). The father of the lady paid as a marriage portion ^2,000, of which, 
in consideration of the Settlement, William Copinger took ^^ 1,900 and Henry the 
son took ;^ioo. The Settlement was of the " Manours of Buxhall alias Buckes- 
hall Cokesall alias Cockesalls ould Nortons and ffasebownes together with the 
perpetual advowson and right of Patronage of the Church of Buxhall." It also 
included Buxhall Hall farm, containing 64 acres, then or then late in the occupation 
of Edward Eweysam (Eversam),' Faseborne Hall, a tenement called Cogman's 
farme and containing 42 acres in the occupation of William Copinger, 2 lands in the 
occupation of William Bennet 3 containing 64 acres, lands containing also 64 acres 

' In the deed of 1668, " late of Edward Ewarsam the elder, now of Edward Ewarsam the younger." 
= In the deed of 1 668 stated to have been late in the occupation of William Copinger, now of 

Henry Copinger. 

3 In the deed of 1668 stated to be late in the occupation of William Bennett, then of Thomas 

Chaplayne. 



112 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

then or late in the occupation of John Grimwood '■ of Buxhall, a messuage and farm 
called Cogsett garden then or late in the occupation of Thomas Everson- contain- 
ing 1 08 acres, a messuage and farm called Hardhead containing 92 acres then or 
then late in the occupation of Henry Reynolds, 2 a messuage and farm called Smith's 
then or late in the occupation of Hugh Badcock3 containing 55 acres; lands con- 
taining 40 acres then or then late in the occupation of William Wade; 3 a messuage 
and farm called Powell's containing 74 acres, part in the occupation of Thomas 
Pilborowe and the residue in that of Francis Copinger ; a messuage or tenement in 
the occupation of Robert Davy; a piece of land called "Buxhall Tye," containing i 
acre ;4 one Windmill and two tenements adjoining;? one Wood called the five acres 
containing 13 acres; 6 one piece of ground called the "Patronage peece " containing 
two rodes ; 7 the lands called Miilfields containing 26 acres then or late in the 
occupation of William Carpenter;' the messuage called Tysetill and the lands there- 
with containing 6 acres then or late in the occupation of Coe ; 8 the Wood 

called Pyes Wood containing 19 acres ; ' a piece of land called Little Gardiners 
containing 5 acres in the occupation of Robert Marsum ; 9 so much of the lands in 
the occupation of John Grimwood the Elder of Rattlesden as were freehold and 
contained 46 acres lying in Rattlesden and Buxhall and all other the manors and 
estates of William Copinger being freehold in the towns fields and parishes of 
Buxhall, Rattlesden, Great Finborough, Little Finborough, Hitcham, and Brettenham 
by the names and contents of the Manors of Buxhall als Buckeshall Cocksall als 
Cocksalls ould Nortons and Fasebornes. 

The lands in the occupation of Bennet, Grimwood, Everson, Reynolds, and 
William Copinger were settled after the marriage on Mary Herries for life, then on 
Henry Copinger for life, with remainder to heirs male with remainder to William 
Copinger, second son of William Copinger the settlor in tail male with remainder to 
William the father in fee. The lands in the occupation of Wade, Pilborowe, 
Francis Copinger, Davy, Buxhall Tye, Buxhall Hall, two cottages and the five acres 

' In the deed ot 1668, "now in the occupation of Thomas Greenwood." 
= In the deed of 1668, "now of Henry Copinger and one Robert Wade." 
3 In the deed of 1668, "now in the occupation of Henry Copinger." 
•» In the deed of 1668, "now in the occupation of Richard Scott." 

5 In the deed of 1668, "the Windmill and one of the said 2 tenements in the occupation 01 
John Clover and the other tenement in the occupation of Elias Scofeild." 

6 In the deed of 1668 stated to be in occupation of Henry Copinger. 

7 In the deed of 1668 in occupation of Thomas Pilborough. 

8 In the deed of 1668 Tyekill "late in occupation of John Coe now of John Shepherd." 

9 In the deed of 1668, "late in occupation of Robert Martyn then of William Copinger clerk." 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 113 

were settled on William the father and his wife Mary for their lives, then on 
Henry for life, then in tail male and in default on Henry in fee. The Patronage 
piece, the manors, the advowson, the Millfields, and the tenement Tylehill were 
settled on William the father and his wife Mary for their lives, then on Henry in 
tail male with remainder to William Copinger the second son in fee. Pyes Wood, 
Lock Meadow, Sleyders, and Little Gardners were settled on William and his wife 
Mary for their lives, with remainder to Henry in fee. 

William Copinger died in 1648, and was interred in the Chancel of Buxhall 
Church, where on a flat stone is this inscription to his memory in small capitals : — 

Here lyeth the body of William 

Copinger Esq^, expecting the 

Joyful resurrection, who 

Marryed Mary ye daughter of 

Richard Goodday of Kettlebar- 

ston, Esq., by whom he had 

issue 2 sonnes and 6 daughters ; 

And after he had live peace- 
ably, charitably, and piously, 

departed this life comfortably, 

The 13th of January, 1648, in the 

67 th yeare of his age 

Maria illius relicta charissimo 

conjugi, pietatis ergo, moerens posuit. 

Arms above — (i) Dexter side, Copinger; (2) Sinister side, Copinger impal- 
ing Goodday, a fesse wavy between two leopards' heads in pale. 

Mary Copinger, 
William's widow, succeeded to the Manor and Lordship of Buxhall, and 
continued lady of the Manor from 1648 to 1663, when she died, and was interred 
in the same vault with her husband, the following inscription being placed on a flat 
stone to her memory ; — 

Here lieth the body of 
Mrs. Mary Copinger, the rel- 
lict of William Copinger, 
Esq., who died the 4th 
day of March 
1663. 

16 



1 14 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Henry Copinger 
succeeded to the property, and in November, 1668, by Fine and Recovery barred 
the estates tail under his marriage Settlement of 1647. 

By deed of Nov. i, 20 Car. II. (1668) he declared the uses of the Fine 
and Recovery to be to the use of himself for life, then to the use of Mary his wife 
for her jointure, and then to his heirs male by his wife Mary with remainder to 
himself in fee. The property comprised in this deed was that in the Settlement of 
1647, under practically the same description, with the addition of what Henry 
Copinger was seised in fee, but omitting the farms Powells 74 acres and the 46 
acres in the occupation of John Grimwood of Rattlesden. The addition was a 
messuage and farm called Howletts containing 17 acres, sometime Robert Rednall's, 
formerly in the occupation of one William Utteridge, but then of Henry Copinger, 
and by him purchased of Thomasyn Copinger, spinster, by deed Oct. i, 14 
Car. I. 

Henry Copinger died on the 4th of December, 1675, and was buried in the 
Chancel of the Church of Buxhall, where on a black marble slab is the inscription 
to his memory in capitals : — 

(Arms : Copinger impaling Herris, on a bend wavy three estoilettes.) 

" Henrici Copinger Arm" 

hie habes totum q"" coelum n'habet 

Qui uxorem duxit Mariam, filiam H" Herris 

de Villa Shenfield in agro Essexiensi, Arm" 

ex qua sustulit quinquies quaterq. puerpera ; 

superstites filium filiasq. tres. 

Hos omnes, licet charissimos, lubens reliquit 

X* die IV. An° Dni. MDCLXXV° 

Properavit scil' quo sanctius celebraret 

Maximum cum superis natale. 

^tat'^ an° LIV" 

Hoc monumentum dicta Maria 

pietatis ergo posuit." 

The following are extracts from the Will of Henry Copinger, 1675 : — 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 115 

" I, Henry Copinger of Buxhall, in the County of Suffolk Esq. though at 
this present sicke in body yett praised be to God of good and perfect memory, 
revoking all former wills doe make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament 
in manner and forme following. As for my body I committ to the earth from 
whence it came and desire to have it interred amongst my ancestors in the parish 
church of Buxhall aforesaid with decency and privacy." He then gives a sum of 
^500 to his daughter Elizabeth charged on lands in Buxhall in the occupation of 
Thomas Pilborowe, and provides that if default should be made in payment to 
Elizabeth she might enter into the farm then in the occupation of Thomas Pilborowe 
and take the rents and profits and if the said sum of ^^500 should not be paid 
within three years after testator's decease he gave and bequeathed the same farm to 
Elizabeth his daughter in fee.' 

Testator then gave another legacy of ^Tfoo to his daughter Mary charged in 
similar terms upon his farm called Buxhall Hall, then in the occupation of Edward 
Eversom and Thomas Kite, and the hoiise and Windmill in the occupation of Charles 
Pollard. He also gave to Mary for her maintenance until she attained 19 an 
annuity of ^^20 out of the same property, to be paid to her at his mansion house 
called Fasborne in Buxhall. He' likewise gave a legacy of /I500 to his daughter 
Anne to be paid to her at 19 and charged the same on the farm late in the 
occupation of William Wade, and the messuage and farm called [Howletts 2] and 
containing about 17 acres, late in his own occupation, and the little house in the 
occupation of Chas. Scofeild, the lands called Millfeild containing about 26 acres in 
the occupation of Edw. Everson, and the messuage and farm called Tile Kilne 
containing 6 acres. And after various other bequests he continues, " Item, I give 
and bequeath vnto William Copinger my nephew, the sonne of William Copinger 
Clerk, my brother, the next avoydance, donacon, and right of presentation of and in 
the Rectory and Parish Church of Buxhall aforesaid, together with all the tythes, 
obvencon, oblacons and other duties and profitts thereunto incident yf the said 
William my nephew shall fortune to survive the said William his father the present 
incumbent there. ... I give and bequeath vnto my worthy and loveing friend Sir 
George Wenieve Bart., and my loveing brother William Copinger Clerke and to 
the executors and administrators of the survivor of them all that my manor of 

■ Elizabeth by Deed Poll, Aug. 31, 1679, appointed John Kcbic, of Stowmarkct, her attorney to 
take possession of Pilborowe's farm on the ground that the ^^500 had not been paid to her within the 
three years. 

^ There is a blank in the original Will which is in the writer's possession. 



1 1 6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Buxhall with the rights members and appurtenances the demesne land now in my 
owne hands parcell of and belonging to the said mannor excepted, and all those my 
wood grounds called Pyeswood,' and other my wood grounds in Buxhall aforesaid 
to hold to them the said Sir George Wenieve, and William Copinger, my brother, 
and the executors and administrators of the survivor of them for the terme of fForty 
yeares next after my decease vpon trust and confidence that out of the rents and 
profitts of the said Manor except before excepted and the said Wood grounds they 
the said Sir George Wenieve and William Copinger my brother and the executors 
and administrators of the survivor of them shall raise all and every the legacies 
aforesaid which by the sayd Will of my said Deceased Uncle Thomas Copinger 
would have become payable by the said fFrancis Copinger his executors and 
administrators had he lived and taken vpon him the trust thereof, Together with 
interest after the rate of flFoure pounds, p.c.p.an. from the said feast day of 
St. Michaell Th'archangell last past for the same and shall satisfy and pay the same 
to the respective persons to whom the same in the said Will are appointed to be 
payd. And vpon further trust and confidence that they the said Sir George 
Wenieve and William Copinger my brother, and the executors and administrators of 
the survivor of them shall pay all the overplus of the said Rents and profitts by 
them to be received as aforsaid to Henry Copinger my sonne his heirs and assignes 
their owne damages charges and expences in the execution of the said trust being 
deducted out thereof. Provided notwithstanding that yf the said Henry Copinger 
my Sonne his heirs and assignes shall well and truly satisfy and pay all and every 
the said legacies soe as aforesaid out of the rents and profitts of the said Mannor 
(except before excepted) and wood grounds appointed to be payd and such interest 
thereof as aforesaid according to the true meaneing of this my will that then and 
from thenceforth the said term of fforty yeares of and in the said Mannor (except 
before excepted) and wood grounds as aforesaid devised to the said Sir George 
Wenieve and William Copinger and the survivor of them and the executors and 
administrators of the survivor of them shall cease and determine. And then my 
will and meaneing is that all the rents and profitts that out of the said Mannor and 
wood grounds shall be received by the said Sir George Wenieve and William 
Copinger or either of them or the executors or assignes of either of them shall be 
payd to the said Henry Copinger my sonne his heires and assignes their owne 
charges damages and expenses in the execution of the said trust being first deducted. 

' Now called Pyc Hatch. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 117 

Item, I give and bequeath unto Thomas Copinger sonne of the said William my 
brother the sume of twenty shillings to be payd within one month next after my 
decease. Item, I appoint ffive pounds to be payd within three months after my 
decease to the Churchwardens and Overseers of the poore of Buxhall aforesaid to be 
by them distributed indifferent amongst the poore of the same towne." 

1675 Mary Copinger, widow of Henry Copinger. 

1686 Henry Copinger the son. 

He was educated at Bury St. Edmunds, and on the 7th of July, 1670, was 
admitted at Caius College, Cambridge, and on the i+th of December, 1675, ten 
days after his father's death, was admitted a Fellow Commoner of St. John's 
College, being then 21 years of age. His tutor was a Mr. Burton. 

In March, 1680, he barred the entail created by his father's settlement of 
1668, and limited the Buxhall property to himself in fee. The next year by deed 
7th June, 168 1, in consideration of ^^2,000, he sold the whole of the property 
comprised in the settlement of 1668 to his mother Mary, who under the settle- 
ment had a life interest. In 1686 he married Sarah Goodday, the only daughter 
and heiress of George Goodday; and by a settlement May 25, 1689, in which 
his mother joined, settled the Manor of Buxhall and the family property upon 
trust to pay an annuity of j/^80 a year to Mary Copinger his mother for life, 
and after a limitation of a term of eighty years for the benefit of incumbrancers, 
a limitation to himself for life, and to trustees for 500 years limited the fee 
to himself 

Henry Copinger seems to have lived beyond his means, and there were 
numerous incumbrances existing at the time of the settlement. No doubt the 
fear of creditors was at the root of the sale to his mother. The incumbrances 
both prior and subsequent to the settlement caused trouble later, and the resources 
of his wealthy father-in-law, a member of the Stationers' Company, had to be 
tapped. Old George Goodday seems to have helped in a liberal manner, but 
was evidently a man with a keen eye to business. His method of assistance was 
by taking transfers of the several mortgages as the incumbrancers required their 
money. Matters went pretty smoothly on this basis until the death of Henry 
Copinger and his mother Mary, the former of which occurred in July, 1691, 
and the latter in the following month of October. Henry left his widow 



ii8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

surviving and one daughter only, Sarah Copinger, an infant of three years. 
Shortly after Henry Copinger's death Goodday seems to have entered into 
possession of the Buxhall property, and in fact received the rents down to the time 
of his own death, which occurred in October, 1699. One incumbrance existing 
on the Fasborne Hall estate, Goodday does not seem to have secured, or at 
least, not the first charge, for this property was entered upon by Sir Edward 
Ward, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, as mortgagee, and passed out of the family. 
It is true Goodday had entered into possession of Fasborne Hall about Lady Day, 
1 69 1, and held till March 2nd following ; but he was then turned out by the prior 
mortgagee. Some information respecting these mortgages is derivable from the 
replies to certain interrogatories administered to William Copinger in an action 
Copinger v. Goodday. He states that he had heard at the time of his marriage 
Henry Copinger was indebted to several persons, and in particular to Sir Edward 
Ward, Lord Chief. Baron of the Exchequer, Richard Phillips, Esq., Robert 
Reynolds, Esq., George Goodday deceased, and to one Mr. Dawtrey ; that a farm 
called Fasbornes Hall and the farm called Cocksetts Garden was mortgaged to the 
said Lord Chief Baron, and that the Manor of Buxhall and the wood called Pye 
Wood was mortgaged to the said Richard Phillips, and also that a farm in the 
occupation of Thomas Grimwood, and certain lands lying in Buxhall, were in 
mortgage to the said Robert Reynolds. 

Upon George Goodday's death his son George being under age, letters of 
administration with the Will annexed to George Goodday's estate were granted to 
John Orlebar during the son's minority. Later George administered and continued 
in the receipt of the rents and profits of the estate and refused to render an 
account to the Copingers. There were further complications by reason of the 
deeds of Mr. Goodday the father having been destroyed by a fire, which occurred 
in Mr. Orlebar's chambers in the Middle Temple, April 7, 1704, difSculties 
arising between the parties as to what the securities destroyed were and what 
they included. 

Old Mr. George Goodday's difficulties about knowing what was comprised in his 
securities indeed arose before and independently of the fire, and his fear that the 
Lord Chief Baron should obtain more than he was strictly entitled to is quaintly 
set forth in a letter to his cousin Mr. Copinger the Rector. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 119 

To the Rev. Mr. Copinger, Rector of Buxhall, near Stowmark', SufF"". 

LoND. ye ()th Aprill, 1692. 

Cousin Copinger, 

I am satisfied you did take some paines to send me the last particular 
of Petits farme, but upon comparinge it vv"" a letter I had from my cousin Gregory 
in January last I find soe greate a difference in the quantity of several! of the 
closes and in the totall you make short of his ace" that I could not think of a 
better way than to employ Mr. Waller to get me a new ace" but not to let it be 
knowne it is for me w'"' I desire you will in like manner conceale. I had lately a 
letter from Mr. Cocksedge that mentions an order Mr. Tho. ffolker have given to 
take care of Mr. Ward's concerns and by agreement we made the last Decree my 
cousin the widow was to deliver Mr. Ward possession he givinge leave that she 
may have the yeares rent due at Lady last since her husband's death. To wch 
purpose I waite for a letter or noate that Mr. ff"olker will either put into Mr. 
Cocksedge hands or send to me and I am very desirous to be further satisfied 
how many acres of land is now in Petit's hands. Mr. Wards mortgage mentioninge 
140 acres but does not particularize the severall closes and theire abuttals. If John 
Petit hath not more in the totall than in your noate or that we can find out 
where the land is to make up just 140 acres we shal not need to make up the 
ffences to Hoggs meadow and the other small piece but if there will be enough 
without them they must be fenced out before Mr. Ward enters if they be in 
Petit's occupacon. What"* in Badcock's demise Mr. Ward hath no claime to. 
I suppose the six acre close pasture . . . the close my cousin Ann claimes were 
always reckoned part of the 42 acres ... in my cousin's hands and called the 
home fedinge. We must be carefuU not to give Mr. Ward the possession of more 
than he hath a title to. I doe desire when Mr. Waller comes to you to discourse 
about Petit's farme that you will give him the best assistance you can and hasten 
him to let me heare from him. Pray let me know whether you have meet with 
any of the old writings in the chest that can helpe us to ascertaine the copyhold 
land belonginge to Leff"ey mannor now in mortgage to Mr. NicoU's nieces in 
Ipswich. I must request of you to send me the fullest and most exact acctt 
you can of the land late in Winters occupacon. Pray take Mrs. Boggas or some 
other of your neighbours that can give you the best information and write doune 
the names and contents of each close and as farre as you can which is , . . to be 
the copyhold part. By my cousin Copinger's admission there should be 42 acres 
copy. If any of the fteilds have 2 names write both that I may the better 



I20 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

examine them with the courte copy, perhaps the old name may be most 
needful for me to know. Pray take the ist opportunity you can to give me an 
acctt of the empty farnie. Wishinge my cousin your wife a good hower, I am 

y affect"' cousen 

Geo. Goodday. 

Later he writes as to a Court to be held for the Manor. 

London, Oct. ii, 1692. 
Cousin Copinger, 

My silence had not been thus longe if my other businesse had not soe 
crouded in as that I was not soe well master of my time to inspect your acctt in 
order to make a settlem' with you. I intend it shal not be longe before you 
heare againe from me. My cousin Jeeling have this day brought me ffive and 
twenty shillings to be returned from Mrs. Levins to her kinswoman Mary 
Copinger at Buxhall desiringe it may be forthwith payd her and her acquittance for 
it sent me up to deliver to him. You may write it on the top of the halfe 
sheete that y"^ letter is writt upon ; if it be a loose paper it will pay double 
postage. I have by this post sent Mr. Waller orders to call a court at Buxhall 
which must be kept in the names of my cousin Heate and Mr. Wallinger another 
of my neighbours who are my trustees in the assignment of Mr. Phillips 
mortgage. I thinke the most proper place will be at the little house between the 
Church and good M'. Dasseys, where if I mistake not good M"". Davy dwells. 
If the custome was to make any entertainement for the Tenants they must be 
contented at present with a glasse or two of the best beer and a pipe of 
Tobacco. I will order Mr. Waller to carry the Tobacco with him, and pray 
speake to my cousin Browne to let there be as many bottles of my cousin's best 
beer as shal be thought needfuU to be used at the court. My cousin Gregory did 
sometime since desire to have notice when there was to be a court : if you know 
how to send to him when Mr. Waller hath settled the time pray let him know it. 
I have advised Mr. Waller of him that if he can meet with any conveyance for a 
letter he will write him word. I remember it is in the Layer that the bushes are 
soe groune as must to need stubbing. When it is the season I will appoint Mr. 
Cocksedge to agree for havinge them stubbed. Pray give my respects to my 
cousens at Buxhall resting 

Y"^ Affect, cousen 

Geo. Goodday. 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 121 

But to return. The result of not being able to obtain an account from Good- 
day was that Henry Copinger's widow Sarah and his only daughter Sarah filed a 
Bill in Chancery against him, and on a hearing before the Lord Keeper of the 
Great Seal, February 22, 1706, it was decreed that an account should be taken 
by the Master of Goodday's charges. The Master reported, June 28, 1708, that 
there was only due to Goodday in priority to the settlement, or at least to Sarah 
Copinger's jointure and her daughter's portion, /I657 7s. iid. 

Goodday's account is interesting. It is made up to 1 704 and is as follows : — 

Account of all the mortgages and judgments with how much interest there is 
due upon each of them as also of other necessary disbursements which were owing 
to and p'' by Geo. Goodday Esq' deceased and stand now charged as a debt from 
the heires of Henry Copinger Esq'' upon their estates in Buxall and Hadleigh 
Suffolk. 

Imprimis. £ s. d. 

A mortgage from Capt Reynolds bearing date the 22 of June 

1691 for 834 7 '6 

Interest due for the same till the 22nd of Sept. 1704 being 13 

years and a quarter ... ... ... ... ... ... 55210 6 

A mortgage from Richard Phillips Esq'*^ bearing date the nth 

and 12 of May 1692 for ... ... ... ... ... 655 00 00 

Interest for the same to the 12th Nov. 1704 being 12 years 

and a halfe ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 409 07 6 

A mortgage from Bright of Ipswich bearing date March 28 

1691 for 140 17 4 

Interest due for the same till the 28 of Sept. 1704 is 13 years 

and a halfe ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 94 16 9 

A mortgage from Edmond Coleman Esq'" and his daughter 

Mary bearing date Octob. 9th, 1 691 for ... ... .. 105 00 00 

Interest due for the same till the 9 of Octo. 1704 being 13 

years ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 68 5 00 

A judgment from Mrs. Nichols bearing date the 13 of April 

1 69 1 for ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 100 00 00 

Interest due for the same till the 16 of Octo. 1704 being 13 

years and a halfe ... ... ... ... ... ... 67 10 00 

17 



122 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

£ s. d. 

A mortgage and judgment from Jn. Wright bearing date the 

17 of December 1690 for ... ... ... ... ... 91 09 00 

Interest due for the same till the 17 of December 1704 is 14 

years ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 63 14 00 

A mortgage from the BJomfeilds bearing date the 17 and 18 of 

April 1 69 1 for ... ... ... ... ... ... 90 08 00 

Interest due for the same till the 1 8 of Octob. 1 704 is 1 3 

years and a halfe ... ... ... ... ... ... 60 15 00 

A mortgage from Ruth Hamon bearing date the 9 of October 

1691 for ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 73 10 00 

Interest due for the same till the 9 of October 1704 being 13 

years ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 47 15 06 

A mortgage from Brand bearing date the 24 of April 1691 63 00 00 

for Interest due for the same till the 24 of Octob. 1704 

being 13 years and a halfe ... ... ... ... ... 42 10 06 

A judgment from Robt Ross bearing the date the 25 of 

February 1690 for ... ... ... ... ... ... 23 10 00 

Interest due for the same till the 25 of Novemb. 1704 being 

13 years and 3 quarters ... ... ... ... ... 23 o 7J 



^3617 07 21 

The Disbursmts are as follows : — 

Paid by Geo. Goodday Esq'' deceased upon Ruth Hamon's sur- 
rendering lands at Hadleigh to him ... ... ... 16 00 6 

P'' Mr. Butler for carrying on a Suite in the Exchequer ... 37 8 3 

P'' Mr. Wright on the same account ... ... ... ... 20 4 i 

P'' Mr. Waller on the same account ... ... ... ... 39 00 00 

P'' more to Mr. Waller for defending and prosecuting an extent 
and other suits in the Excheq. for Indemnifying Capt. 
Copingers Estate agst a bond of ^19,000 given to the late 
King and Queen on acctt of Mr. Love Receiver Generall 69 10 00 

Due in all ... ... ^^3799 10 ooj 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 123 

An account of Receipts with the papers is as follows : — 

An acctt of how much money has been reed, on the Estates of Henrv 
Copinger Esq"^ deceased in Buxall and Hadleigh Suffk. 

Reed, by Samuell Waller for Quitt rent... 

Reed, by Samuell Waller as Steward 

Reed, by Tho. Cocksedge as Steward for the year 1694 

Reed. do. for the year 1695 

Reed. do. for the year 1696 

Reed. do. for the year 1697 

Reed. do. for the year 1698 

Reed. do. for the year 1699 

Reed. do. for the year 1700 

Reed. do. for the year 1701 

Reed. do. for the year 1702 ... ... ... • 

Reed. do. for the year 1703 

Reed, by W"' Copinger for 9 years rent at Mickiiias 1699 at 
^15 yearly comes to £133 out of wch allowed him for 
taxes he also paying for the woods ^45 and by repairs 
Churchwardens and Overseers rates he having pd. them for 
the woods being in our possession 16 10 o which with 
the taxes make ^61 10 o and so remain ... ... ... 73 10 00 

Reed, by Mr. Boughton as Steward for Hadleigh estate being 

ever since it was in our possession ... ... ... ... 142 05 02 

Reed, more by Geo. Goodday Esq"" decesd. ... ... ... 1051310 

Reed. do. for fines at a Court in 1692 ... ... ... ... 16 15 00 

Reed. do. for fines at a Court in 1696 ... ... ... ... 40 00 00 



£ 


s. 


d. 


34 


3 


II 


[17 


1 1 


7 


63 


12 


7 


13 


II 


9 


44 


10 


9 


14 


2 


10 


:29 


I 


I 


66 





"^ 


99 


13 


4 


37 


I 


9i 


91 


6 


10 


53 


2 


6 



III all ... ... ;ri442 04 II 



There is also a years rent due from all the tenants at Mickmas 
last besides old arrears. The Quitt rents of the Manor 
are much in arrears and there will be severall fines due 
when a Court is called. 

The money found to be owing to Goodday was paid by Sarah Copinger the 
Elder, and the re-conveyance, July 5, 1708, made to trustees, Messrs. Capper, 



124 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Bright, and Fletcher, in trust for Sarah Copinger the Elder until she should be paid 
her jointure and the sum of ^^657 7s. iid. with interest, and then in trust for 
Sarah Copinger the Younger until she should be paid her portion, which under the 
settlement was ^2,500 and interest, and then in trust for George Goodday subject 
to redemption in favour of Sarah Copinger the Younger on payment to Goodday of 
the sums charged by Henry Copinger subsequently to the settlement. The 
properties comprised in this deed of arrangement were Greenwood's 64 acres, Hard- 
head's 92 acres, closes of land 18 acres formerly belonging to Cogsett's Garden, 
Smith's 37 acres, the Manors of Buxhall alias Buckesall, Cokesall alias Cokeshall, 
and Old Nortons, the Woods called Pyes Wood 19 acres, the Wood 5 acres 
containing 14 acres and the pasture called Patronage piece " planted with fruite 
trees." 

The parties seem to have had a pleasure in specifying property which could 
not possibly pass under the Deed. The Manor of Cokersall, or Cockerells, was 
then in the Vesey family, where it had been for 150 years prior to this date, and 
before it came into the Copinger family in the person of Gregory Copinger. 

As the annual value of the property, re-conveyed by Goodday, was but 
^119 9s. 4d., and Henry Copinger, who had died in 1691, had covenanted that 
his wife's jointure should be ^^327, there appeared to be little chance of the 
daughter Sarah receiving her portion of ^2,500, and no probability whatever of 
Goodday ever seeing any of his father's advances beyond what had under 
the arrangement been already paid. For the conduct of the suit, and to 
enable her to pay off Goodday's charge, Sarah Copinger, the mother, had 
borrowed of her sister-in-law, Mary Copinger, ^^850. In order to secure this 
sum and to make some provision for her daughter, she joined with Mary Copinger 
in executing a deed, dated September 11, 1708, which, after showing that Sarah 
Copinger, the mother, was much reduced in circumstances by the heavy incum- 
brances on the property at the death of her husband, and that there was no 
provision for her daughter Sarah, the necessity for action against Goodday, and 
that Mary Copinger had found the money to prosecute the suit, and that there 
was then due to her ^901. "All those the Manors or reputed Manors of Buxhall 
alias Buckshall, Cokesall alias Cockshalls " with the appurtenances. And also certain 
other lands and hereditaments in Buxhall And the perpetual Advouson and Right of 
Patronage of the Church of Buxhall were granted to Richard Capper and Jeremiah 
Bright, as to certain hereditaments in Buxhall in the occupation of Benedictus Sparrow 
and Thomas Grimwood to the use of Sarah Copinger the elder for life with remainder 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 125 

to Sarah Copinger the younger in tail general with ultimate remainder to Sarah 
Copinger the elder in fee. And as to the Manors of Buclcshall Cockeshall alias 
Cokeshall To the use of Mary Copinger for two thousand years for securing the 
;^90i owing to her, with remainder to Sarah Copinger in fee. By Articles of 
Agreement made 20 Dec, 1709, in contemplation of the marriage of Sarah 
Copinger the younger with Dr. Thomas Hill it was agreed that the manors and 
hereditaments should be settled and the said Thos. Hill agreed that he would pay 
to the said Mary Copinger the sum of ;^90i or else would on his wife attaining 
twenty-one convey the manors and estates to the said Mary Copinger in fee. By a 
deed Dec. 22, 17 10, certain lands in the occupation of Robert Waller and also the 
Advowson were granted to Francis Hutchinson and Francis Page as to the lands (but 
not the advowson) To the use of Thos. Hill for life with remainder to Sarah his 
wife, with remainder to their issue in tail, with power to Thos. Hill and his wife 
to revoke the uses and declare others. And as to the advowson To the use of 
Thomas Hill and Sarah his wife and the survivor in fee. And by the same 
deed all the lands in the occupation of Benedictus Sparrow and Thomas 
Grimwood were granted to F. Hutchinson and F. Page To the use of Sarah 
Copinger the Elder for life with remainder to the use of Thomas Hill for life 
with remainder to Sarah Hill for life with remainder to their issue in tail. And 
after reciting that Sarah Hill had attained twenty-one and that Thomas Hill had 
agreed to convey his and his wife's interest in the Manor and estates mortgaged 
to Mary Copinger (except the Advowson) to the said Mary Copinger according to 
the Articles of Agreement, the parties conveyed " all those the Manors or reputed 
Manors of Buxhall alias Buckshall, Cookesall alias Cockshalls," with the appur- 
tenances and certain lands therein mentioned, including " that Wood or Woody 
ground called Pyeswood containing 19 acres and Wood called five acres Wood con- 
taining 14 acres and all other the hereditaments situate in Buxhall (except a farm in 
the occupation of the sd. Sarah Copinger, which had come to her under the Will 
of George Gooday i) to the use of Mary Copinger in fee." The deed recites that a 
fine was duly levied, and a release is given by Mary Copinger to Thomas Hill of 
the covenant to pay the ^901. 
Thus the Manor passed to 

Mary Copinger, 

and she retained the same for ten or eleven years. On the 20th of June, 1719, she 
made her Will, whereby she gave the profits of Buxhall Hall Farm to Sarah 

' This was Chaplyn's farm. 



126 History of the Parish of Buxht 



Hill for life, with remainder to Thos. Hill, eldest son of Dr. Thos Hill and Sarah 
his wife, and she devised " the Woods in Buxhall called five acres and Pyhatch 
Wood and also the Manor of Buxhall with all quit rents fines heriots Rolls 
writings and all the appurtenances thereto belonging " unto Thomas Hill, eldest 
son of Dr. Thomas Hill and Sarah his wife, in fee. Mary Copinger was buried 
at Buxhall May 19, 1720, being succeeded in the lordship of Buxhall by 

Thomas Hill. 

He, by his Will, dated the 5th of July, 1746, in which he is described as of 
Stowmarket, devised to his wife Lydia Hill " all that his Manor of Buxhall with 
the Rights, members and appurtenances in the County of Suffolk and also the 
advowson of the Rectory of Buxhall aforesaid and also those his Meadows called 
Drivers Leys then in the possession of Thomas Poole also all his close of arable 
land called Little Gardners and a piece of ground late a Hopyard and also all those 
his Woodlands containing about 30 acres all which premises were situate in the 
parish of Buxhall aforesaid. And also all his copyhold land held of the Manor of 
in the County of Cambridge To hold to her his said wife for life and 
after her death to his daughter Lydia in fee." Thomas Hill, the testator, died 
September 5, 1746, and his widow, 

Lydia Hill, 

died 4 May, 1748, at the early age of twenty-three, leaving an only child, 

Lydia Hill the younger, 

who died the 8th of May, 1759, aged 13 years, and was succeeded by the 

Rev. Henry Hill 

brother of Thomas, and then Rector of Buxhall. He married Susan Hulton. 

By his Will dated September 12, 1775, Henry Hill devised "All and every 
his manors Adowsons messuages lands tenements and hereditaments to his wife 
Susan for life," and after her decease to his son Henry Hill in fee, he paying after 
the death of his mother ;^ 1,000 to his sister Mary Hill. 

Susan Hill 

accordingly became lady of the Manor, but in 1776, by an Indenture of the 29th 
of September, conveyed the same to her son, 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 127 

Henry Hill, 

free from her life interest but subject to an annuity of /^2oo reserved to herself 
for life, and by an Indenture dated August 24, 1781, released certain parts of the 
estate from her annuity in order to allow her son to effect a proper settlement 
upon his marriage. The settlement was made on the 27th of August, 1781, of two 
farms let at ^^93 i8s. od. and '^94 5s. od., and was upon the settlor for life, 
then upon Elizabeth Tweed, his intended wife, for life with remainder to issue, 
and in default to the settlor in fee. Susan, the widow of the first Henry Hill, 
died September 8, 1794. 

By his Will dated July 28, 1826, Henry Hill the second devised "All 
that his Manor of Buxhall and also that undivided moiety or half part and all 
other his parts or shares of and in all that messuage or tenement and farm with 
the lands and hereditaments thereunto belonging situate lying and being in Buxhall 
or in some adjoining Parish or Place in the occupation of William Spinks And 
also all that messuage or tenement with the land and hereditaments situate and 
being in Buxhall containing by estimation 10 acres which he had then lately 
purchased of Thomas Stearn And also all those pieces of land lying in Buxhall 
called Hamblins, Farrow Field, and Church Meadow or by whatever other name 
or names the same were called then in his own occupation And also all those 
messuages or tenements cottages blacksmith shop yards gardens hereditaments 
and premises situate lying and being in Buxhall aforesaid and then or then late in 
the several tenures or occupations of James Purr Blacksmith, Mary Spurgeon, 
Thomas Davey, Samuel Harvey, William Buxton, Edward Thurlow, Richard 
Sparrow, James Allen, William Harvey, Samuel Eavis, and William Spink some or 
one of them And also the Woods called the World's End and Pye Hatch And 
the messuage or tenement and farm in the occupation of WiUiam Kimball And all 
other the messuages or tenements farms lands hereditaments and real estate " unto 
Elizabeth, his wife, for life, and after her decease unto Christopher Hand Bennett 
and Arthur Hanbury for the term of twenty-one years from testator's death in case 
his nephew, Copinger Gooch, should so long continue and be a fellow of Corpus 
Christi College upon the trusts therein mentioned. And on the decease of 
testator's wife and the end or sooner determination of the term of twenty-one 
years, he gave and devised his said real estates unto his nephew Copinger Gooch 
in fee. 



128 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Elizabeth Hill 
died March 3, 1831, when 

The Rev. Copinger Hill, 
who had assumed the name of Hill in place of Gooch, succeeded to the lordship 
and Manor of Buxhall and the family estates. He died in 1870, when he was 
succeeded by his eldest son 

The Rev. Henry Hill, 

late Rector of the Parish. The whole of the Buxhall property including the 
Manor (but excepting a certain small farm called Stone Farm, and the advowson 
which had been previously sold) passed in 1899 into the possession of 

Walter Arthur Copinger, 

who thereupon became the 45th lord of this Manor. 

In the Court Rolls are two lists of Tenements within the Leet of the Town 
of Buxhall, one 5 and 6 Philip and Mary, and the other 2 Elizabeth. The first is 
as follows : The tenement Fasbornes. The Mershe, Daniel Richer's tenement, 
Oates Coote, Swetmans tenement, Wardes tenement, Taylors Pyes and Wigmans, 
Farthings and Cleves, Rames and Hawes, Elis tenement, Taylors tenement, Bertes 
tenement, Readers tenement, Edward Salters tenement, Darwises tenement, Hiccins 
and Hilles, Robert Osbornes tenemente, Langmers Agglettes and Footes, Cogmans 
tenement, Childes tenement, Henry Richers tenement, Pyes tenement at Pyes woode, 
Kysses tenement, Agnes Salters tenement, Robert Crosse for Scotes and Kebes, John 
Crosse for Barbours, Winters tenement, Thomas Smyth for Costardes, the tenement 
at the Mille, John Salter for Risbies, Revelles tenemente, Revelles tenement at Brad- 
broke strete, Kenetts tenement, the tenement at Buxhall woode, Pilbarowes tenement, 
Andrew Salters tenement, Caprons tenement, Lambes tenement, Wyllyam Syers 
tenement, Roger Salters tenement. Gages tenement, Gorelles tenement, Cosons tene- 
ment, the terme of the Manor of Buxhall, Tilles tenement in Bretramstrete. 

The list as given 2 Elizabeth is fuller and varies somewhat : — Tenement and 
land late Fasbornes now in hands of lord. Tenement and lands late Taylors namely 
Pyes and Wymans at the High Strete now in the tenure of William Githerytche (.?), 
Tenement and land called Fotes and Ketes, now in holding of James Crosse, Tene- 
ment and land late Ellysses, now in holding of Johanna EUysse wid.. Tenement and 
land late Kysses now in hands of lord. Tenement and land late Dorioythes now in 



The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 129 

holding of John Salter, jun., Tenement and land late Brownes now in holding 
of Dorothy Childe, Tenement and land late Revells in Bradbroke Street now in 
holding of Robert More, Tenement and land late Taylours in Bretenhand Street now 
in the holding of Thomas Taylor, Tenement and land late Berts formerly Leches now 
in holding of William Berte, Tenement and land late Reders now in holding of 
John Salter, sen., Tenement and land late Salters in the Church Street, Tenement 
and land late High'ms and Hills now in holding of George Salter, Tenement and 
land late Woddes being tenement called Langmere Fotes Agglettes and Barants 
now in the holding of John Wodde, Tenement and land late Barbors now John Jacob, 
Tenement and land late Barkers now John Bridgge, Tenement and land late Gonnalls 
now in holding of William Vesey, Tenement and land late Gage now in the holding 
of Henry Rycher, Tenement and land late Kate Skotes now William Collen, Tenement 
and land late Manb, now Robert Martyns, Tenement and land late Rysbies, 
" apud monte " now Elizabeth Salter wid., Roger Salter for Tenement " sone apud 
hymde hill," Tenement and land late Costards in the hlghe strete. Tenement and 
land late Pilbarowes now Margaret Pilbarowe, Tenement and land late Andrew 
Saters Tenement and land late Caporus, now William Caporus, Tenement and land 
late Lames now Agnes Lames, wid., John Salter for land called Swetemans, Tene- 
ment and land late Wards ante Ryches, Tenement and land late Wyndysshe formerly 
Revetts, Tenement and land late Cossyns, Tenement and land late Hawes now John 
Brastret, Roger Bradstret, John Marten and Joan his wife and Anne Brastrete single 
woman, Tenement and land Tylles now Edward Brastrete, Tenement and land at the 
Mill late Seyrs, Tenement and land late Wynters now John Salter, Tenement and 
land late Kenytts now John Salters, son of John Salter, sen.. Tenement and land late 
Fryers now Henry Rychers, Tenement and land formerly Gawge now of the said Henry 
Richers, Tenement and land late Farthings and Cleves now Richard Richers, Tene- 
ment and land late Deenes Woode and William Seyr, Tenement and land late of 
Borares Wodde now John Osbornes, Tenement and land late Coggemans Tenement 
and land late Pyes at Pyes Hatch Wodde, Tenement and land at Spitlands called 
Buxhall Wodde (held by Martin Rycher). 

Most of the above can be identified, but some of the tenements have passed away 
entirely — for instance, Cogman's tenement, formerly in Cogman's Lane. Costardes 
have certainly been pulled down. Oates Coote, or Kate Skotes, is now known as Cates 
Coates, and is still copyhold of the Manor, being held by Mr. Richer, of Rattlesden ; 
Taylors Pyes and Wigmans or Pyes and Wignians, now form part of the Lodge 
farm. Farthings and Cleves was late the Parish Room. Elis Tenement, or " tene- 



I30 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



ment and land Ellysses, now in holding of Johanna Ellysse late widow" of 2 Eliz. is 
now known as Rudlands, and lies between the Valley and Coles Farms. Bertes tene- 
ment, formerly Leches, is still copyhold of the manor and held by Mr. Gudgeon, 
late of Stowmarket. Hiccins and Hilles in 2 Eliz. in holding of George Salter, is 
the messuage lying next to "Rivetts" in Buxhall. Langmers Agglettes and Footes 
is still copyhold of the Manor, and held by Mr. Hammond, of Colchester. Childe's 
tenement was subsequently known as Browns, and occupied the site of the two 
cottages now standing opposite the Valley Farm. Henry Richers tenement, or 
Friars, occupied the site of the two cottages now standing next to the late Parish Room. 
Pye's tenement, at Pye's Woode, was copyhold of the Manor of Buxhall till recently — 
in fact, till 1899, when it was enfranchised. Barbours is still copyhold and held 
by Mr. Gudgeon, of Stowmarket, with Berts. Risbies or Rysbies, held by John 
Salter, 5 and 6 Phil, and Mary, and by Elizabeth Salter wid., 2 Eliz., is what is now 
known as Purple Hill Farm. Revelles tenement or Barkers is the present Post 
Office of Buxhall. Kenett's tenement occupied the site of the cottages now stand- 
ing opposite to the Maypole Farm. " Gonnalls," in holding of William Vessey, 
was later known as " Gunnells," and is now known as the HoUybush. Pilbarowes 
is now known as Coles Farm, and Wyndysshe, formerly Revetts, as the Cottage. 



The F 


ALLOWING IS A Summary List of the 
Buxhall. 


Lords of the Manor 


OF 


[1050] 


Leswin Croc. 


[1397] 


Alice Cakestreet 




[1067] 


Roger Pictaviensis. 


[1412] 


John Copinger 




1 102 


King Henry L 


[1428] 


William Copinger 




1135 


King Stephen. 


[1436] 


John Copinger 




1154 


King Henry II. 


1441 


William Copinger 




[1176] 


Roger de Esturmy. 


[1450] 


Walter Copinger. 




1210 


Sir William Esturmy. 


1512 


John Copinger. 




[1215] 


Sir Robert Esturmy. 


1517 


Walter Copinger. 




1244 


Sir Roger Esturmy. 


1532 


John Copinger 




1254 


Sir William Esturmy. 


1539 


Henry Copinger 




1300 


Roger Sturmy 


1543 


Agnes Copinger 




[1327] 


Sir William Sturmy 


1600 


Francis Copinger 




[1367] 


Rhosia Esturmy 


1603 


Henry Copinger 




[1382] 


Emma Clements 


1622 


William Copinger. 





The Manor of Buxhall and its Lords 



13 



648 


Mary Copinger. 


1746 


Lydia Hill. 


663 


Henry Copinger. 


1748 


Lydia Hill the Younger 


675 


Mary Copinger the Younger 


1759 


Rev. Henry Hill. 


686 


Henry Copinger. 


1775 


Susan Hill 


692 


John Heath and Anthony Wal- 


1776 


Henry Hill, the son. 




linger, as mortgagees. 


1826 


Elizabeth Hill. 


708 


Sarah Copinger. 


1831 


Rev. Copinger Hill. 


710 


Mary Copinger. 


1870 


Rev. Henry Hill. 


720 


Thomas Hill. 


1899 


Walter Arthur Copinger 



Thus, for nearly a thousand years, there has been no break in the continuity 
of the lords. This unbroken continuity through all these ages is a powerful testi- 
mony to the stability which has been one of the most marked characteristics of the 
institutions of this favoured country. Such a period, indeed, forms a long interval 
in human history, and equals the period which spans the bridge of time between 
Charlemagne and Louis the XIV., and Egbert and Cromwell, Alfred the Great and 
George I., Edward the Confessor and Edward VII. 



CHAPTER IV 
Free Tenants of the Manor of Buxhall and their Holdings 

AT the beginning of the sixteenth century there were over 80 free tenants 
holding 300 acres and upwards in the parish of Buxhall, and 70 acres in 
the parish of Finborough. They also held 38 separate tenements. Most of 
these free tenancies have ceased to exist by reason of their having been acquired 
by the lord of the Manor and merged in the general estate. We propose to 
specify merely the free tenancies which it has not been possible to identify or 
which are still held of the lord by service or yearly rent, suit of court and 
fealty. To each a relief is also incident on death or alienation. Among the tenants 
of the Manor we meet with several persons of distinction, as, for instance, the Duke 
of Norfolk, Lord Howard, Lord de Morley, Lord Berghersh, Sir Robert Haughton, 
one of the Justices of the King's Bench, Sir John Hungerford, Sir John Gilbert, 
Sir Thomas Timperley, Sir Robert and Sir Henry North, Sir John Spring, Sir 
Thomas Rivett, and Dr. Wollaston. 

In 1627 the free tenants of the Manor were as follows: — 

1. 

Two tenements Foots and Kybes with 10 acres of land, meadow and pasture, 
lying in Buxhall in a way called Garner's Street. 

Sept. 30, 5 Eliz., John Crosse did fealty for. Rent iiij'' [but for tenement Footys 
and 10 acres late in tenure of James Crosse it is said in the Court held July 15, 
5 Eliz., that from the Rolls of Rich. II. the yearly rent was xxij'']. This land 
now belongs to the writer, but it cannot be identified further than that both sides 
of the street in question at this spot are owned by him. 

2. 

Fenn Street. 
Six [.? 15] acres meadow and pasture lying at Fenn Street, at rent of iij'' iiij''. 
Sept. 30, I Mary, John Salter of Badwell sold to William Pylberow and he did 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 133 

fealty, and Sept. 30, i Eliz., Joan Pilbarow acknowledged that she held as late of 
William Pilbarow formerly of John Salter, and did fealty. Dec. 7, 30 Eliz., found 
that William Pylborowe had sold "certain lands and 15 acres lying at Fenn Street 
at yearly rent of iij^ iiij'' to John Golesmith gent and John Mayhewe." The last 
is probably the same land as is found March 29, i Jac. I., to belong to Robert 
Grymsey in right of his wife, the description is " one tenement lying in Buxhall 
and 1 5 acres of land formerly of John Salter of Badwell of the yearly rent of 
iij^ iiij"." 



Two {4 Jac. I. One 9 Jac. I.] tenements and 5 acres of land lying in Buxhall, 
between land of Thomas Harte and on the Highway leading from Fenn Street 
towards the Church of Buxhall, one head abutting on land of Manor of Buxhall, 
and the other head on the Highway aforesaid at rent of iij'*. 

Found Sept. 30, 4 Jac, that John Shribb took from Thomas Allen and did 
fealty, and March 29, 9 Jac. I., that John Shribb and Edward Carter alias Morgan 
had held and that Edward Carter alias Morgan had died, and that Reginald Carter 
alias Morgan was his son and heir. 



Certain lands and tenements lying in Buxhall, late in the tenure of Thomas 
Taylor by the yearly rent of ij' vi''. 

Found Sept. 30, 6 Jac. I., Thomas Ryvett died seised and same were then in 
tenure, and possession of Edward Ryvett his son, and the bailiff was commanded 
to warn the said Edward Ryvett to be at the next court to pay and do to the lord 
of this Manor the rent, fealty, and all other things, &c. 

5. 

Brettenham Street. 

One tenement called Sieelys [2 and 3 Phil, and Mary ; Leelys, 3 and 4 Phil, 
and Mary], with 12 acres of land in Buxhall at Bretenham Street. 

Sept. 30, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, found that John Taleur had died seised 
and left same to Joan his wife for life, and at her death to his son Thomas Taleur. 
Sept. 30, 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary, Joan did fealty and paid rent of iij" iiij'' as 
also I Eliz. 



134 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

6. 

A piece of land called Aldevvock held at rent of iiij^, and one tenement and 
1 1 acres of land meadow and pasture formerly Spitlemans at yearly rent of xx'', 
with the appurtenances lying in Brettenham Street in Buxhall. 

August 6, 4 Jac. I., Edward Crosse did fealty, having purchased from Rev. 
Edward Ball. See No. 2 2. 

7. 

One piece of land called Gorey Croft containing by estimation 2 acres and a 
half lying in Buxhall among lands of the Manor of LefFey on the east, and the high- 
way called Spetyllman Strete on the west, and abutting at one head upon lands of 
John Spryng, Knight [i Eliz., William] called Herdhedder meadowe towards the 
south [and upon Styllemans Strete towards the north], at rent of ij'' viij'\ 

Granted by lord out of hand 4 Edw. VI. to William Bradstett. 

Sept. 30, I Eliz., it was found that William Bradstrete lately held, and that 
John Bradstrete was his senior son and of full age. He came to the court and 
refused to receive the land out of the hands of the lord, and it was consequently 
" commanded to the Bailiff to provide to the lord a new tenant, &c." Proclamation 
was made for a tenant April 14, 5 Eliz. 



One acre of land lying at Buxhall at the yearly rent of xiiij"^, and one tene- 
meiit called Footes and half another acre lying in Buxhall in Brettenham Street 
formerly of John Wood, and formerly at the yearly rent of vij'' and work three 
days in the autumn and other services, but now by the assent of the lord and 
tenant holding at the yearly rent of ij' vj'' and other services. 

Richard Wood found March 29, i Jac. I. (1603), to be seised. 



One piece of land in a certain close called Highgate, lying in Buxhall between 
land known as Bradstreet and a footpath, one head abutting on the Highway and 
the other on land called Quailstone, at rent of xviij''. 

Found Oct. 6, 1630, that John Sheepe died seised and that Edward Sheepe 
was his son and heir. 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 135 

10. 

Three acres of land parcel of a certain field called the " Melle Felde," at yearly 
rent of iiij''. 

April 24, 3 Edw. VI. John Lacy paid up arrears of rent for 5 years. 

11. 

One tenement called Tylekiln, with two pieces of land containing four acres, one 
piece containing two acres, parcel of Mellefylde in Buxhalle and lying between lands 
of the Manor of Buxhalle and land of the Manor of Leffey, one head abutting on 
lands of the Manor of LefFey aforesaid and the other upon a certain road of the 
lord of the said Manor of Buxhall, the second piece containing two acres of bond land 
in Buxhall aforesaid, parcel of Mellefelde and abutting on the Melle damme, at the 
yearly rent for the two pieces of iiij", and rent of comb from three weeks in 
three weeks. 

Granted by lord out of hand to John Osborne, i Eliz. (1558), for life only. 

12. 

High Street. 

One piece of land called Myll hyll containing by estimation six acres lying 
[3 and 4 Phil, and Mary, in a certain field called Huyfeld] in Buxhall, one head 
abutting on the Highway called High Street in Buxhall, and the other head abutting 
on the Manor of Canteloes Hall and tenements anciently held free at the rent of iij'' 
[3 and 4 Phil, and Mary ij^ iiij'']- 

Sept. 30, 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary, Thomas Sellowes did fealty, and Robert 
Sellows, alias Smyth, acknowledged, Sept. 30, 10 Eliz. Sept. 30, 5 Jac. I. 
John Sellowes, jun., did fealty. John Sellowes sold to Margaret, wife of George 
French, gent., one close on Mill hill containing five acres, and she, March 9, 
21 Car. T., conveyed to the said George French. 

13. 

Two pieces of land at Highstreet called Smythe's land, now called Bentall's 
croft, at yearly rent of iij^ And four acres of land called Mill Hill abutting on 
High Street at yearly rent of x'', and one tenement called Goldyings, one tenement 
called Bendies, and one acre and three rods pasture called Parkyns croft, and four 
acres of land called Sicolls, at yearly rent of iiij^ iij''. 



136 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Robert Sellowes acknowledged April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary. William 
Smyth found March 29, i Jac. I., to have held six acres called Hyghefield at High- 
strete, with one tenement and four acres of land formerly of Thomas Smyth at the 
rent of ij' iiij'', and at same time found that Henry Rychar held four acres called 
Mill Hill, late Robert Sellowes, at rent of Vi'f, part of a larger rent and ten acres 
of land remaining in the hands of Robert Sellowes and apportioned with consent of 
lord. 

14. 

A piece of meadow containing two acres [i^- 1629] with the appurtenances 
in Buxhall adjoining the way leading to High Street, and thence to a tenement 
called Wardes [the Butterfly] at rent of xvj'' [1628 xviij'*]. 

Found April 14, 26 Eliz., that John Norteley had sold to Rose Barker [? Baker], 
widow, who did fealty. March 29, i Jac. I., George Baker did fealty, and found 
March 28, 1621, that he had sold to William Chinrye. 

Found Oct. 8, 21 Jac. I., that William Chinerye had died seised, and that Martin 
Chinerye was his son and heir, and he paid relief April 16, 1628, and sold to 
Daniel Richer, who did fealty April 15, 1629. 

15. 

One tenement called Edwardys. 

Found July 22, 2 Mary, that the warden of the parish church of Fynbarowe 
magna had drawn ij'' halfpenny of yearly rent out of it for divers years then elapsed 
and it was commanded to the bailiff to distrain. 

16. 

One close called Cringlinos at rent of vj''. 

April 25, 1639, Jeremias Garner paid relief, having taken under will of Robert 
Garner his father. Found Jan. 21, 1649, that Jeremias had died and that Jeremias 
Garner was his son and heir. 

17. 

Four acres of land lying in Buxhall at rent of ij''. 

Found May i, 1641, that Jeremias Garner had purchased of Thomas Chaplyn. 

18. 

Certain lands at rent of 'f 9''. 

Found June 16, 1647, that Thomas Lockwood held in right of his wife, Anne, 
April 5, 1670, Edward Lockwood, son, paid relief on his father's death. 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 137 

19. 

One piece of meadow containing by estimation one rod and a half. 

Found April 14, 21 Car. I., that Thomas Bugge had died seised, and by his 
will left to John Bugge, who paid relief March 28, 1649. Found August 15, 1670, 
that John Bugge had died. 

20. 

Certain lands at yearly rent of vj'', and other land at yearly rent called Willi- 
sons ; Rent ij. 

Found April 24, 3 Edw. VI., that Henry Smyth, alias Bayly, died seised, and 
court ignorant of particulars. This is possibly Taylor's Croft. 

21. 

One messuage built on a croft of half an acre of land pertaining to said 
messuage at rent of one " clavis garofoli." 

Sept. 30, 4 Edw. VI., found Margaret Salter died seised, and that John Salter 
was her son and heir. 

22. 

One piece of land lying in Alderworlce, at one time in the tenure of Edward 
Langmer lying between land formerly of Walter Fote, then of John Woode on the 
one part and land formerly of the said Edward Langmer since of William Bert on 
the other part, at the yearly rent of iiij''. 

Sept. 30, 4 Edw. VI., William Berte and John Taylor, wardens of the church 
of Buxhall, acknowledged that they held free and paid arrears of rent for six years. 
This is probably part of No. 6. 

23. 

One piece of land containing one acre and a half, including hedge and ditch 
lying in Buxhall called Gream Any Croft, lying between land of Robert Collen, 
afterwards of Robert Tenwyther, on the one part, and the way leading to the Church 
of Buxhall on the other part, abutting on a meadow of the Manor of Robert Salter 
called Standons meadow, then of John Cage and the said Robert Collen towards 
the west. 

Sept. 30, 4 Edw. VI., Richard Collen acknowledged that he held with Christine 
his wife, and that same was formerly in the holding of George Salter, alias Smyth. 

19 



138 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

24. 

Certain lands free of the Manor at the yearly rent of iij*^ iiij''. 

April 8, 5 Edw. VI., Robert Sellovvys, son and heir of John Selowys, acknow- 
ledged and did fealty for. 

25. 

One messuage and divers lands and tenements held free at rent of xxij^ vj"*. 

Sept. 30, 6 Edw. VI., Edward Salter acknowledged that he held in free socage 
and did fealty, and found Sept. 30, i Mary (1552), that he had died, and that 
John Salter was his son and next heir and Margaret Salter his widow. 

Sept. 30, 1 1 Eliz., it was found that Edward Salter had died, holding at his 
death his capital messuage and divers lands sometime bond but afterwards sold to 
him free by deed of Henry Coppenger, Esq., at one time lord of the Manor, 
reserving to himself a certain yearly rent of xxij* vj'', and for a relief xxij" vj'' and 
suit of court as appears in the deed to the said Edward by the said Henry Coppenger. 

" Whansoever the said Edward his heyers or assignes shall happen to dye beinge 
owner of the forseyd land that than such persone or persons as shall come to the same 
by dyscent or by any last will or by any other devise conveyaunce or assuraunce of 
the same," &c. 

It was found that John Salter was Edward's only son and heir. April 15, 
1629, Robert Browne did fealty for these premises, having taken of Edward 
Salter. April 5, 1670, William Brown having died his son and heir, Robert 
Brown, paid a relief. 

26. 

Land late of Robert Cenwyner at rent of xx^ iiij''. 

Sept. 30, I Mary, found that Edward Salter died seised, and that John Salter 
was his son and next heir. 

27. 

One tenement and ten acres of land held free of the Manor. 

Found July 22, 2 Mary, that John Taylor died seised. 

28. 

One cottage and four acres of land [7 Eliz., formerly of John Tyntons] held 
by knight's service at rent of ij' viij'' [7 Eliz. as appears from the 3rd Roll of 
Hen. V. and 5 Hen. VI.]. 

April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, Henry Martin did fealty for, and Richard 
Sare did fealty for, Oct. i, 7 Ehz. 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 139 



Divers parcels and pieces of land lying in Buxhall at ij' viij''. 

I Eliz., Robert Rednall acknowledged that he held free of the Manor the same 
having been formerly Christine Crosse's, and he did fealty. Robert Rydnall, Sept. 30, 
5 Jac. I., did fealty, he had same after death of Christiana Rydnall, wid. Robert 
Rydnall, by will Nov. 7, 1631, devised to his kinsman, Robert Ridnall, who paid 
a relief April 20, 1632. 

30. 

Three acres of land called White erthe lying at Popes Lane between land of 
Robert Bradstrete and the said way called Popes Lane, at rent of ij'' held by knight's 
service. 

Formerly of John Howe and Anne his wife, and Elizabeth Orwknall, daughters 
and heiresses of Robert Hylle. Richard Sare, i Eliz., did fealty. 

Sept. 30, 8 Eliz., Thomas Sellowse, alias Smyth, did fealty, and Sept. 30, 
10 Eliz., Robert Sellows, alias Smith, acknowledged that he held. 

March 29, i Jac. I., Richard Smyth found to hold, stated to be formerly of 
Richard Hart. 

31. 

One messuage and acres of land adjoining, formerly Tynlors, at rent 

of v''. 

James Crosse, i Eliz., did fealty for these premises which formerly belonged 
to Robert Crosse. 



A Tenement called Whitings [Phil, and Mary, Whytynges], late of Thomas 
Talmage with 15 " le seeches" {sic) [5 Phil, and Mary, le Stetchers] parcel of one 
field called Heygate, at rent of v''. 

Sept. 30, I Eliz., it was commanded to distrain William Cook as he had failed 
to do fealty for, and April 26, 35 Eliz., it was found that Robert Cooke and 
Katherine his wife had sold to John Doggett, who did fealty. 

33. 

Certain lands held at rent of iiij''. 

Sept. 30, 2 Eliz., found that Andreas Salter had died seised and a relief of 
iiij'' had accrued to lord. 



140 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

34. 

One messuage with a piece of land arable lately called Foots, at rent of v*^ and 
on death one horse, three sheep, and other services. 

And one other messuage called Cakebreds containing two acres and a half of 
land and pasture, at rent of ij'' j''. 

John Wood took, 5 Hen. VI., and Richard Wood his son, who took under his 
father's will, and had Oct. 4, Hen. VIII., acknowledged that he held April 14, 5 
Eliz. March 24, 22 Jac. I., John Heigham found to have sold to Robert Browne, 
gent., who did fealty. 

35. 

Six acres of land called Semans Croft at rent of vj"*, and one acre of land called 
ylder, lying between land of the Rectory of Finborough and the Highway leading to 
Hecham, one head abutting on land of the Town of Finborough called Modyes 
towards the south and lands of the said town towards the — 

John Sellowes alias Smyth acknowledged that he held Oct. i, 7 Eliz. 

36. 

Certain land called Myndysos at yearly rent of ij''. 

Found Oct. 7, 14 Eliz., that Robert Martin had died seised, and that Thomas 
Martyn was his son and next heir, and he did fealty. 

37. 

One tenement called Reders with two pieces of land, containing by estimation 
eight \jeven i Jac. I.] acres, lying in Buxhall, at the yearly rent of xiiij''. 

Found March 27, 19 Eliz., that John Salter, sen., died seised, and that John 
Salter, jun., was his son and next heir. John Salter was found to be owner 
March 29, i Jac. I. 

38. 

One house and one piece of pasture containing one rod and one parcel of 
land containing two acres one rod, lying in Buxhall, at yearly rent of xvj''. 

Found March 27, 19 Eliz., that Richard Reynolds had sold to Robert Fynche, 
who did fealty, and found April 14, 26 Eliz., that Robert Fynche had sold [two 
acres] to Henry Gilbert, Esq. 

39. 

One piece of land containing by estimation three acres adjoining glebe of the 
Rectory of Buxhall, between customary land of the Manor of Great Finborough and 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 141 

lands adjoining to this iVIanor and a meadow called Piclcards iVIeadow, with the 
appurtenances, in Buxhall, at rent of xviij''. 

Found Oct. 8, 21 Jac. I., and April 29, i Car. I., that Daniel Pulford, of 
Battisford, had sold to one Keble. 

40. 

One close of land and pasture divided into two parts called Heygates, con- 
taining by estimation twelve acres, lying in Buxhall near the way called Heygate 
Lane, at the rent of xviij''. 

John Sheepe March 24, 22 Jac. I., attorned tenant. 

41. 

One piece of land called Branchifield, containing by estimation six acres, at 
yearly rent of viiij''. 

Abraham Salter, who took under the will of his father George Salter, did 
fealty April 22, 2 Car I. 

42. 

One messuage with the appurtenances called Longmas [22 Eliz., Longmere], 
situate in Buxhall, at the rent of iij'' [22 Eliz. iij''.] 

Found June i, 22 Eliz., that Joan Ellice, widow, who held for life had died, 
and Richard Ellice, son of Andreas Ellice, who was entitled in remainder, paid a 
relief of iiij'' to the Bailiff of the Manor to the use of the lord and did fealty in 
full court. 

Found April 20, 1632, that John Studd had died, and that Anna, wife of 
Henry Sier, Katherine Studd, and Mary Studd were his daughters, and they paid 
the relief. See Nos. 6 and 22. 

43. 

One close of land lying in Buxhall, containing six acres, at rent of ij" vj''. 

Edward Death did fealty May i, 1633, on purchase from Benedict Posford. 
In Court Nov. 18, 15 Car. I., it was found that Edward Death had died, and 
that Thomas Death was his eldest son and heir ; but the rent is stated to be lo"^ 
only. 

Found April 8, 1662, that Thomas Death had died, and that Thomas Death 
was his son and heir. 



142 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

44. 

One close of land called Upper Bainow and one other close called Nether 
Banyers, at rent of ij'' vj''. 

Found April 15, 1635, that Richard Martin had died, and that Richard Martin 
was his son and heir and aged four years. 

45. 

One close of pasture with the appurtenances called Sofforns, containing by 
estimation three acres, lying in Buxhall, at the rent of iiij''. 

Found April 3, 20 Eliz., that Thomas Salter, sen., had died, and by will given 
same to his wife for life with remainder to Thomas Salter his son, whereby there 
had accrued to the lord a relief of iiij''. March 29, i Jac. I., found that Thomas 
Hart held these premises which formerly belonged to Andreas Salter. Possibly same 
as No. 33. 

46. 

Certain lands held free of the manor at the yearly rent of xx"*. 

Found Dec. 7, 30 Eliz., that John Jower had, died seised, and that Henry 
Jower was his son and next heir. 

47. 

Certain lands and tenements lying in Buxhall at yearly rent of iij"" v'', and 
certain lands also lying in Buxhall at the yearly rent of iij" viij'', called 
Wyllyshams rent. 

Found April 26, 35 Eliz., that Robert Sellowes had died seised. 

48. 

One messuage and six acres of land, meadow and pasture, lying in Buxhall, 
at the yearly rent of iiij''. 

Found in Elizabeth's time that William Pilberowe and had died seised, and by 
will Alice his wife had for life with remainder to John Pilberowe, son of the said 
William Pilberowe and Alice, and Alice did fealty. 



49. 

One piece of land pasture containing one rod, lying in Soneldis, late Cokerells. 
Elizabeth's time found to belong to William Terye, gent. 



In Eli 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 143 

50. 

Two acres of land at Balton Hill, at one time of Roger Hawley, at yearly 
rent of iiij''. 

Found March 29, i Jac. I., to belong to Henry Jewer. 

51. 

Two tenements with the appurtenances in Buxhall. 

Found Sept. 30, 4 Jac. I., that Henry Sowgate, sen., who held for life had 
died, and that Joan his wife then held for life. 

52. 

Three acres of land, &c., at rent of iiij''. 

John Griggs did fealty for March 29, 9 Jac. I. 

53. 

One tenement and ten acres lying in Buxhall at rent of viij''. 

Found April 26, 161 5, that John Moteham had sold to John Salter, sen., and 
John Salter, jun. 

54. 

One tenement and nine acres lying in Buxhall. 

April 26, 161 5, William Jower who held for life with remainder to his son. 
William Jower did fealty. 

55. 

Three acres of land in Buxhall at rent of viij''. 

Found Oct. II, 16 1 6, that Mark Salter had died seised, having by will 
devised to his wife Joan for life with remainder to William Salter, son and heir of 
John Salter, the brother of the said Mark Salter, and Dec. 13, 1616, John Salter 
paid relief. 

56. 

One piece of arable land with one piece of pasture to the same belonging, 
which contains in itself one acre and one rod. 

Richard Woode April 14, 5 Eliz., acknowledged that he held under three 
charters, one dated Tuesday next after the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel 
1 1 Edw., IV., and he did fealty. 



144- History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Free Lands of the Manor of Buxhall Lying in Finborough. 

57. 

One acre of land and one- acre meadow abutting on the Horsewager [20 Eliz., 
Horse-Mayre] at Boyton Hall in Great Finborough, formerly of John Metwold, 
afterwards of John Wenieve, held at the rent of iij'' ; and one messuage and certain 
lands with the appurtenances called Oathet [20 Eliz., Oake Streete Ferm parcel of 
land, late of John Joes], and a certain piece of land containing two acres and one 
piece called Scotyna meadow at rent of ix''. 

Sept. 30, 4 Ed. VI., Thomas Timperley did fealty. Found April 3, 20 Eliz., 

that he had sold the one-acre meadow to Nicholas Tymperley, his son, and (sic) 

his wife, but at a Court held March 24, 22 Jac. I., found that Richard Timperley, 
who held lands late of Thomas Timperley, namely, one acre of land and one acre 
meadow abutting on the Horsewager at Boyton Hall, held at the rent of iij'', and 
diverse lands, meadow and pasture, called Oake Street Ferme, parcel of land, late 
of John Joes, held at the annual rent of ix'', as appeared by the Roll, 2 Eliz., 
died since last Court, and that Sir Thomas Timperley, Knt., was his son and heir. 
Found Feb. 26, 165 1, that Edward Weneve, Esq., had purchased of Sir Thomas 
Timperley, and April 13, 1659, that Edward Weneve had died and that George 
Weneve was his son and heir. 

58. 

One croft or piece of land lying in Great Finborough, called Qualstone 
[i Mary, Queelstone], containing four acres, at rent of iiij''. 

Sept. 30, I Mary, Michael Talmache did fealty ; March 29, i Jac. I., Richard 
Man did fealty, holding for life with remainder to his son, Michael Mann, who 
sold to Sir John Gilbert, who August 6, 4 Jac. I., did fealty. 



One piece of Alder Grove meadow, lying in Great Finborough at Joes [Ives] 
Mill, containing by estimation half an acre, between the Highway leading as far as 
Burfordebrege towards the south, and the stream running from a certain mill called 
Ives Mill towards Combesbrege on the part of the north, one head abutting on 
land, late of John Ives, called Boyton Fen, towards the west, and the other head 
abutting on Alder Grove of a certain William Lyng, called Castrell Fen, towards the 
east. At rent of x''. 

Grant to John Wage, jun., and his heirs April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary. 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 145 

60. 

One piece of pasture and one wood called Higgat [1556, Heygate, 1603] 
Field in Finborough, containing by estimation in the whole fifteen acres, lying 
between land of Robert Bradstret on one part — and on the other part at yearly rent 
of xviij''^. 

Robert Bradstret, son and heir of Robert Bradstret, acknowledged he held 
April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, and John Shypp, March 29, i Jac. I. 

61. 

Three acres of land called Lepkyns, lying in Great Finborough, at rent of 
vj'', formerly belonged to Richard Chestons, then to Richard Bradstret, and Robert 
Bradstret did fealty for, April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary. 

62. 

A piece or parcel of land in Great Finborough containing eight acres, at rent 
of ij' iij''. 

Thomas Sellows alias Smith did fealty Sept. 30, 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary. 

63. 

One piece of land anciently called Overierdge, late John Henrys, and since 
Tyntons, in Great Finborough, with the house, lately decayed now newly built, 
lying between land of the Manor of Adders Hall on the north, called Smalhobbys, 
and land of Michael Talmage on the south, one head abutting on land of the said 
Michael Talmage, and the other head on west abutting on the road called Cog- 
many's Lane, containing by estimation one rod more or less. 

Thomas Harwyn did fealty in the time of Elizabeth. 

64. 

One acre and a rod of land called Edwardes, at the yearly rent of i'', for- 
merly Bradstreets, and one tenement called Cockwells lying in Finborough, at 
the yearly rent of j'', formerly of Thomas Nene, at the yearly rent of viij'', late of 
the said Thomas, at the yearly rent of vj'', and premises of Robert Fyches, who 
held free of the Manor two acres of land called the Tufte, formerly of Thomas 
Rogers, at the yearly rent of ij''. 

William Smyth and Robert Fyches, under the name of the Feoffees of Great 

20 



146 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Finborough, held March 29, i Jac. I. It was found, April 26, 16 15, that Robert 
Fytches died seised of one acre and a half lying in Buxhall. 

65. 

One tenement called Whytemans and one garden in Great Finborough at rent 
of iiij'', and five "virgate" of land parcel of Heygate in Finborough aforesaid at 
rent of j''. 

Found Oct. II, 161 6, that John Robwood, who held these, had died seised, 
and Maria Robwood and Helen Robwood were his daughters and co-heiresses. 



One tenement and divers lands and tenements in Great Finborough at rent of 
xxiij'' (two acres of land, once of Roger Harley, lying at Barren Hill in Fin- 
borough at yearly rent of iij''), and half an acre of land in Finborough aforesaid, 
once of Tynbonds, at yearly rent of j''. 

Found Oct. II, 14 Jac. I., that Henry Jower had died seised, and that 
Elizabeth, then wife of Thomas Taylerd, was his daughter and heiress. 

67. 

One close called Nicholls, containing four acres, lying in Great Finborough, 
between the land of the Manor of Cantloes and land of Thomas Fuller, one head 
abutting on the land of John Sellows towards the west and the other upon 
Weather Street Lane towards the East. 

John Sellowes sold to Edward Sier, as found Feb. 26, 1651. At the same 
time a rent of vij' j'' was apportioned, George French paying for a close called Mill 
Hill xx"*, and Edward Sier for above xxj'', and Dorothy, wife of William Sier, for 
the residue iiij'' j''. 

68. 

Tenements called Cokerells in Little Finborough, by name " Villat de fFyn- 
barough," at rent of ij. 

It was found July 22, 2 Mary, that the warden of the Church of Little 
Finborough had drawn one penny a year rent for divers years then elapsed out 
of this, and it was commanded to the bailiff to distrain. 

Sept. 30, I Eliz., Thomas Bute paid xvj'' for sixteen years' arrears of rent. 



Free Tenants of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 147 

69. 

Certain lands in Great Finborough at rent of viij''. 

Elizabeth, wife of Edward Hobard, late wife of Henry Smyth, did fealty 
Sept. 30, I Mary. 

70. 

Two pieces of land, meadow and pasture, with the appurtenances, containing 
fifteen acres, lying in Great Finborough and Buxhall, at rent of xviij''. 

Michael Talmache, Sept. 30, i Mary, did fealty. The premises afterwards 
belonged to Ambrose Corbold, and he sold to Richard Saer, who did fealty Oct. i, 
15 Eliz., and Feb. 24, 1606, Robert Jewer did fealty. 

71. 

Two acres of land parcel ot Bawkefield lying in Great Finborough. 
March 29, 9 Jac. I., Edward Marten did fealty. 

72. 

Divers lands and tenements called Welescom lying in Great Finborough, now 
called "Talons," containing by estimation nine acres lying near lands, late 
Tyntons, on the east, and lands of the Manor of Finborough Hall on the west, 
at a yearly rent of xxiij''^. 

Formerly belonged to Robert Jower, and his son, John Jower, 4 Edw. VI., 
did fealty for same. 



CHAPTER V 
The Copyholders of the Manor of Buxhall and their Holdings 

(i) Gates Coates. (8) Small Hobbs. 

(2) Meare Picks Aggletts and (9) Land near Mill-Green. 
Longmers and Little Boycroft. 

(3) Cocksalls. Enfranchised. 

(4) Barbers and Berts. (10) Smythcs and Seven Acres. 

(5) Symthes and Bradstrets. (11) Woodfield. 

(6) Hawes. (12) Fundlings or Barons. 

(7) Paynes Croft and Benets Meadow. (13) Pye Hatch Farm. 

(i) Gates Cotes 

A TENEMENT with garden and orchard, customary and heriotable, called 
Cotes [16 16 Cates Cotes], containing one rod, lying in Buxhall between 
the highway leading to Rattlesden and a croft called Taylors Croft, one 
head abutting on the said croft and the other on a meadow formerly of Francis 
Bacon, gent., but then of Galfrid Parkard, late of Robert Browne, gent., called 
Skondons meadow ; rent iij''. 

In the time of Henry VIII. this property was held by Clemens Warren, who, 
with Margaret his wife, surrendered same conditionally to Richard Collen, Sept. 30, 
4 Edw. VI., who before Sept. 30, 9 Eliz., had sold to John Salter, son of John 
Salter, sen., who was then admitted. This John Salter, jun., sold to Thomas 
Harlying, who was admitted Oct. 7, 14 Eliz. Thomas Harlying or Hawyn, by his 
will June 8, 33 Eliz., gave this property to his wife Margaret during widowhood, 
with remainder to John her son. Margaret was admitted August 31, 33 Eliz., and 
Oct. 26, 1608, sold her life interest to Joan Lane, wife of Henry Lane. On death 
of Margaret and John, Thomas, the brother of John, succeeded, and he surrendered 
to Anne Locke, Oct. 11, 161 6. She died leaving her brother and heir Ananias 
Smythe, who was admitted March 28, 1621, and who, March 30, 3 Car. I., 
surrendered to Abraham Rudland, who was admitted April 16, 4 Car. I., and he 
sold to William Bowie May 12, 1633, who was admitted on April 23, 1634. 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 149 

He surrendered Oct. i, 1634, conditionally to Nathaniel Maiden, who was admitted 
April 15, 1635, and by his will August 13, 15 Car. II., devised the property to 
Abigail Stassord (whom he intended to make his wife) for her life, with remainder 
to John Maiden, his eldest son. Abigail was admitted Oct. 4, 1670, and John 
Maiden the son, Nov. 4, 1678 ; and he Jan. 7, 1703, sold to John Griggs, of 
Buxhall, yeoman. John Griggs died, and his son John Griggs was admitted July 9, 
17 1 7. John Griggs, eldest son and heir of the last John Griggs, was admitted 
Nov. 6, 1756, the premises being then described as "One messuage or tenement 
with the outhouses and yard thereto belonging, situate in Buxhall between the 
lands of John Bowie east and the lands of Sarah Sulyard widow west, abutting on 
the highway south and on the lands of Sarah Coppinger widow north, in the 
tenure and occupation of Thomas Howard." The last John Griggs sold to John 
Manning Feb. 19, 1766, who was admitted May 30, 1766, and Nov. 8, 1770, 
sold to Daniel Jacob, of Buxhall, yeoman, who was admitted July 30, 1771, 
and on his death his eldest son and heir, Daniel Jacob, was admitted May 19, 
1777. Daniel Jacob the son, Dec. 18, 1777, sold to Thomas Dykes, of Brettenham, 
yeoman, who was admitted March 26, 1779 ; and on his death his eldest son, 
Thomas Dykes, of Buxhall, yeoman, was admitted Dec. 23, 1823. Thomas Dykes 
the son by will Jan. 6, 1843, appointed Frederic Rands Melton and Isaac 
Clover his executors, and authorised them to sell. This they did by deed Dec. 27, 
1849, t° Mary Otterwell, wife of Zachariah Otterwell, of Bricet, yeoman, and she 
was admitted Feb. 8, 1850. Mary Otterwell married a second time one Laflin, 
and being a widow, by her will June 2, 1883, appointed Thomas Stearn executor 
and trustee, and gave the above property to such uses as he should appoint with 
the intent that he should sell the same. She died Jan. 15, 1884, and Thomas 
Stearn sold to Thomas William Dykes, of Beyton, labourer, July 7, 1884, with 
the additional description — " formerly in the occupation of the Widow Pain since 
of Robert Dykes and John Welham and now Henry Welham and one un- 
occupied." Thomas William Dykes was admitted Dec. 6, 1889, and he sold 
Oct. 14, 1890, to William Richer, of Rattlesden, bricklayer, who was admitted 
August 17, 1899. 



(2) Meare Picks or Marle Pikes 
One piece of land, customary and heriotable, called Meare Picks or Marie 
Pikes, containing three acres lying in Buxhall between lands parcel of the manor of 



150 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

LefFey [1619, LeafFey] and lands called Barleycorn parcel of the said Manor of 
LefFey, one head abutting on lands of the Manor of LefFey called Backhouse fields 
and the other on Mill Street. Rent iij' i''. 

B. 

Aggletts and Longmers. 

Two tenements, customary and heriotable, lying in a certain hamlet called 
Brettenham Street [2 Eliz., Breton Strete alias], one called Aggletts and the other 
land called Langmers with five acres of land and pasture in Buxhall between free 
land, formerly of Richard Wood, before of John Wood his father, and afterwards 
of John Higham, held of this manor, one head abutting on land of the Manor of 
Cockerells, and the other on the said Street called Brettenham Street. 

Rent of iiij" ij'' as appears by Rolls 2 Hen. VIIT. 

C. 

Little Boycroft. 
A croft of land, customary and heriotable, called Little Boycroft, with the 
appurtenances containing five acres [22 Eliz., formerly of Henry Muskett and 
Margaret his wife and afterwards of Harry Richer, sen.], lying in Buxhall between 
land of the Manor of Buxhall called Great Boycroft towards the east, and land of 
the Manor of Lefi^ey towards the west, one head abutting on a meadow called 
Holbeck Meadow towards the south, and the other head abutting on the highway 
towards the north. Rent iiij'. 

A and C were in the time of Henry VIIL in Henry Muskett and i Edw. 
VL were surrendered by Alice Muskett and William Bradstret to Henry Richar, 
who April 8, 5 Edw. VL, sold to Robert Osborne. 

B was in the time of Henry VIIL in John Woode, he having been admitted 
36 Hen. VIIL By his will he devised same to Richard Woode, who was admitted 
April 14, 5 Eliz., and also acquired A. Both A and B he sold April 2, 16 19, 
to John Heigham, who was admitted June i, 1619, and he sold March 24, 22 
Jac. to Robert Browne, who was admitted same day. 

C passed from the Musketts to Daniel Richar, and he sold to Edward 
Rushe, who was admitted Jan. 26, 11 Jac. I., and May 26, 1630, he sold to the 
said Robert Browne, who was admitted same day. 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 151 

A, B, and C passed under the will of Robert Browne, April i, 1644, to his 
son Francis Browne, who was admitted April 14, 1645 5 Francis Browne, June 22, 
1668, surrendered to use of himself and Mary his wife and the survivor, with 
remainder to Frances Browne, widow, late wife of — Beaufoy deceased, for life, 
with remainder to use of Francis Browne and his heirs. On Oct 4, 1670, 
Francis Browne the settlor was admitted for life, and on his death Mary his 
widow was admitted for life Nov. 3, 1685, and on her death Frances Beaufoy was 
admitted for life April 12, 1687. These all being dead, William Brown, son of 
the above Francis, was admitted Sept. 20, 1 700. He died, and his nephew and 
heir, the Rev. Oliver Thorne, of Hemingstow, on the Jan. 5, 1704, sold to 
Francis Beales, of Woolpit, plumber, who was then admitted. Francis Beales, 
Sept. 27, 1731, sold to Sarah Sulyard, who by will Nov. 7, 1750, devised to her 
youngest son Francis Sulyard, who was admitted Aug. 26, 1765, and April 15, 
1777, he sold to Peter Upcher, of Sudbury, Esq., who was admitted May 19, 1777. 
His only son and heir, Abbott Upcher, who was admitted July 15, 1797, suffered 
a recovery by deed Oct. 21, 18 12, and covenanted to surrender to Robert Fuller. 
Robert Fuller by will Nov. 24, 18 12 [? May 11, 18 13], devised the lands 
contracted to be purchased to Robert Fuller Osborn, commonly called Robert 
Osborn Fuller, then residing at Ravens Hall, in Lindsay, farmer, son of Richard 
and Susan Osborn, of Nedging, for life, with remainder to Robert Osborn Fuller 
his son, for life, with remainder in tail male. Robert Fuller Osborn, the father, was 
admitted Sept. 21, 18 13, for life, and on his death Robert Fuller Osborn, the son, 
was admitted July 3, 1826. On August 21, 1850, Robert Good Fuller, of 
Stowmarket, gent., the first and eldest son of the said Robert Osborn Fuller, as 
tenant in tail male in remainder, barred the entail and conditionally surrendered by 
way of mortgage Feb. 12, 1852, to William James Owen Holmes, who was 
admitted Nov. 28, 1865. The mortgagee sold B to Charles Pilgrim Clover 
Nov. 30, 1865, who was admitted May 15, 1866, and sold same to John Henry 
Hammond, of Colchester, gent., Oct. 11, 1889, and he was admitted Oct. 26, 
1889. The mortgagee sold A and C to George John Septimus Gage Jan. 25, 
1866, who was admitted May 30, 1867, and Jan. 10, 1882, he sold to Alexander 
Clutterbuck, of Stowmarket, brewer, who was admitted Jan. i, 1883. He by deed 
Feb. 9, 1883, sold to Edward Greene, M.P., Edward Walter Greene, and 
Edward William Lake, all of Bury St. Edmunds, but died before having 
surrendered, and Edward Greene having also died on April 15, 1891, the said 
Edward Walter Greene and Edward William Lake were admitted Sept. 30, 1899. 



152 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

(3) COPHALLS OR COCKSALLS. 

A meadow called Cophalls [Coxhall, Cocksalls], meadow containing four 
acres lying at Crosstreet in Buxhall, between lands late of John Taylor [the land 
of the lord of the manor] and lands of the Manor of Leffey on the part of 
the north and the lands of Henry Copinger, Esq., and lands of the Manor of 
LefFey in part on the south, one head abutting on lands of the Manor of LefFey 
and the other on Crosstreet [Green] towards the west, and a parcel of land called 
Crossland containing two acres and a half, lying in Buxhall between lands of 
this manor on the north and land of the Manor of Leffey on the south, one head 
abutting on land of this manor towards the west, and the other head on lands of 
the Manor of Leffey towards the east. And another piece of land called the 
twenty acres and three closes or crofts of land and pasture lying at the farther end 
of the abovQ close, containing in the whole twenty-four acres in Buxhall, between 
land of the Manor of Leffey on the east and Crosstreet on the west, one head 
abutting on a meadow called Coxhall [Cocksalls] meadow towards the north, and 
the other head on Crossland in part and land of the said Henry Copinger [or 
of this manor] in part towards the south. Rent xxyj"" viii**. 

William Bert held this in the reign of Henry VIIL He died before Sept. 30, 
6 Edw. VL, having surrendered to William Bert his son and heir. William Bert 
the son April 26, 35 Eliz., surrendered to himself for life, with remainder to 
Edmund Randall, clerk, and Urseley his wife and the heirs of the said Urseley ; 
and Oct 28, 1603, the said William Bert, Edmund Randall, and Ursula his wife 
surrendered all the land they held, being about thirty acres lying in Buxhall, to 
Edward Darbye, who was admitted Oct. 28, conditionally, and Oct. 2, 3 Jac. L, 
absolutely ; and he Nov. 4, Jac. L, surrendered to Edward Ball, who August 6, 
4 Jac. L, sold to Edward Crosse. Edward Crosse, by will Feb. 22, 11 Car. L, 
directed his executor William Greene to sell his copyholds and to pay the proceeds 
to his grandchildren. William Greene, by deed Oct. 24, 12 Car. L, sold to Mary 
Browne, daughter of Robert Browne, of Bury St. Edmunds, gent., who was 
admitted April 19, 1637. She married John Applewaite, and died leaving her 
husband and her son and heir John Applewaite surviving, and the latter was 
admitted May 21, 17 Car. I. He seems to have sold to his uncle, William 
Browne who was admitted August 20, 1661, and he June 10, 1663, surrendered to 
Thomas Brown, of Lavenham, gent., who was admitted April 5, 1670. Thomas 
Brown, Feb. 28, 1672, sold to Thomas Chenery, of Eye, yeoman, who was 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 153 

admitted May 16, 1673. On Thomas Chenery's death in 1720 he was succeeded 
by his only son and next heir Thomas Chenery, who was admitted May 27, 1720, 
and by will August 18, 1742, devised all his property in Buxhall to his eldest 
son Stephen Chenery, who was admitted August 23, 1746, and Oct. 12, 1764, sold 
to Francis Whittaker who was admitted Oct. 22, 1764. He suffered a recovery 
(Sept. 9, 1773), and by will Dec. 24, 1784, devised all his freehold and copyhold 
estate in Buxhall to David Davidson, of London Wall, pawnbroker, and William 
Elgie, of the City of London, cornfactor, upon trust for sale, and they being 
admitted Dec. 26, 1786, by deed Dec. 23, 1786, sold to John Colton, who was 
admitted at same court as his vendors. John Colton by will March 21, 1795, 
devised all his estate in Buxhall which he purchased of the executors of his late 
uncle Whittaker to his wife Isabella Colton, who was admitted April 28, 1796. 
She by will Feb. 4, 1832, devised her lands in Buxhall in the occupation of 
Thomas Dykes to Mary Hobson, wife of her nephew John Hobson, of White- 
haven, upon trust to pay out of the rents to her nephew Anthony Hobson _£ioo 
for life and apply the residue towards maintenance of her five children William 
Mounsey Hobson, Isabella Colton Hobson, Mary Mounsey Hobson, Elizabeth Jane 
Hobson, and Sarah Ann Hobson, until twenty-one, arid then that Mary Hobson 
should take rents for life with a devise in remainder to the children above as 
tenants in common. Mary Hobson was admitted Feb. 8, 1833, and died May 14, 
1857. William Mounsey Hobson died Jan. 4, 1853, without issue and intestate, 
leaving George Mounsey Hobson his only brother and heir. Isabella Colton 
Hobson married Robert Henry Gibson, and died March 12, 1855, leaving him and 
Robert Gibson, her own child and heir. Sarah Ann Hobson married John Lawson 
Anderson, of Bares House, near Penrith, and George Mounsey Hobson, Robert 
Gibson, Mary Mounsey Hobson, Elizabeth Jane Hobson, and Sarah Ann Anderson 
were admitted as tenants in common Oct. 12, 1857. George Mounsey Hobson 
died intestate, leaving Mary Mounsey Hobson, Elizabeth Jane Hobson, and Sarah 
Ann Anderson, his only surviving sisters, and Robert Gibson, only child of Isabella 
Colton Gibson deceased, the only other sister of the said George Mounsey Hobson, 
co-heiresses and co-heir. They were accordingly admitted each to one-fifth, June 12, 
1867. Sarah Ann Anderson died intestate, and Mary Mounsey Hobson, Elizabeth 
Jane Hobson, and Robert Gibson were then admitted each to one-fifth and to 
one-fourth of another one-fifth on Sept. 9, 1867. Mary Mounsey Hobson, having 
married one Lamman, died Sept. 19, 1874, intestate, and without issue leaving 
Elizabeth Jane Hobson, her only surviving sister, and Robert Gibson, the only child 

21 



154 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

of her sister Isabella Coltoa Gibson deceased, heiress and co-heir. Elizabeth Jane 
Hobson died March 2°> 1^77) ^ spinster, and intestate, leaving her nephew, the 
said Robert Gibson, her heir, and he was admitted to the two equal third parts of 
the said Mary Mounsey Lamman and Elizabeth Jane Hobson on Dec. 17, 1890. 

In the Court held Dec. 4, 43 Eliz., it was presented that these were not 
ancient lands demisable, but first granted by Henry Coppinger, Esq., deceased, 
late lord of the manor, to William Beart, sen., April 8, 5 Edw. VI., and 
that William Beart, jun., Edward and Urcella, then claimed. 

(4) Barbers and Berts. 
Berts 5 Eliz. 
Twelve acres of land bond called Berts, with the appurtenances in Buxhall, 
formerly of John Tynton. 

Barbers 10 Eliz. 
One tenement called Barbours, containing one acre lying between the street 
called Hyghstrete and land of the Manor, one head abutting on land of John 
Dygbye, Esq., and the other on a way leading towards a tenement of Henry 
Murten. 

Barbers and Berts 30 Eliz. 
One tenement with a garden and certain lands bond and heriotable to the 
same tenement belonging and appertaining called Barbors, containing by estimation 
one acre more or less lying in Buxhall aforesaid, between a street there called 
Hyghe Streete on the one side and land of the said Manor on the other side, 
one head there abutting on land of Henry Gilbert, gent., and the other head 
abutting on the way there. Berts again described giving the northerly boundary 
as "a street or highway leading from the tenement of Sir Henry North to the 
street called Hiestreet grene in Finborough." 

Berts. 
In the time of Henry VIII. this belonged to Henry Murton, and he, 
Sept. 29, 15 Hen. VIII., surrendered to himself, William Murton and Joan 
his wife. Sept. 30, 5 and 6 Phil, and Mary, Henry Murton surrendered 
to James Crosse, who was admitted same day and died before July 15, 5 Eliz., 
and his brother, John Crosse, admitted that day. John Crosse, Sept. 30, 
5 Eliz., sold to Robert Partryche, who was admitted same day. 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 155 

Barhours. 
John Crosse was admitted to this i Edw. VI., and Sept. 30, 10 Eliz., 
sold to Robert Partriche, who was admitted same time. 

Barbours and Berts. 
Robert Partriche, Dec. 7, 30 KHz., surrendered to use of himself for life 
remainder to his executors and administrators for a short term, remainder to 
John Salter, jun., and Agnes his wife, daughter of the said Robert, for life, 
remainder to the heirs of the said John and Agnes. These last were admitted 
April 26, 35 Eliz., and Feb. 24, 1608, sold to John Catton, who Oct. 
8, 161 3, sold to John Bull, who was admitted same day, and Oct. 11, 
16 1 6, conditionally surrendered to Edward Bull, who was admitted same time. 
He, Sept. 4, 161 8, surrendered to Nathaniel Syer for life, remainder to 
Elizabeth Bull, a daughter of Edward Bull, then wife of Nathaniel Syer. 
Nathaniel Syer was admitted April 2, 161 9, and on his death Elizabeth, April 
25, 1639. She sold, Oct. 9, 1648, to Richard Pilborrowe who was admitted 
May 16, 1649. He sold to John Heywood, who was admitted May i, 
1657. John Heywood by his will, Dec. i, 1669, devised unto Margaret his 
" loveing wife all that his messuage or tenement wherein one Richard Last now 
dwelleth with all the houses buildings yards gardens orchyards lands meadowes 
pastures and feudings thereunto adioyninge beinge coppiehold of the Manor of 
Buxhall," with the appurtenances in Buxhall and commonly called by the names of 
Berts and Barbers or by any other name, to her and her heirs for ever, and 
Margaret Heywood was admitted April 5, 1670. From Margaret Heywood the 
property passed to John Brett who conditionally surrendered Nov. 20, 1696, and 
again Nov. 14, 1701, to Robert Davy, of Buxhall, who was admitted, and 
Feb. 5, 1 70 1, surrendered to Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Carpenter, of Buxhall, 
yeoman, and Thomas and Elizabeth surrendered — 

Berts Barbours. 

to Denney of Combs, yeoman, Berts, Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Carpenter, 

and he was admitted Dec. 17, 1706. being a widow, died, and Elizabeth, wife 
Denney surrendered at the same time of Robert Taylor, only daughter of John 
to Samuel Purcas, of Stowmarket, Brett, and next heir, was admitted to 
grocer, who was admitted. Barbours, Feb. 7, 17 17. Robert Taylor 

and Elizabeth his wife at same court 
sold to Samuel Purcas, then described 
as a beer brewer, who was admitted. 



156 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Samuel Purcas, Feb. 7, 17 17, surrendered all his tenements to use of himself 
and Ann his wife, and they were thereupon admitted. 

Samuel Purcas died before Nov. 23, 17 19, and Ann his wife married one 
Holmden, and on his death, she by will, Nov. 17, 1738 {? March 16, 1736), 
devised all her lands in Buxhall to her niece Sarah, wife of George Elliott, 
of Bury St. Edmunds, brasier, for life, and afterwards to be sold by her 
executors. Sarah was admitted April 14, 1744, and with the concurrence of the 
parties entitled to the proceeds of sale, by deed August 14 and 15, 1770, sold 
to James Purr, of Buxhall, blacksmith, who was admitted August 16, 1770 ; and 
he at the same court surrendered to use of himself for life, and then of Eleanor, 
his wife, for life, with remainder to his own heirs ; and James Purr and his wife 
were admitted at the same court. James Purr July 26, 1799, sold to William 
Spink, of Buxhall, Wheelwright, who was admitted Sept. 20, 1800. William 
Spink, by will Feb. 28, 1836, devised to his son, John Spink, all that messuage 
or tenement, farm lands, hereditaments, and premises with the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging, situate in Buxhall, then in his own occupation (subject to 
his wife living in the parlour and parlour-chamber of the same messuage rent 
free during her life), and the son John Spink was admitted Dec. 14, 1842. 
He by deed Oct. 12, 1843, mortgaged to William Kemball the elder, and sur- 
rendered Feb. 15, 1849, to such uses as Kemball the elder might appoint. John 
Spink then by deed, June 13, 1846, made an assignment to trustees for the 
benefit of his creditors, under which the trustees sold to William Kemball the 
elder, and by deed of same date the property also was appointed by William 
Kemball the elder, with the concurrence of the trustees to the use of William 
Kemball the younger, free from any redemption by the trustees for creditors or 
John Spink, but upon trust for William Kemball the elder, and William Kemball 
the younger, was accordingly admitted April 30, 1847. William Kemball the 
younger, who died Jan. 25, 1872, having by his will Dec. 3, 1859, devised all 
his trust and mortgaged estates to his wife Mary Ann Kemball, she was admitted 
July 9, 1872. She died Nov. 23, 1890, and after various devolutions of the 
equitable interest Mr. George Gudgeon, of Stowmarket, was on May 10, 
1900, duly admitted tenant, subject to all trusts and equities affecting the 
premises. 

In a Court held 5 Eliz. July 15, a reference is made to the heriot as being 
one of the best animals, as appears from the Court Rolls, 21 Rich. II. 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 157 

(5) Smyths. 

A tenement called Smyths late Bradstrete, customary and heriotable, lying in 
Brettenham Street in Buxhall. 

This tenement belonged to John Bradstreete in the time of Elizabeth, and 
Oct. 17, 35 Eliz., he surrendered to John Baker, who, Oct. lo, 3 Jac, sold to 
Henry Osborne conditionally " at apportioned rent of ij'* iiij'' part of the rent of 
iiij' iiij"* anciently payable out of this and other premises called Smythes, sometime 
since surrendered to John Pilbarowe," and Osborne was admitted Jan. 10, 3 Jac. I., 
and absolutely Sept. 30, 4 Jac. I. Henry Osborne sold Sept. 30, 5 Jac. I., to 
Henry Wood, who. May 11, 1 6 1 1 , sold to John Pilbarowe, who surrendered 
Oct. II, 1 6 16, to his son William Pilbarowe and Elizabeth Atlcyn, whom the 
son was about to marry. They were admitted same time, the rent being 
apportioned, William to pay ij^ part of the rent of ij^ iiij'' and John, the father, 
to pay iiij''. At the same court William and Elizabeth surrendered to use of 
Edmund OfFwood and Margaret his wife, for their lives and to the heirs of Edmund, 
and at the same time they were admitted, and March 30, 3 Car. I. (1627) 
surrendered to use of themselves for life, remainder to Anne Lanman for life, 
remainder to William Landman (sic) for life, remainder to Judith Warreyn, wife 
of Ralph Warreyn of Brettenham in fee. Anne Lanman was admitted March 28, 
1649, and Judith, April 16, 1655, with her husband surrendered the reversion 
expectant on the death of Anne Lanman to William Lanman and Elizabeth his 
wife, and the heirs of the said William, and William and Elizabeth were admitted 
April 24, 1660. WilHam Lanman by will Feb. 24, 1661, left all to his 
wife Elizabeth, and she was on his death admitted April 20, 1663, and Nov. 
3, 1 67 1, surrendered to Edmund Lanman, her son, who was admitted same day. 
Edmund Lanman, alias Offord, sen., Nov. 13, 1719, surrendered to Edmund 
Lanman, alias OfFord, jun., of Stowupland, yeoman, who by will Feb. 3, 
1 76 1, devised all his estates to Edmund Offord his eldest son, who was admitted 
Oct. 22, 1764. Another Edmund Lanman, eldest son of the last, was admitted 
May 30, 1766, on the death of his father, and by the name Edmund Orford 
Dec. 7, 1769, sold to Sarah Fuller, of Buxhall, spinster, who was admitted 
Aug. 16, 1770. On Sarah's death her eldest brother and heir, John Fuller, of 
Melford, draper, was Jan. 11, 1780, admitted, and on his death his only son 
and heir, John Fuller, was admitted August 21, 1788. He died, and his son John 
Fuller, being then 18 years of age, was admitted Mav 27, 1806; and on June 21, 



158 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1 8 16, sold to Thomas Dykes, jun., of Buxhall, husbandman, who was admitted 
July 7, 1 8 17. By his will Jan. 6, 1843, he appointed Frederic Rands Melton 
and Isaac Clover executors, and authorised them to sell all his copyhold property, 
cottages, hereditaments, and premises in Buxhall in the occupation of Thomas 
and William Dykes, William Williams, and John Welham. He died May i, 1849, 
and his executors sold to Thomas Dykes, of Buxhall, yeoman, the son of the 
deceased, who was admitted Feb. 8, 1850. The cottages referred to in the 
will were more than those included in the last sale. On the death of Thomas 
Dykes, the son, his eldest son and heir, Robert Dykes, was admitted May 2, 1865, 
and he, Jan. 2, 1866, sold to George John Septimus Gage, of Buxhall, butcher, 
who was admitted July 2, 1867. Gage died, and John Euston, of Buxhall, 
labourer, having from Dec. 22, 1881, been in undisputed and uninterrupted 
possession without any claim and without any admission of the right of the said 
Gage was on September 19, 1899, admitted. 



(6) Hawes or Hawds 

One messuage and garden annexed on the north called Hawes, with four acres 
and half of land and pasture bond and heriotable to the same messuage, belonging 
with the appurtenances lying in Buxhall [2 Eliz. in two pieces together adjoining 
namely] between the lands of the Manor of Buxhall called Smythes on the one 
side, and lands of the Manor of Leffey called Little Croft on the other side, one 
headland thereof abutting on the lane called Spetilman's Strete, and another 
headland abutting upon land of the said Manor of Leffey called Backhowsfeld. And 
also a piece of land adjoining the said messuage and occupied with the same 
containing three perches in length and one and a half perches in breadth. 

Walter Copinger, the lord of the Manor, granted the above June 5, 13 
Hen. VIII., to Henry Muskett, and at a court held April 16, 2 Eliz., it was found 
that a certain William Bradstrete in his lifetime, without copy and without legal 
title, had for many years enjoyed and occupied the premises. John Bradstret was 
his son and heir, but the property passed to him and Roger Bradstret, Joan Marten, 
and Ann Bradstret, the sons and daughters of the said William, who were admitted 
April 16, 2 Eliz. At the court at which they were admitted it seems that Sir 
Clement Heigham, Sir Ambrose Jermyn, Knights, and John Holt, gent., were 
present as a kind of jury, and the lord " sitting in Court called before him 
John Bradstrete, son and heir of the aforesaid William, and questioned him by 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 159 

what colour force authority or power he and the others held and occupied the 
land and tenements aforesaid, and he alleged none otherwise but that a certain 
Walter Coppinger gentlemen who had an estate of and in the manor of Buxhall 
with the appurtenances for term of his life by a certain his charter shown in 
Court," namely one of June 5, 13 Hen. VIII., enfeoffing Henry Muskett, "which 
same estate is void in law and of no value for that the said Walter had nothing 
of and in the aforesaid manor with the appurtenances whereof the aforesaid messuage 
garden and iiij acres and a half of land are parcel except an estate for term of his 
life therefore the lord after examination of the matter aforesaid and the truth of 
thing known as well at the special desire and request of the aforesaid Sir Ambrose 
Jermyn, Knight, and John Holt as for conscience sake, granted out of his hands 
to the aforesaid. John Bradstrete Roger Bradstrete Joan Marten and Ann Bradstrete 
sons and daughters of the aforesaid William and his heirs the aforesaid messuage 
garden four acres and a half of land aforesaid with the appurtenances to whom 
seisin was thereof delivered to hold to them their heirs and assigns by the rod at 
the will of the lord according to the custom of this manor by the service of iiij'* 
rent yearly and suit of Court. And the lord at the instance of the aforesaid John 
Holt gave the fine for this grant only &c." Ann Bradstrete died before Sept. 
12, 17 Eliz., and June i, 22 Eliz. (1580), John Bradstrete and Salpidus Parkard 
and Joan his wife, surrendered the premises to William Syer, who was admitted at 
the same time. He sold to Agnes Baker, widow, who was admitted July 16, 
24 Eliz., and at the same court surrendered to the use of herself for life with 
remainder to her son John and his heirs. John Baker, after the death of his 
mother, sold to John Pilbarowe who was admitted Jan. 10, Jac. I., and on Oct. i, 
15 Jac. I., 1 617, surrendered to the use of his son John Pilbarowe. Both father 
and son joined in a sale to Robert Houghton, who was admitted May 26, 1630. 
Robert Houghton died 13 Car. II., and Charles Houghton, his son and heir, was 
admitted April 20, 1663. Charles Houghton, May 12, 1686, mortgaged to Samuel 
Veidon, of Furnival's Inn, and three proclamations were made, and no one coming to 
be admitted, a warrant was issued to the bailiff and the property seised for the lord, 
and at a court, Dec. 29, 17 14, the property was delivered out to the Rev. Thomas 
Hill, who, Sept. 9, 17 15, surrendered to William Powell, who was admitted 
same time. William Powell died and no one claimed, and after three proclama- 
tions this property was again seised by Charles Butler, the bailiff of the manor 
under warrant, August 13, 1 7 18 ; but at next Court, Oct. 7, 1718, Catherine 
Powell appeared, and the premises were granted to her. 



i6o History of the Parish of Buxhall 

(7) Payne's Croft and Benet's Meadow. 

Description. 1558. 

One croft called Paynes Croft, containing iv acres of land customary, being in 
Buxhall between land of the Manor of Buxhall and land of the Manor of Fen 
Hall on one part, and land of William Pylbarow on the other part, one head 
abutting on land of John Salter and another head abutting on land of the said 
William Pilbarow. And one piece of meadow called Benet's meadowe, containing 
one acre lying in Buxhall aforesaid between land of the manor of Fenhall on one 
part, one head abutting on land of the Manor of Buxhall called Payne's Croft, and 
another head abutting on land of the Manor of Fenhall. 

This property belonged in the reign of Henry VIII., to John Salter, he having 
been admitted September 30th in the sixteenth year of that king's reign. This John 
Salter was described as of the Fen alias of Badwell. John Salter and Joan were 
admitted April 8, 5 Edw. VI., and they sold to William Pylborowe Sept. 30, 
I Mary. William Pylbarow by will left the same to his wife Margaret for 
life, with remainder to his son, William Pylbarrow, and Margaret was admitted 
Sept. 30, 5 and 6 Phil, and Mary. 5 and 6 Eliz., Sept. 30th, William surrendered 
to use of himself for life, and then to use of Maritie, and then to use of his son 
William. William died, probably in his father's lifetime, leaving a son John, an 
infant. On attaining 21, John Pilbarowe was admitted June 1, 22 Eliz., 1580 (or 
April 13, 22 Eliz., as stated in Rolls, Sept. 28, 23 Eliz.). John Pilbarowe, by will, 
Nov. 12, 22 Eliz., devised to Alice Grymsey, his mother, who had married Robert 
Grymsey, for life, with remainder to his (John's) brother William and his heirs. Alice 
was admitted Sept. 23, 23 Eliz., and William, the brother, Dec. 7, 30 Eliz., and 
at the same court surrendered his remainder to John Goldesmythe, gent., and John 
Mayhew, who were then admitted. John Goldesmythe died before Aug. 31, 33 Eliz., 
and at a court this day John Mayhew surrendered the remainder to Thomas Allen, 
gent., who was thereupon admitted. Thomas Allen, Sept. 30, 4 Jac. I., sold to John 
Shribb, who was admitted same day. John Shribb died, and was succeeded by his 
brother Robert, who was admitted Mar. 29, 9 Jac. I. Robert Shribb left the 
premises to his wife Jane for life, with remainder to John Shribb. Jane, Robert's 
widow, married one Goodwyn, and died before Oct. 6, 7 Car. I., and John, Oct. 6, 
7 Car. I., sold to Dorothy Draper, spinster, who was admitted August 20, 8 Car. I. 
Dorothy married one William Bugbe, and then sold to William Frost Nov, 18, 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings i6i 

15 Car. I., who was admitted same day. William Frost was succeeded by his son 
George, who was admitted May i, 1657, and Oct. 6, 1663, sold to John Goddard, 
who was admitted April 5, 1670. Ann Goddard, who held, died, and John Goddard, 
her son and heir, was admitted Feb. 29, 1738. He, by will, Sept. 30, 1761, devised 
to his son, John Goddard, who was admitted Sept. 9, 1762. The last-named John 
Goddard, described as John Goddard the elder, of Hunston, yeoman, and his son, 
John Goddard the younger, suffered a recovery and sold to Mary Maltyward, who 
was admitted March 26, 1779. Mary Maltyward, by her will, Feb. 14, 1797, 
devised the above premises to her great-niece, Elizabeth Sparke Edgar, the only 
daughter of her late nephew, Thomas Edgar, under the description of " all that my 
messuage or tenement farm lands hereditaments and premises situate lying and 
being in Buxhall aforesaid and now in the tenure or occupation of myself and of 
Joseph Edwards and heretofore purchased by me or my late brother Robert Maltyward 
gentleman deceased of the family of Goddard," and Elizabeth Sparke Edgar was 
admitted Sept. 20, 1800. She married one Garnham, and by will, April 13, 1832, 
directed that "all the messuage or tenement and cottages with the yards gardens pieces 
and parcels of land with the appurtenances thereto belonging formerly Goddards then 
in the occupation of John Green the younger and abutting up to and adjoining her 

Mansion House and the messuage or Cottage being in the occupation of 

should within one month after her decease be offered for sale to the Reverend 
Maltyward Simpson by valuation, and if he declined to purchase she devised same 
to her husband, John Garnham." Simpson seems not to have availed himself of the 
option, for John Garnham was admitted Oct. 16, 1835. John Garnham, by will, 
June 10, 1870, devised all his property therein called his settled estates to the use 
of Basil Brooke Garnham, a son of his late deceased nephew, Richard Enoch 
Garnham, for life, with remainder to Gerald Richard Garnham for life, and after his 
decease to the use of the first and other sons of the said Basil Brooke Garnham in 
tail male, with a remainder to the first and other sons of the said G. R. Garnham 
in tail male, with remainder to the use of Richard William Garnham, son 
of his cousin, William Henry Garnham, his heirs and assigns. Basil Brooke 
Garnham was admitted for hfe Jan. 12, 1874, and on his death, April 17, 
1887, without issue; the said Gerald Richard Garnham was admitted Dec 18, 
1 89 1 ; and on his death, Jan. 19, 1894, without issue, Richard William 
Garnham, of 273 Milkwood Road, Heme Hill, surgeon, was admitted Sept. 19, 
1899. 



1 62 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

(8) Small Hobbes. 

In Finborough. Descriptions, t^'t^ Eliz. 

One messuage newly built, and one garden, one orchard, and two pieces of 
land, customary and heriotable, containing eight acres anticiently called Small Hobbes, 
lying in Great Finborough, in a certain close called Copingers field. 

13 Car. II. 

A close, customary and heriotable, lying in Great Finborough, in tenure of John 
Blye, appurtenant to a messuage or tenement lately built by the said John Blye, 
containing three acres, abutting on land adjoining the aforesaid messuage towards the 
east side, and on the lane leading from High Street Green to Battisford Tye towards 
the west, and on customary land of John Blomefeild towards the north, and on free 
land of the said John Blomefeild towards the south. 

Description, 1749. 

All that messuage or tenement with the Barn yard and two pieces of land thereto 
belonging and adjoining, situate in Great Finborough between the lane leading from 
High Street Green to Battisford Tye north-west and the lane leading from Finborough 
Green to Battisford Tye south-east, abutting on the land of William Wollaston, Esq., 
on all other parts containing together by estimation eight acres, lately in the occupation 
of Edmund Taylor and then in the several occupations of Isaac Taylor and William 
Purr [later of George Chaplin and John Powles], with the appurtenances. 

Thomas Lanman had the above property in the time of Henry VIII., and was 
admitted May 30, 35 Hen. VIII., and by his will, Feb. 26, 31 Eliz., he gave his 
copyhold messuage, " wheryn I nowe dwell," to his wife, Bytherisse Lanman, for 
life, with remainder to his son Henry. 

Henry Lanman, by will, April 6, 1598, devised it to Agnes, his wife, for life, 
and after her death to his executors to sell. Agnes afterwards married Robert Brooke, 
and by her will, Jan. 16, 1635, appointed George Gardiner, of Floton, yeoman, 
executor; and he by deed, Oct. 30, 13 Car. I., sold to Thomas Lanman, who was 
the eldest son and heir of the above named Henry, and he was admitted April 5, 
1638. Thomas, Nov. 6, 1644, sold to Elizabeth P>ench, who was admitted April 
14, 1645; ^"<i O''' her death George French, her eldest brother and heir, was 
admitted April 18, 1652 (? Feb. 20, 1651). George French surrendered to John 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 163 

Blye, who was admitted April 26, i Car. II. (1661), and, Nov. 13, 1665, surrendered 
to his own use and that of his wife Anne for lives, with remainder to the use 
of his own heirs; and John Blye was admitted April 8, 1670, and by will, Oct. 
19, 1675, devised same to Anne Wright, his grandchild, one of the daughters of 
William Wright, of Nedging, yeoman, his son-in-law, and she was admitted 
April 10, 1676. 

Probably John Edgar took on the surrender of one Elizabeth Porter, spinster, 
July 21, 1749, but in any case the above premises were surrendered by John 
Edgar Nov. 11, 1749, to his daughter, Mary Edgar, for life, with remainder to 
John Edgar. Mary Edgar married one Rust and died. John Edgar also died, 
leaving John Edgar Rust, of Stowmarket, merchant, his grandson and heir, and he 
was admitted April 30, 1803. He sold, Sept. 26, 1805, to William Hatten, who 
was admitted July 23, 18 13, and by will devised to his son, Charles Hatten, "all 
those two copyhold cottages then used as three tenements in Great Finborough in the 
occupation of Thomas Pegg, George Whiting and Isaac Lock, and two pieces of 
copyhold land adjoining containing together about seven acres which he purchased of 
Mr. VVm. Cross." This description does not tally very well, but Charles Hatten 
was admitted to the above by the description in 1 749, with the addition, " which 
said messuage is now divided into two tenements in the occupation of George 
Whiting and Isaac Lock, and which said Barn is now converted into another 
tenement and in the occupation of Thomas Pegg, and which said pieces of land 
are now laid into two freehold pieces of land lately also belonging to the said 
William Hatten," who was admitted Sept. 8, 1836. Charles Hatten, by will, 
Nov. 24, 1863, gave and devised "all that his messuage or tenement and farm 
known as the ' Boarded Barn Farm ' with the cottages, lands, and hereditaments 
thereto belonging, part freehold and part copyhold, containing 149 acres or thereabouts, 
with the appurtenances situate in Great Finborough or in some adjacent parish, and 
then in the occupation of Joseph John Hatten, unto his son Charles William Hatten," 
who was admitted January 6, 1865. 

(9) Land near Mill Green. 

A piece of land parcel of the waste of this Manor, lying upon or near a 
certain green called Mill Green in Buxhall aforesaid, as the same abutteth upon the 
lands of the lord of this Manor on the part of the south, upon the lands of John 
Diaper on the part of the west, upon the King's Highway then leading from 



164 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Rattlesden to Buxhall aforesaid on the part of the north, and upon the waste land 
of this Manor on the part of the east, and containeth in length from east to west 
117 feet, from north to south at the west end thereof 36 feet, and at the east end 
thereof 29 feet by the Rule, to hold with its appurtenances unto William Willden 
his executors, administrators, and assigns from henceforth for and during the full 
term of 999 years by fealty, suit of court, and the annual rent of 5s. 

Granted by lord of manor with consent of homage, May 19, 1777, to William 
Wilden, of Buxhall, carpenter. 

ENFRANCHISED. 

(10) Smiths. 

A tenement and seven acres of land and pasture, customary and heriotable, anciently 
called Smyths formerly Bradstreets, lying in Buxhall between lands late of Robt. 
Brown and a tenement called Hawes. 

Description, 9 Jac. I. 

One tenement anciently called Smythes and late Bradstrete, with an orchard seven 
acres, stables, and outbuildings thereto belonging, bond and heriotable, with all their 
appurtenances lying in Buxhall [i Eliz., formerly of Robert Tylle between land of John 
Woode and a tenement of William Bradstret] [2 Ehz., between land of John at Wood on 
the one part and the tenement called Hawes on the other part], one head abutting 
on land of the Manor of Cockerells on the part of the north, and the other head on 
the south abutting on the Highway called Brettenham Street. Yearly rent v' and 
parcel of a rent of vij^ iiij'' for the premises and other land called Smythes and 
apportioned with the assent of the lord and tenant. 

William Bradstret was the owner in the time of Henry VIII., and April 7, 
2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, surrendered to his son Robert, who was admitted 
same date. Robert surrendered Sept. 30, 2 Eliz., to Edward, who died before 
Oct. I, 15 Eliz. By his will, Sept. 3, 15 Eliz., he provided that Margaret, his 
widow, should occupy all his tenements and lands in Buxhall until Thomasyn, his 
daughter, should attain 21, and If his wife died before Thomasyn attained 21, then 
that his brother, John Bradstret, should enjoy till that period. Margaret was 
admitted October, 15 Eliz. Thomasyn seems to have married one Stevynson, and 
died before Oct. 12, 28 Eliz., as on this date John Bradstret was admitted as her 
heir. John Bradstret sold to John Baker Oct. 17, 35 Eliz., and he sold the 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 165 

premises, together with Hawes, to John Pilbarowe, who was admitted Jan. 10, 
3 Jac. I. John Pilbarowe, by his will, Sept. 19, 13 Car. I., left this property to 
his wife Anne during widowhood, with remainder to his son Richard. They were 
both admitted Oct. 7, 1639. On the death of his mother, Richard was admitted 
Oct. 9, 15 Car., and sold to Thomas Stearne Oct. 7, 1648, who was admitted 
May 16, 1649. Stearne mortgaged the property once or twice, and one mortgage 
was made June 16, 1671, to Judith Cole, daughter of John Cole, of Gt. Finborough, 
yeoman, who was admitted Nov. 3, 1671. She married one Edward Lever, and they 
together surrendered, May 16, 1707, to Catherine Byles, of Buxhall, widow, who was 
admitted April 6, 1708. She, by her will. May 24, 1717, devised the property, 
then in the occupation of John Salter, to her daughter Deborah, wife of James 
Durrant, and James Durrant and his wife were admitted June 21, 1723, and surrendered 
same day to use of Deborah for life, with remainder to her son, James Durrant, 
and his heirs, who were same day duly admitted accordingly. James, by his will, 
Sept. 16, 1745, devised the property to his wife Mary absolutely, who was admitted 
July 26, 1746. Mary Durrant, in contemplation of marriage, August i, 1748, 
surrendered to such uses (in case her marriage with Daniel Shirrell, of Baytham, 
yeoman, was effected), as she might appoint, and in default to herself, her heirs and 
assigns. Mary Shirrell, by will, August 22, 1787, devised to Mary, wife of Michael 
Simpson the elder, of Baytham, her tenement then in the occupation of Mr. Anthony 
Fuller, for life, with remainder to James, son of Michael Simpson the elder, "as and 
for his own proper use and at his own disposal." Mary Simpson was admitted for 
life August 21, 1788, and at the same court James Simpson was admitted to the 
remainder. His mother having died, James Simpson, Sept. 20, 1800, sold to Charles 
Oxer, of Buxhall, farmer, who was admitted same day. Charles Oxer, by his will, 
June 18, 1824, devised to his reputed son, John Bradbrook Oxer, of Shelland, 
farmer, all his copyhold tenements in Buxhall, then in the occupation of himself 
and others; and John Bradbrook Oxer was admitted March 21, 1825. He, by will, 
March 15, 1832, directed Elizabeth Oxer, Charles Oxer, and Jeremiah Oxer to sell 
all his lands in Buxhall, and by deed, April 9, 1838, they did so to James 
Bradbrooke, who was admitted April 10, 1838. James Bradbrooke, by will, April 25, 
1838, devised to Isaac Clover, of Buxhall, miller, his messuage and lands in Buxhall 
upon trust to pay the rents to his wife Esther, or let her occupy during life she 
paying interest on a mortgage, and then upon trust to sell. Isaac Clover was 
admitted Feb. 15, 1859, the property being then described as "all that messuage 
lately divided into two tenements and then in the respective occupations of the said 



1 66 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Esther Bradbrooke and another, together with seven acres of land." "And also 
all those four messuages, tenements, or cottages afterwards erected by the said James 
Bradbrooke on part of the said land." James Bradbrooke had in his lifetime 
conditionally surrendered to Helen Mary Ann Green for securing ;/;400, and the benefit 
of this conditional surrender was by indenture, Nov. i, 1862, assigned by the 
said H. jM. A. Green to James Mill Walker, of Copdock, and Joseph Bowstead, 
of the Inner Temple, barrister-at-law. Bowstead died, and James Mill Walker was 
admitted April 28, 1887, and he enfranchised this property Nov. 7, 1887. 

(11) WOODFIELD. 

A piece of land and pasture, customary and heriotable, called Woodfield, containing 
six acres lying in Buxhall, abutting on Buxhall Wood and two pieces of pasture, 
customary and heriotable, containing two acres lying in Buxhall between lands some- 
time of John Digby late of Sir Roger North and land late of William Smyth alias 
Sellores and land of divers persons on other parts ; one head abutting on land 
called little Woodfeild and the other on the brooke. And one piece of land, 
customary and heriotable, containing two acres lying in Buxhall between land late of 
John Digby and land of divers others, one head abutting on land called [little] 
Woodfield and the other on the Brook. [1823. Added description "which said 
pieces of land contain in the whole nine acres heretofore in the occupation of — 
Cooper, since of Thomas Edgar, late of William Jackson, and since of Edmund 
Edgar."] 

Henry Murton received a grant April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary. It was of 
six acres called Woodfield and four acres of land in divers pieces, at rent of lis. 4d., 
and the fine was then fixed for all time at xiiij^ 

Richard Sear and Agnes, his wife, surrendered April, 12 Eliz., to Richard 
Reynold, who, March 27, 19 Eliz., surrendered to Robert Fynche, who was then 
admitted. Robert surrendered April 14, 26 Eliz., to Henry Gilbert, Esq., of 
London, goldsmith, who settled at Great Finborough (having received a grant of it 
from Queen Elizabeth) and married Elizabeth, daughter of John Howe, of Stowmarket. 
From Henry it passed to his son, Sir John Gilbert, of Finborough Hall, who was 
buried in the church there by the side of his father. Sir John married twice, first 
Dorothy, daughter of Robert Gosnold, of Otley, and second Elizabeth, daughter of 
Sir Arther Heveningham, of Heveningham, and left three daughters only — Dorothy, 
who married first Sir William Forth, of Butley Abbey, and secondly Gresham Parkin, 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings 167 

of Aldham, from whom the Parkins of Aldham are descended ; Elizabeth, who married 
Sir Roger North, son of Sir Henry North, Knt., who took the Finborough property; 
and Ursula, who married Sir John Foley, of Colombyne Hall. Proclamation, 
Dec. 13, 1616, that Roger North, son of Sir Henry, had not come to be 
admitted. 

Henry North, the eldest son and heir of Sir Roger North, surrendered 
April 24, 1660, to William Woolaston, of Shenton, Leicestershire, who was then 
admitted, and on his death his son, William Woolaston, was admitted April 5, 
1670. 

Sept. 26, 1 701, Sir John Chester, Bart., and Anna, his wife, John Wilkins 
and Rebecca, his wife, surrendered to William Woolaston, of Charterhouse Yard, 
in the County of Middlesex, clerk, who was admitted Nov. 14, 1701. William 
Wollaston, by his will, July 8, 17 14, devised to his eldest son, Charlton Wollaston, 
" all those copyhold estates in the County of Suffolk which I purchased of the Lady 
Chester and Mrs. Wilkins and their husbands." Charlton Wollaston was admitted 
Dec. 14, 1724, and on his death his brother, William Wollaston, his next heir, 
was admitted Oct. 13, 1729. William Wollaston died, and his son, William 
Wollaston, was admitted May 26, 1758. The son, William Wollaston, June 3, 
1795, surrendered to William Hatten the younger, of Beccles, merchant, who was 
admitted Oct. 3, 1795, and at the same time acknowledged that he was a free 
tenant of certain other premises. William Hatten, April 3, 1797, sold to Edmund 
Edgar, ot Gt. Finborough, farmer, who was admitted June 10, 1797. He, Dec. <^, 
1822, sold to Bayley Webb, who, by will, March 20, 1865, appointed his wife, Mary 
Webb, her brother, Thomas Carter, and Lankester Webb, executors and trustees, and 
authorised them to sell his copyholds. Bayley Webb died Dec. i, 1866, and the 
trustees sold, by deed, April 6, 1867, to William Woods, of Aldeburgh, miller, 
who was admitted May 30, 1867. 

William Woods, by will, June 11, 1870, appointed Robert Turner, Alfred 
Kent, and John Borrett executors, and devised to them all his estates upon trust 
to sell. By a codicil, May 25, 1874, reciting that Alfred Kent had died, he 
appointed Anthony Hurren in his place, and died May 26, 1874. The trustees sold 
fo'" ;£i'740> by deed, Oct. 23, 1874, and the above property was surrendered to 
J. W. Rouse in trust for the Rev. Henry Hill, the purchaser, then lord of the 
Manor, and Mr. Rouse was admitted Oct. 30, 1874, and this property, with 
other, was enfranchised by deed Nov. 4, 1874. 

This is now known as Stone Farm, or at least is part of such farm. 



1 68 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

(12) FUNDLINGS OR BaRONS AT THE NORTHERLY END OF BaRONS LaNE. 

One piece of land called Barrowes [32 Eliz., Barronhis] land alias Barber's Parcel, 
containing two acres sometime parcel of a tenement called Fanshings [or Fundlyngs, 
or, 32 Eliz., Faudlings], lying between free land of Robert late Christiane Crosse 
wid., called Howletts towards the north-east and land of the said Robert towards 
the south-west, one head abutting on a Croft of the said Robert late Cristiane's 
towards the south-east [? west], and the other head abutting on a croft late of the 
said Christiane called Little Fewks [4 Edw. IV., Litil Fowkys] Meadow towards 
the north and west [.'' east]. 

And one piece of meadow containing half an acre as it is enclosed with trees 
lying next Little. Fowks Meadow in part towards the north-east, and pasture or 
meadow of the Manor of LefFey towards the south-west, one head abutting on land 
of the said Christine late Thurnwoods [4 Edw. VI., Thurmods], towards the south-east 
and land of the Manor of LefFey towards the north-west, with a way for a cart to 
go and pass from the said piece called Barbers. 

And also one piece of meadow lying next the Grindell or Water Course in 
part towards the north and west and the said land called Howletts towards the south 
and east, one head abutting on pasture of the said Robert late said Cristiane towards 
the north and east. 

Granted by lord out of hand Sept. 30, 4 Edw. VI., to Robert Rydnal. Robert 
Rydnall surrendered Jan. 14, 32 Eliz., to use of himself and wife Christiane for life, 
remainder to Robert Rydnall, jun., his son, April 20, 43 Eliz. Christiane Rydnall, 
widow of Robert Rydnall, on his death, claimed for life, remainder to Robert Rydnall, 
jun., and it was found by the homage that the said land was not anciently customary 
land of the Manor demised or demisable by copy Court Roll at the will of the lord, 
according to the custom of the Manor from time immemorial, and consequently the grant 
to Robert Rydnall was bad. The grant was, however, confirmed. Robert Rydnall, jun., 
by will, Nov. 7, 1631, gave his copyholds lying in three pieces — two held of Buxhall 
and one of the Manor of Cockerells — to John Rydnall, son of Robert Rydnall, of 
Mendlesham, yeoman. John Rydnall was admitted April 20, 1632, and surrendered 
June 27, 1643, to Robert Ridnall, who was admitted April 12, 1644, and surrendered 
Jan. I, 1650, all the above to Thomasyne Copinger, one of the daughters of 
William Copinger, Esq., deceased, who was admitted April 18, 1652. 

Thomasyne sold all her copyhold lands to Henry Copinger, the lord of the 
Manor, but did not surrender, and, in fact, there is no further entry on the Rolls ; 



Copyholders of Buxhall Manor and their Holdings i6g 

but she executed a bond dated Oct. i, 1662, to make such assurance of the 
purchased property as Henry Coplnger might direct. The land was subsequently 
sold, for it forms no part at present of the Buxhall Estate. 

(13) Pye Hatch Farm. 

A tenement and four pieces of land, meadow and pasture, bond and heriotable, 
called Pyes Hatches, containing eight acres lying in Buxhall between Wood of the 
Manor called Pyes Wood and the Highway called Pyes Street, one head abutting on 
land of the Manor of Stanstead called Wards and Stebbings [Stebins, 1619 ; i Eliz., 
Stubbings], and the other on a wood of the Manor of Stanstead called Overwood. 
Rent iiij^ 

Anna Kynge, of Brettenham, was admitted to this property Sept. 30, i Eliz., 
1559, and Oct. 12, 28 Eliz., she surrendered to her son, Richard Kynge, who was 
admitted same day. Richard surrendered conditionally to Henry Kemball Jan. 14, 
38 Eliz., and he was admitted same day. Nov. 4, 43 Eliz., Henry Kembold 
surrendered conditionally to his son, Richard Kembold, who was admitted Jan. 14, 
44 Eliz. He, Oct. 2, 3 Jac. I., surrendered to his brother, Henry Kenibould, who 
was admitted same day. Henry sold to John Robinson June i, 161 9, who was 
admitted this day. John Robinson sold to John Greenwood Nov. 4, 1635, and he 
was admitted April 30, 1636. On Oct. 6, 23 Car. II., John Greenwood surrendered 
to the use of himself for life, with remainder to William Greenwood, his son, and 
Mary, his son's wife, who were admitted Nov. 3, 1671. After the decease of these 
three the property was to go to the heirs of the body of William and Mary. 
William was the only issue, and he was admitted August 23, 17 17. He sold to 
John Barnes, who was admitted April 27, 1726, and on his death his only son and 
heir, John Barnes, was admitted May 30, 1768. He died, and his only son and 
heir, John Barnes, was admitted June 14, 1792. He, by his will, Oct. 15, 1829, 
devised to his eldest son and heir, John Barnes, all his messuage or tenement in 
Buxhall wherein he then dwelt, with the land, containing eight acres, and John Barnes, 
the son, was admitted July 24, 1835. On the death of John Barnes, his only child 
and heiress, Martha Ann Barnes, was admitted April 30, 1847. She married Robert 
Pettite, and died at Buxhall Jan. 19, 1895, having by her will. May 28, 1868, 
devised to her husband all her real estate, and he was admitted Feb. i, 1900. 

This piece of land has since been enfranchised. 

23 



CHAPTER VI 
The three other Manors in Buxhall 

(a) The Manor of Cockerells Hall 

BEFORE the Norman Conquest this Manor belonged to Ingelric, the priest who 
enjoyed not only the favour of Edward the Confessor, but also of William 
the Conqueror. He was Dean of St. Martin's-le-Grand, a house of secular 
canons, and a man of some note in his day. Shortly after the Conquest and 
before the Domesday survey. Count Eustace, who singularly had also Saxon as well 
as Norman claims, for his first wife whom he married in 1050 was Goda, the only 
daughter of King Ethelred II., by Emma of Normandy and sister by the father's 
side of Edward the Confessor, managed to secure all the lands of Ingelric, and the 
Cockerel Is Hall Estate went to make up the great fief known, at a later date, as 
" The Honor of Boulogne." 

Count Eustace of Boulogne had two sons by Ida, daughter of Duke Geoffrey 
the Bearded, of Bouillon, whom he married in 1057 — Eustace, Count of Boulogne, 
and Godfrey de Bouillon, the celebrated Crusader leader and ultimately elected King of 
Jerusalem. 

In 1066 Count Eustace (the second of the name) was one of the French nobles 
who joined the army of the Conqueror and of whose presence at the Battle of 
Hastings there can be no doubt. He was rewarded by extensive grants of land, but 
these were all speedily forfeited on his attempt in 1067, during the absence King of 
William in Normandy, to seize Dover Castle at the instigation of the disaffected 
men of Kent. The attempt failed and the besiegers were forced to retreat. A 
panic ensuing many of his followers were slain, and Eustace contrived to escape to 
his own country. On the King's return in 1068 the Count was outlawed and his 
honours and lands in this country forfeited. It is not known by what means he 
regained the favour of the King, but probably his power and influence was so 
considerable in Normandy that the King found it politic to overlook his offence and 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 171 

treason. Though many manors were restored to him on his reconciliation with the 
King they cannot be distinguished from those acquired later or even from those 
acquired by his son Eustace the third Count, who is the tenant on Domesday Survey. 
Eustace the second Count probably died in 1080, as his second wife Ida is described 
as a widow in 108 1. The Cockerells Hall Estate, passed from Eustace the third 
Count, who married Mary, daughter of King Malcolm of Scotland, to his only 
daughter Matilda, Countess of Boulogne, who was married to Stephen, King of 
England, and died in 11 52.1 Their two sons, Eustace and William, died without 
issue, and on the death of King Stephen the property passed to his daughter Maud, 
who was then Abbess of Romsey. The permission of the Pope was obtained, 
notwithstanding the strenuous opposition of Beclcet, and she was married to Mathew, 
a son of the Count of Flanders. Mr. Round, in his " Studies in Peerage and Family 
History," gives a vivid account of how the English estates of the Counts of 
Boulogne were, on this marriage, swept by Henry the Second "into the royal net," 
notwithstanding the efforts of Count Mathew and his descendants. The Cockerells Hall 
Estate no doubt practically passed into King Henry the Second's hands when Count 
William of Boulogne fell in the Toulouse campaign in 11 59 fighting in the King's 
service. 

The hall seems to have been erected in the time of the lion-hearted Richard, 
but no part of this is still standing. In those days it was the knightly abode of the 
Cockerells, who were lords of the manor for many generations and from whom, 
after passing through the hands of one or two others it passed to the Veseys and 
ultimately to the Copingers. There is little difficulty in perceiving how charming 
a residence the hall must have been in early days — for its site is peculiarly well 
chosen. The country around was thickly wooded and no doubt in feudal times oft 
echoed to the sound of bugle, mirth and song. The undulating land between Buxhall 
and the important centres of Bury and Ipswich was the favoured resorts of knights 
and ladies indulging in the sport of hawking and hunting, and the return from 
Stowmarket, or Thorney as it was then called, to Cockerells through Finborough 
and the long willow-covered meadows which fringe the Buxhall Estate, thence down 
Baron's Lane at the back of P'enn Hall must have been charming. All, however, is 
now changed. The living actor, be he mighty huntsman or redoubtable warrior, 

' On the death of Henry I., his nephew King Stephen was Count of Boulogne in right of his 
wife, and had the whole of the Boulogne fief. He also had the forfeited fief of Roger " de Poitou " 
(son of Earl Roger of Montgomeri) including the Honor of Lancaster — consequently there passed to 
him as part of Roger de Poitou's estate a further property in Buxhall, in fact, the Manor, 



172 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

lies peacefully at rest beneath the walls of the edifice in which he once worshipped, 
the closely wooded groves have disappeared — the hawk and the heron have passed 
away and the entire face of the country and habits of the people have changed. 
What was once forest in which the renowned champion of Cressy enjoyed free warren 
and lonely retreat is now represented by meadow and arable, and Cockerells Hall, 
though as late as 1724 the residence of the High Sheriff of the counties of Norfolk 
and Suffolk, shortly after that date degenerated to a farmhouse. The present owner 
has, however, endeavoured to restore the place to somewhat of its former dignity. 

The panelled rooms have had the paint and paper of generations removed, and 
have been restored to their former state, while various other improvements have been 
introduced without in any way interfering with the old work. Thus a court room 
has been added, 50 feet by 20 feet, mainly with the object of housing a part of the 
owner's library of some thirty odd thousand volumes, and at one end of the room, 
placed in a gallery of exquisitely carved oak is a three-manual organ of considerable 
power and beauty, while at the other end is a fine stained glass window rescued from 
an ancient chapel in Yorkshire pulled down some years ago. 

King Henry the Second appears to have granted the manor still as part of the 
Honor of Boulogne to the Cantelins, and in 10 Rich. I. we find Emma de Cantelin 
lady of the manor when it passed from her to Adam de Cokerell. He was 
succeeded by Sir William Cockerell, knt., and he, 9 Edw. I., by Robert Cockerell, 
his son and heir.i 

Sir Robert was succeeded by his son William, to whom the following entry 
from the Rolls of ParUament (vol. i. 479b) probably relates : — 

Ed. I and II. 

An're seignur le Rey prie Will' le fiz Sir Rob't Cokerel, qe come il esteit 
utlague tant come il esteit hors del pays a la sute mo Sire Rob't de Uffort, por son 
Park de Perham brisie en le Contie de Suff', e le dit mo Sire Robert pus enquerant 
de la chose, e sachant la verite q' le dit Will' n'en esteit de rien copable, relessa 
par ses Lettres Patentes, q'nqe en li fust. Par unt le dit Will' prie la g'ce le 
Rey, qe il li pardoint I'Utlaguerie avatditre, issi q' le dit Will' estoise a dreit en 
sa Court si nul hum'e voille sure ver li. E de ce voilie com'der sa Chartre. 

' 13 Edw. I. Demise of Sir Robert Cokerel and William his son, of land in Norfolk, which Sir 
Robert held by law of England on death of his wife, Juliana. Ancient Deed Public Record OfBce, 
A. 5487. 



J 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 173 

Cor' R. 

Rex ipsum acquietat de hiis que ad ipsum p'tiiient, dCi tamen ostendat L'ras 
acquietancie Dn'i Robert! de d'ca t'nsgr'. 

Robert Cockerel was the next lord, and there is amongst the Ancient Deeds in 
the Record Office (17 Edw. III. C 3184) a grant by Robert Cokerel, of Buxhall, 
to Adam, his son, and Cicely, Adam's wife, of all lands, &c., which the grantor 
acquired of Robert Cokerel of Ireland, in Buxhall, and of the homage and services 
of all his tenements in Rattlesden (Ratlisden) — 17 Edw. III. 

Adam Cokerell was the next lord, and he was succeeded in the reign of Richard 
II. by Robert Cockerell who, 17 Richard II., settled the Manor. 

The following is a copy of the settlement, which is dated 1394, and preserved 
amongst the Harleian charters (48 F. 55). 

Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Robertus Cokerell de Buxhale concessi dedi 
et hac present! carta mea confirmavi Magistro Johanni de Norton Clerico Johanni 
Spenser persone ecclesie de Drenkeston et Roberto de Aisshefeld Manerium meum 
in Buxhale et omnia terras et tenementa redditus et servicia mea cum omnibus suis 
pertinenciis in villis de Buxhale Ratlesden absque uUo retinemento habendani et 
tenendam dictum. Manerium et omnia terras et tenementa redditus et servicia cum 
omnibus eorum pertinenciis prefatis Johanni Johanni et Roberto de Aisshefeld 
heredibus et assignatis eorumdem de capitalibus dominis feodi per servicia inde 
debita et consueta Et ego predictus Robertus Cokerell et heredes mei dictum 
Manerium Et omnia terras et tenementa redditus et servicia predicta cum quibuscum- 
que eorum pertinenciis prefatio Johanni Johanni et Roberto de Aisshefeld heredibus 
et assignatis eorumdem contra omnes gentes Warantizabimus imperpetuum. In cuius 
rei testimonium presenti carte sigillum meum apposui. Hiis testibus — Roberto Capel 
Roberto de Neketon Roberto Aldwick Roberto filio Roberti Capel Johanne de Halle 
Roberto Hervy et aliis. Datum apud Buxhale die Martis proxima post festum. 
Exaltacionis sancte Crucis Anno regni Regis Ricardi secundi post conquestum 
septimodecimo [1394]. 

Seal perfect. A device — a capital W within circle. [Endorsed in a later 
(^though old) /mndl Carta Roberti Cokerel de Ratelysden. 

The next lord we have any certainty of is John Cockerell, the son of Robert 
Cockerell, but whether son or grandson of the Robert Cockerell who settled 
the Manor it is impossible to determine. From the date, the latter is more probable. 
Not unlikely the Robert who settled the Manor had two sons, John and Robert, and 
the Manor passed first to Sir John Cockerell, who possibly was the same individual 



174 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

who married Katharine, daughter of Thomas de Ickworth,i by Johanna his wife, 
daughter and co-heiress of Johannes de Geddyng, and then to his son, John Cockerell, 
who died 6 Hen. VI. (1428). This John Cockerell died 6 Hen. VI. (1428), leaving 
a widow Katharine who died 10 Hen. VI. seised of the Manor of Wangford and the 
reversion in the Manor of Ickworth. The only issue was a daughter, Katharine, 
who died also 10 Hen. VI. without issue. 2 

' This Thomas Ickworth was son and heir of Thomas dc Icicworth, son of Thomas dc Ickworth, 
living 14 Edw.I., son of Johannes de Ickworth, son of Thomas de Ickworth, /. Hen. III., son of 
Richard de Ickworth, and Sibilla, daughter of Johannes de IVIaustin, son of William de Ickworth, t. 
Hen. II., son of Goslinus, son of Wluardus de Wanford, living 12 Hen. I. 

= On the death of Katharine Cockerell, who was entitled to the Manor of Wainford and to the 
reversion of the Manor of Ickworth, expectant on the death of Agnes de Ickworth, the title to the 
Ickworth Manor was the subject of contention. It was claimed by the Abbot of St. Edmund's, in 
virtue of his barony as an escheat, and the Crown procured an inquisition to be taken finding that 
George Hethe was the heir of Thomas de Ickworth, which was a mere pretence, the real object of the 
inquisition being to prove that the lands were holden of the Crown and not of the Abbot. Amongst others 
claiming, the Drury family founded a claim on a feoffment made by Katharine Cockerell, the grand- 
mother. The following interesting declaration was made by William Curteys, the Abbot of St. 
Edmund's, touching his title. " This is the tytle and the cleyme that the Abbot of Bury makyth 
on to the manor of Wainford, and to the revercyon of the manor of Ikworthe, aftyr the deces of Agneys 
of Ikworthe, that is to seyn Dame Katharine Cokerell was scsid of the manor of Wainford forseyd 
and of the revercion of the manor of Ikworthe forsayd in here demene as in fee, and of whiche estate 
sche deyed sesid ; aft whos deces the ryght of the manor and revercion forsayd discendid vn to 
Katharine as on to cosyn and heyr, that is to seyn, Katharine, dowghter to John, sone to Dame Katharine 
forsayd, at that tyme beyng with in age ; and for as meche as it was supposyd that the seyd Katharine 
shuld a deyed sesid of othir tenements whych wercn holdyn of the kyng be knyghtes seruyce, a diem 
clausit extremura was direct vn to the Eschetor of SufF., at that tyme beyng, be fors of whiche wryt 
it was fownden be an enquest that the sayd Dame Katharine deyed sesid of the seid manor of 
Wainford and of the seid revercion, and of othir londys and tenements holden of the Kyng be 
knyghtys seruyce ; and that the sayd Katharine dowghter of John was cosyn and heyr to the seyd Dame 
Katharine and with in age wherfore the Kyng sesid and graunted the warde vn to William Phelip 
and he over on to Robert Wynkfcld, be forsc of which the sayd Robert was sesid and toke the 
propytys of the sayd manor of Wainford alle the lyf of the seyd Katherine dowghter of the seyd John, 
the whyche Katharine deyed with in age with owtyn heir generall or special. And for as meche as 
the seid manors be holdyn of the seid Abbot be knight's service, and it was founden be an enquest 
after the deth of the seid Katharine, dowghter of the seid John, that the seid Katharine deied sesid of 
the seid manor of Wainford and of the revercion of the manor of Ikworthe, so the seid Abbot cleymyth 
the manor of Wainford and the reversion of the manor of Ikworthe forsayd as his eschete." 

By agreement the matter was ultimately referred to arbitration and by an award May 28, 
loHen.VI.it was determined that the Abbot should suffer Sir W. Drury and all others claiming the 
manors to recover the same by confession in an assize of novel desseisin, and by judgment against the 
Abbot, Sir William paying the Abbot 100 marks. Agnes de Ickworth, the tenant for life of the 
Manor of Ickworth, who had married again Nicholas Hethe, died in 14-37- Though the Manor of 
Ickworth was thus recovered by Sir William Drury, his cousin, Henry Drury, became actually 
seised and his only surviving child Jane married Thomas Hervey, who died before 1470, and was the 
ancestor of the present Marquis of Bristol and lord of the Manor of Ickworth. 



The three other Manors 



in 



Buxhall 



75 



Possibly the Manor of Cockerells Hall then passed to John, the son of Robert, 
the second son of the Robert who settled it in 1394, for we find from a Court 
Rolls of the Manor in 1474 preserved amongst the Additional Charters in the 
British Museum (26,177) that in that year a John' Cockerell, son of Robert, held 
a court. The following is a transcript of this early Court Roll : — 



Buxhale 

Cokerell 

1474. 



Inqi 



misericordie ijs. 



preceptum est. 



preceptum 



preceptum est. 



Prima Curia cum leta Johannis Cokerell filii Roberti Cokerell 
ibidem tenta die Jovis in Festo Sancto Augustini Episcopi anno 
regni Regis Edwardi quarti post conquestum quartodecimo. 

Ex officio capta super sacramentum Johannis Tylle Walteri 
Crytoft, Roberti Wode, Ricardi Orvays, Thome Mayken, 
Juratorum. 

xiid. vjd. 

ui dicunt quod Dominus de Howard, Ricardus de Darnold 



(e 



^ . iijd. iijd. 

larmiger, Thomas Spryng & Dominus Willielmus Hardyng Capel- 
Uanus sectam Curie & fecerunt defaltam Ideo in misericordia. 
Et quod Johannes Reysshebrook vendidit Thome Mayken unum 
tenementum nativum vocatum Tenwynter in Buxhale sine licencia 
Curie Ideo perceptum est illud seisire in manum domini & 
respondere de exitibus quousque &c. 

/Et quod Robertus Bolton succidit subboscum nuper crescentem 

[super terrain domini vocatam Brookefeld inter terram domini & 

jterram manerii de Lefeyhalle vocatam Bakhouscroft, quod pre- 

iceptum est emendare citra proximam letam Sub pena ijs. 

jEt idem Robertus Bolton accrochiavit de terris hujus manerii 

I ad terras manerii de Lefeyhalle in Bakhouscroft quod preceptum 

[est emendare citra proximum letam Sub pena ijs. 

Preceptum est distringere Dominum de Shellondhalle, Dominum 

de Howard Terras tenentes Cordes, Johannem Hardehed Cleri- 

cum, Thomam Spryng de Lamenhani, Clementem Man, Petrum 

Redenhale, Willielmum Candeler, Thomam Roungeton, Ed- 

mundum Ferthyng, Willielmus Hardyng Capellanus, Petrum 

Nell, Terras tenentes tenementi pachattes, Elizeum Munnyng, 

Terram tenentem nuper Willielmi Gomays, Willielmum Hendy 

et Edmundum Rysby et alios tenentes qui non dum fecerunt 

fidelitatem pro fidelitatibus suis domino faciendis citra proximam 

Curiam. 



i7« 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Ducenarii. 



Capitales. 



Jurati. 



(Et quod Edwardus Orvays et Willielmus Hendy etatis xij 
annorum et amplius moram traxerunt infra precinctum hujus lete 
jper unum annum et amplius. Et jurati sunt in Decenna domini 
(Regis. 

Nunc de Leta. 

Johannes Reysshbrook senior 
Robertus Bolton 
Johannes Tylle ) 

Walterus Cryketoft | 

Willielmus Rysby ) 

Thomas Mayken J 

Qui dicunt quod dant de comuni fine ex antiqua consuetudine 
ut patet in capite. 

/Et quod Willielmus Hendy accrochiavit ad terram suam de 
] comuni via apud Braserestrete latitudine ij pedium et longitudine 
j particate ad nocumentum vicinorum suorum quod preceptum 
est emendare citra proximani letam Sub pena iijs. iiijd. 
Et dicunt ulterius quod nihil habent ad presentandum hac vice. 



Davy, in his Suffolk collections, states that the Manor then passed to the 
Springs of Lavenham, but the exact date has not been ascertained. As a matter of 
fact the next dealing with the Manor appears to have been by one William Betts, 
but how he became seised, if he ever did become so, does not appear. He made 
his will, August 6, 5 Edw. VI. [15 51], wherein he describes himself as of Boxwell, 
and leaves the Manor to his son John Betts and his heirs, and in default of heirs 
to his daughter Agnes. The will is at Norwich and it contains this peculiar 
direction as to the Manor of Cockerells : " My Manor in Boxall called Cokerells 
to be let for three years to pay debts. J will that John my son shall have it at 
the same price George Saulter hiered it of Master Symonde, and all my corn and 
cattell to my son John to pay my debts with the ferm of the Manor, and my 
wife's dowry. If son John die and no will made, then my daughter Agi:es to 
enjoy the same and if she die then William Betts of Hadnam to be the lease 
of the Manor and corn and cattell." 

The will is certainly peculiar, and the probability is that William Betts had 
but a lease of the Manor. It is true that the devise is to his son John Betts and 



Communis 


finis 


xijd. 




preceptum 


est. 


Veredictum. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 177 

his heirs, which would at least imply a freehold interest, but the absence of any 
record of the Manor having been in the Betts family as an estate in fee and the 
use of the expression in the will, " be the lease of the Manor," which no doubt is 
a clerical error for "be the lessee of the Manor," go to support the view of 
William Betts being but the holder of the Manor for a term of years. 

Davy says that Sir John Spring, Knt., born at Lavenham, but settled at 
Hitcham, who died August 12, 1547, was lord of Cockerells Hall Manor. He 
married Dorothy, daughter of Sir William Walgrave, and, dying in 1554, was 
succeeded by his son and heir. Sir William Spring, of Palcenham. He married first 
Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Kitson, and secondly, Susan, daughter of Sir Anthony 
Jermyn, of Rushbrooke. He died in 1599, but seems to have disposed of the 
Manor in his lifetime for William Vesey of Hintlesham, son of Robert Vesey, of 
Hadleigh, clothier, specifically mentions it in his will of June 3, 1575, proved 
Nov. 18, 1577 (Inquis. post mort., 29 Eliz.), devising it with Gunnells (now 
Hollybush) to his younger son Charles and to the heirs of his body, and in default 
of such issue to his (testator's) son William and to the heirs of his body with divers 
remainders over. The two brothers, Charles and William, were the sons of the 
testator by his second wife, Joane, daughter of Robert Cutler, of Ipswich, and 
widow of John Walton, of Hadleigh, and the marriage settlement is dated Feb. 14, 
6 Edw. VI. William Vesey, the father, held his first court Sept. 7, i Eliz., and died 
July 4, 1577. Charles died without any issue of his body, and William Vesey, Charles's 
brother, came in under the entail, and amongst the Chancery Proceedings is a Bill 
of Complaint by William Vesey, filed with the object of perpetuating evidence 
and establishing the will of his father. In 1601 William Vesey, Charles's brother, 
was lord, and Sept. i, 43 Eliz., held a court, the roll of which is preserved 
amongst the MSS. of the British Museum (Add. ch. 26198). This William 
Vesey held another court June 28, i Jac, the roll of which is also in the 
British Museum (Add. ch. 26200). He married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward 
Reynold, of Holton, co. Suffolk (marriage settlement May 16, 18 Eliz.), and died 
in 1 6 16. His will is dated April 10, 1616, and it was proved at Norwich 
July 15, 16 16 (Inq., p. m., 14 Jac.) He was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Charles Vesey, who held a court Oct. 3, 21 Jac. I. (1623). He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Edmond Doyley of Shottisham, co. Norfolk, by Ann, 
daughter of Sir John Goodwin, and his marriage settlement is dated 24 Sept., 
3 Jac. By an indenture dated August 2, i Car. I., this Charles Vesey on the 
marriage of his son and heir apparent, Thomas Vesey, with Mary Bull, one of the 

24 



1 78 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

daughters of Thomas Bull of Flowton, co. Suffolk, covenanted to suffer a recovery 
of the Manor and the tenement Gunnels to provide a jointure for Mary Bull, and 
by indenture 20 Jan., 10 Car. I., after reciting that this recovery had not been 
suffered and could not be without inconvenience to the estate of Charles Vesey, 
certain other property known as Gosling in Hintlesham was assured to trustees by 
way of substitution and in order to secure the jointure. Charles Vesey died in 
1657, and was succeeded by his son Thomas, whose will is dated Feb. 20, 1678 
(proved Nov. 20, 1679). Thomas Vesey, of Hintlesham, was succeeded at 
Cockerells Hall by his son, Charles Vesey. Charles Vesey lived at Hintlesham 
and married Frances, daughter of Sir George Wenyeve, of Brettenham Park, and 
of Christian, daughter of Sir Dudley (afterwards Lord) North. His will is dated 
May 26, 168 1, and was proved July i, 1685. He left an only son, Dudley 
Vesey (so called after his great-grandfather, Lord North), who became lord of the 
manor on the death of his father, but died an infant about 1700, when the 
property passed to his uncle, William Vesey, of Elmsett, who was the last of the 
Veseys who could claim the position of lord. In 17 10 he sold the Manor and the 
demesne lands and a messuage called Waspes or Gunnells to Gregory Copinger, then 
living at Norton in the county of Suffolk. The deed is dated the 20th of April, 
1 7 10, and is in the writer's possession. The widow of Charles Vesey, who 
evidently was entitled to dower out of the property, and who had married 
John Tudman, of Hammerwich, Doctor of Physic, sold all her right in con- 
sideration of an annuity, and her interest was vested in Gregory Copinger by a 
deed dated March 2, 1709. This John Tudman had been the guardian of the 
infant Dudley, but whether before he married Dudley's mother or after does not 
appear. The deed of conveyance to Gregory Copinger Is sealed with a seal bearing 
the leg in armour. 

Gregory Copinger resided mostly at Bromehill House, in the county of 
Norfolk. In the chancel of the Church of Weting St. Mary in that county, 
at the east end on brickwork, is a stone bearing this inscription : — 

" Gregory Copinger of Broomehill House, 
who dy'd the 10"' P'eb. 1724 aged 65 years, 
Elizabeth his wife, bury'd the 19 of July 1702 
aged 40 years." 

The arms on the tomb are Copinger, Bendy of 6 or. and gu. on a fesse az., 
3 p!ates in a border arg., impaling Kirkham on a bend three cinquefoils. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall lyg 

By his will dated Oct. i8, 1724, Gregory devised his "manner or lordship of 
Cockerells with all the lands tenements and hereditaments and capital messuage 
and scite of the said mannor of Cockerells with their and every of their appur- 
tenances, and also his messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever 
being freehold or charterhold, with their and every of their appurtenances scituate 
lying and being in Buxhall in the county of Suffolk " unto his son Gregory for life 
with remainder to Gregory, testator's grandson, in tail male, with remainder to his 
nephew, Thomas Copinger, in fee. 

Gregory Copinger, son of the above Gregory, was High Sheriff for Suffolk in 
1724. He was also for many years Churchwarden of Buxhall Church, namely, from 
17 1 9 to 1740. He seems to have resided at Cockerells Hall, and dying in 1743 
was buried at Buxhall on October ist in that year. By his will, which is 
dated Dec. 22, 1739, and in which he is described as of Buxhall, Gregory, the 
son, devises to his wife his manor or lordship of Cockerells, and all his freehold 
hereditaments in Buxhall for life, and after her decease he devises the same to his 
daughter Sarah in fee. He gives all his copyhold tenements in Buxhall to his said 
daughter subject to an annuity of ^12 to his wife, payable "at the South Porch of 
the Parish Church of Buxhall." 

It is evident from this will that he had in some way become seised in 
fee of the Manor, for it will be remembered that under his father's will this 
was settled, and he, the son, took a life estate only. There are but two 
modes in which he could have become entitled to deal thus absolutely with 
the property by his will. Either his son Gregory had lived to attain 21, and 
the estate tail had been barred, or he, the grandson, having died (as was the 
fact) in his father's lifetime without issue male Thomas Copinger had become entitled 
in fee and had either conveyed or devised by will the estate in remainder to 
Gregory. 

In 1745 Sarah Copinger (the daughter of Gregory Copinger, the son), who had 
been baptized at Buxhall Oct. 5, 1724, married Thomas Moyle, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and by the settlement made on such marriage dated Dec. 8, 1745, the 
Manor of Cockerells, and all others the properties which Gregory Copinger the elder 
had purchased from the Veseys and others, were conveyed in strict settlement subject 
to Sarah Copinger, the widow's life interest. Sarah Moyle died June 17, 1764, 
aged 39, and her husband, Thomas Moyle, May 4, 1764, aged 44. They left 
issue, three children, one son, Thomas Copinger Moyle, and two daughters, Mary 
and Isabella. 



i8o History of the Parish of Buxhall 

On a stone lying even with the ground west of the steeple in the churchyard 
of Redenhall in Norfolk is the following inscription : — 

In memory of Sarah, Wife of 

Thos. Moyle Esq., 

And daughter of Gregory 

Coppinger of Buxhall, 
Who died y" 17 of June 

Aged 39 years ; 

Also of Thos. Moyle, Esq''*' 

Who died ye 4th of May, 1765 

Aged 44 years. 



lemi- 



Arms above Moyle — a mule — on an escutcheon Copinger, crest — two de 
dragons, sans wings, indorsed, and their necks interwoven. 

The son Thomas Copinger Moyle became entitled under the entail created by 
his mother's marriage settlement expectant on the decease of his grandmother, Sarah 
Copinger, and the entail was barred in Jan., 1769. 

In 1772 Sarah Copinger, the widow of Gregory, died, being buried at Buxhall 
Feb. 14, 1772 ; and Thomas Copinger Moyle on May 26, 1772, sold the manor 
and the estate to Thomas Garner, of Eldon, in the county of Suffolk. 

Thomas Garner died March 13, 1803, having by will dated Jan. 9, 1800, 
appointed all his property to be sold by his executors, who effected a sale to James 
Webster, formerly of the Island of New Providence in North America, but then of 
Powis Place, Great Ormond Street, London, on Nov. 5, 18 12. 

In 1832 James Webster sold the manor and estate to the Hon. and Rev. Henry 
Leslie, of Wetherden, in the county of Suffolk, afterward Sir Henry Leslie, Bart., 
who on April 20 in that year became Lord of the Manor. 

Sir Henry Leslie dying Dec. 9, 1849, '^he trustees of his will dated 
August 20, 1840, sold the manor and estate to Edward Bennett, who on 
Dec. 17, 1853, accordingly became Lord of the Manor. Mr. Edward Bennett on 
June 23, 1855, conveyed the same to Messrs. Frederick Harrison and G. Alderson, 
the trustees of his marriage settlement, who on Feb. i, 1869, sold to Mr. Thos. 
Jonathan Lock, who sold the manor and estate to the Rev. Henry Hill, of Buxhall, 
by conveyance dated Nov. 17, 1870, and the same is now vested by conveyance 
dated Dec. 17, 1897, in the writer. 



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The three other Manors in Buxhall i8i 

It is curious that the last portion retained by a member of the family of the 
estates in the county of Suffolk, at one time owned by the Copingers, should, after 
the lapse of a century and a half, be the first portion to return to another branch 
of the same family. 

An interesting point in regard to this Manor was put before one of the most 
eminent conveyancing counsel of his day — the late Thomas Coventry — in 1827. 
The question was raised as to the right to hold courts. The Court Rolls had styled 
the courts which had been regularly held " Courts Baron," and there seemed to be 
no free suitors as homagers of the court, but only copyhold tenants. The case was 
put on behalf of Mr. Webster, the then lord, and particulars were furnished of courts 
held in 1803, three courts in 18 13, 1825, and 1826. The Rev. Henry Hill, one 
of the tenants of the manor, having died, his son and customary heir declined to be 
admitted, being so advised by his attorney on the ground that the Manor was lost 
and that his lands had become freehold. The learned counsel, who was quite a 
specialist on copyhold tenure, advised that it was clear the Manor was in existence, 
and that Mr. Webster was fully entitled to hold a customary Court of the Manor, 
and this, notwithstanding that the former courts had not been so styled on the Rolls, 
but had been stated to be Courts Baron. In his opinion fealty was due from all 
the freeholders of the Manor which fealty not being within the statute of limitations, 
he considered the lord might claim at any time. But he added that, unless some 
badge of tenure be reserved as a quit rent, heriot, relief or the like payable by the 
freehold tenant, he thought the lord would encounter considerable difficulty in 
attempting to revive the Court Baron. 

{b) The Manor of Leffey or Liffey Hall. 

This Manor was anciently known as LefFye or Lefflye Hall, and in the time of 
the Domesday Survey was in the possession of William de Warren, a follower of 
the Conqueror. He was probably the son of Ralph de Warren, a benefactor to the 
Abbey of La Trinite du Mont about the middle of the eleventh century. The 
Duke of Normandy gave him the Castle of Mortemer, and he could not have been 
other than a young man at the time of the Norman invasion. His name appears 
amongst those who attended the Council at Lillebonne, and he is counted in the 
category of those present at the battle of Hastings, for his services in which he received 
three hundred manors, nearly half being in Norfolk. In 1067, on the King's departure 
for Normandy, he was joined with others in the government of England under Odo 



i82 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

and William Fitz Osbern. In 1074 he became a chief justiciary, and with Robert, 
son of WilHam Malet, routed Earl Ralph and his followers at Fagadune, pursuing 
them to Norwich, where the prisoners taken were mutilated by the chopping off the 
right foot, "an unmistakable proof," as a facetious writer of the last century observes, 
" that the sufferers had taken a step in the wrong direction." He married Gundred 
a Gundrada, of whom so much has been written respecting her relationship to William 
the Conqueror. They were evidently united before 1078, as in that year they founded 
the Priory of Lewis in Sussex. She died in 1085. In the rebellion headed by Odo, 
Bishop of Bayeux, in the reign of William Rufus, William de Warren stood by the 
King, and for his constancy — a rare virtue in those days — was rewarded with the 
Earldom of Surrey. He died in 1089. 

In the time of Edward I. the Manor was the inheritance of Sir Thomas 
Weyland, Knight. The Weylands are assigned by Davy as lords, but he has a note 
to the effect that it is doubtful whether they should be assigned to this Manor or 
to that of Fenn Hall. No doubt Davy's difficulty arose by finding that Fenn Hall 
Manor is included in the Inquisition post mortem on Sir Thomas Tudenham 
5 Edw. IV. and in that on Margaret Bedingfield 15 Edw. IV., they both being in 
direct descent from Sir Thomas Weyland through his eldest son. Sir William 
Weyland. As a matter of fact, however, there are two Manors bearing the name 
Fenn Hall — one in Buxhall and the other in Sutton — and the Weylands strangely 
seem to have been connected with and have held both Fenn Hall in Sutton and 
LefFey Hall, the lands of which almost adjoin those of Fenn Hall in Buxhall. 
The Fenn Hall Manor in the Inquisitions above referred to was no doubt the 
Manor in Sutton. 

Sir Thomas Weyland, the first lord of whom we have any account, was a 
somewhat remarkable character in his day. The eldest son of Sir John Weyland, 
Knight, and Mary his wife, and grandson of Sir Nicholas Weyland and Beatrice 
his wife, all of whom are buried in the Priory Church of Woodbridge,' he was 
bred to the law and rose to be Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. In the 
height of his prosperity in 1288 he found himself in the awkward position of 
being accused of screening and protecting some of his servants who had committed 
a murder. Whereupon he was arrested and delivered into the custody of Sir Robert 
Malet, from whom, however, he contrived to escape, and sought sanctuary in the 
Church of the Friars Minor at Bury St. Edmunds. Here he was permitted by the 
monks to wear their habit and to rest secure — not, however, for long, for the place 
' The arms of the family arc, argent, on a cross gules five escallops, or. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 183 

of his refuge coming to the knowledge of Edward I. within forty days of his 
escape, orders were given by the King that no kind of victuals should be conveyed 
into the monastic house in which Sir Thomas had found refuge, and the result 
was that all the friars, except three or four, were forced to depart. At length Sir 
Thomas himself was constrained to return to a layman's attire, and coming forth 
was delivered again to Sir Robert Malet, who brought him to London and shut 
him up in the Tower. On being brought before the King's Council he was offered 
either a trial by his Peers, to remain in perpetual imprisonment, or to abjure the 
realm. He chose the last, and barefooted and bareheaded and with a crucifix in 
his hand, was conveyed from the Tower to Dover, and from thence transported 
beyond the sea, where he died about 1290. His body was buried in the tomb of 
his ancestors in the Priory Church of Woodbridge, but his heart in the Priory 
Church of Sudbury. He died seized of Leffey Manor and also of the Manors of 
Brandeston, Charsfield, Westerfield, &c., and his widow Margery became Lady of 
the Manor of Leffey. He left issue by her three sons — William Weyland, John 
Weyland, and Richard Weyland. The last, 9 Edw. II., succeeded his mother, and 
Sir Richard Weyland dying 13 Edw. II., leaving an only child Cecily de Weyland, 
the Manor passed to her. Cecily married Sir Bartholomew Burghersh, 4th Baron 
Burghersh, one of the most eminent warriors of the martial times of Edw. III., 
serving on the staff of the Black Prince in the French wars, and attaining so 
much renown as to be deemed worthy of one of the original Garters upon the 
institution of that order. He journeyed into the Holy Land, and was sub- 
sequently for many years in close attendance upon his royal master, the Black 
Prince, during which period he participated in the triumph of Poictiers. He 
survived his wife and died on the 4th of April, 1369, in which year his last 
will was made in London. By this document he directs that his body be interred 
in the chapel of Massingham before the image of the Blessed Virgin ; that a 
dirge be there said, and in the morning a mass ; and that a dole should be 
daily given to the poor of that place at the discretion of his executors. To Sir 
Thomas Pavely (whom, with Lord Badlesmere, he had constituted executors) he 
bequeathed a standing cup, gilt, with an L. upon the cover, as also his whole suit 
of arms for the jousts, with his coat of mail and sword. He left an only daughter 
and eventual heiress Elizabeth, who then became lady of this Manor. She was 
married to Sir Edward le Despencer, K.G., a brother-in-arms of her father, having 
fought by his side at Poictiers, and for his gallant conduct been summoned to 
Parliament as Baron de Spencer from Dec. 15, 1357, to Oct. 6, 1372. He died 



184 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

in 1375, and Elizabeth Lady Despencer in 1409. Her daughter Anne married Sir 
Thomas Morley, fourth Baron Morley, summoned to Parliament July 16, 1381, and 
the Manor seems to have then passed into the Morley family. Their son Thomas 
married Isabel, daughter of John Lord Molines, and Thomas their son, the fifth 
Lord Morley, married Isabel de la Pole, daughter of Michael, Earl of Suffolk, who 
died in 1435. Their son Robert Morley, sixth Baron, married Elizabeth, daughter 
of William Lord Ros, and their daughter Alianore Morley was married to William 
Lovel, second son of William Baron Lovel, and their eldest son Henry Lovel, 
Lord Morley having died without issue, Henry Parker, son of their daughter Alice 
by Sir William Parker, Knight, standard-bearer to Richard III., became Lord Morley. 

The Manor in the time of Edward VI. belonged to Sir John Spring, who is 
called Lord of Liffey in the Buxhall Court Rolls of that reign, but in the next 
reign it passed to Robert Rychers, who also held free land of the Manor of Buxhall. 
He died 1589, leaving his son and heir John Richers, who succeeded to the Manor. 
He probably sold to Sir Robert Houghton, for we find him next mentioned as 
seised. He was a Serjeant-at-law and one of the King's Justices of the King's 
Bench, and died 22 Jac, leaving Francis Houghton, his son and heir, not only to 
this Manor, but also to lands in Brettenham and Hitcham. Francis died in 1629, 
and was succeeded by Robert Houghton, his son and heir. Robert Houghton, who 
lived at Shelton in Norfolk, made his will in 1660, directing his executors Robert 
Houghton and John Tuthill, to sell first his Sussex estates and then his Suffolk 
estates to pay his debts, which were numerous. He died leaving an infant heir, 
Charles Houghton, and his father's creditors obtained a decree in Chancery for sale 
of Leffey Manor and the other estates in Suffolk. A Bill was afterwards intro- 
duced into Parliament, and against this Sir George Pretyman, Knt., and Elizabeth 
his wife, widow of Robert Houghton and mother of the infant heir Charles, pre- 
sented two petitions, setting forth that the Bill would deprive Elizabeth of her dower 
and ruin her son and heir. On the Bill, 22-23 Car. II., the Committee reported 
that the parties should desist from any further prosecution. i 

In 1693 Sir Edward Hungerford was Lord of the Manor, and in the early 
part of the eighteenth century it passed into the possession of Joshua Grigby, a 
lawyer and town clerk of Bury St. Edmunds, who in 1723 married Mary, 
daughter of Richard Tulby, Esq., of Brockdish, co. Norfolk, High Sheriff of 
that county in 1729, by Frances his wife, niece and co-heiress of Thomas Tenison, 

' House of" Lords Journals, xii. 443, 460, 464, 468, 470, 472, 481. Cal. of House of Lords MSS., 
1670-1. House or Commons Journal, ix. 213. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 177 

his heirs, which would at least imply a freehold interest, but the absence of any 
record of the Manor having been in the Betts family as an estate in fee and the 
use of the expression in the will, " be the lease of the Manor," which no doubt is 
a clerical error for "be the lessee of the Manor," go to support the view of 
William Betts being but the holder of the Manor for a term of years. 

Davy says that Sir John Spring, Knt., born at Lavenham, but settled at 
Hitcham, who died August 12, 1547, was lord of Cockerells Hall Manor. He 
married Dorothy, daughter of Sir William Walgrave, and, dying in 1554, was 
succeeded by his son and heir. Sir William Spring, of Pakenham. He married first 
Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Kitson, and secondly, Susan, daughter of Sir Anthony 
Jermyn, of Rushbrooke. He died in 1599, but seems to have disposed of the 
Manor in his lifetime for William Vesey of Hintlesham, son of Robert Vesey, of 
Hadleigh, clothier, specifically mentions it in his will of June 3, 1575, proved 
Nov. 18, 1577 (Inquis. post mort., 29 EUz.), devising it with Gunnells (now 
Hollybush) to his younger son Charles and to the heirs of his body, and in default 
of such issue to his (testator's) son WiUiam and to the heirs of his body with divers 
remainders over. The two brothers, Charles and William, were the sons of the 
testator by his second wife, Joane, daughter of Robert Cutler, of Ipswich, and 
widow of John Walton, of Hadleigh, and the marriage settlement is dated Feb. 14, 
6 Edw. VI. William Vesey, the father, held his first court Sept. 7, i Eliz., and died 
July 4, 1577. Charles died without any issue of his body, and William Vesey, Charles's 
brother, came in under the entail, and amongst the Chancery Proceedings is a Bill 
of Complaint by William Vesey, filed with the object of perpetuating evidence 
and establishing the will of his father. In 1601 William Vesey, Charles's brother, 
was lord, and Sept. i, 43 Eliz., held a court, the roll of which is preserved 
amongst the MSS. of the British Museum (Add. ch. 26198). This William 
Vesey held another court June 28, i Jac, the roll of which is also in the 
British Museum (Add. ch. 26200). He married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward 
Reynold, of Holton, co. Suffolk (marriage settlement May 16, 18 Eliz.), and died 
in 161 6. His will is dated April 10, 16 16, and it was proved at Norwich 
July 15, 1616 (Inq., p. m., 14 Jac.) He was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Charles Vesey, who held a court Oct. 3, 21 Jac. I. (1623). He married 
EHzabeth, daughter of Edmond Doyley of Shottisham, co. Norfolk, by Ann, 
daughter of Sir John Goodwin, and his marriage settlement is dated 24 Sept., 
3 Jac. By an indenture dated August 2, i Car. I., this Charles Vesey on the 
marriage of his son and heir apparent, Thomas Vesey, with Mary Bull, one of the 

24 



lyS History of the Parish of Buxhall 

daughters of Thomas Bull of Flowton, co. Suffolk, covenanted to suffer a recovery 
of the Manor and the tenement Gunnels to provide a jointure for Mary Bull, and 
by indenture 20 Jan., 10 Car. I., after reciting that this recovery had not been 
suffered and could not be without inconvenience to the estate of Charles Vesey, 
certain other property known as Gosling in "Hintlesham was assured to trustees by 
way of substitution and in order to secure the jointure. Charles Vesey died in 
1657, and was succeeded by his son Thomas, whose will is dated Feb. 20, 1678 
(proved Nov. 20, 1679). Thomas Vesey, of Hintlesham, was succeeded at 
Cockerells Hall by his son, Charles Vesey. Charles Vesey lived at Hintlesham 
and married Frances, daughter of Sir George Wenyeve, of Brettenham Park, and 
of Christian, daughter of Sir Dudley (afterwards Lord) North. His will is dated 
May 26, 168 1, and was proved July i, 1685. He left an only son, Dudley 
Vesey (so called after his great-grandfather. Lord North), who became lord of the 
manor on the death of his father, but died an infant about 1700, when the 
property passed to his uncle, William Vesey, of Elmsett, who was the last of the 
Veseys who could claim the position of lord. In 17 10 he sold the Manor and the 
demesne lands and a messuage called Waspes or Gunnells to Gregory Copinger, then 
living at Norton in the county of Suffolk. The deed is dated the 20th of April, 
1 7 10, and is in the writer's possession. The widow of Charles Vesey, who 
evidently was entitled to dower out of the property, and who had married 
John Tudman, of Hammerwich, Doctor of Physic, sold all her right in con- 
sideration of an annuity, and her interest was vested in Gregory Copinger by a 
deed dated March 2, 1709. This John Tudman had been the guardian of the 
infant Dudley, but whether before he married Dudley's mother or after does not 
appear. The deed of conveyance to Gregory Copinger is sealed with a seal bearing 
the leg in armour. 

Gregory Copinger resided mostly at Bromehill House, in the county of 
Norfolk. In the chancel of the Church of Weting St. Mary in that county, 
at the east end on brickwork, is a stone bearing this inscription : — 

" Gregory Copinger ot Broomehill House, 
who dy'd the 10"' Feb. 1724 aged 65 years, 
Elizabeth his wife, bury'd the 19 of July 1702 
aged 40 years." 

The arms on the tomb are Copinger, Bendy of 6 or. and gu. on a fesse az., 
3 plates in a border arg., impaling Kirkham on a bend three cinquefoils. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 179 

By his will dated Oct. 18, 1724, Gregory devised his "manner or lordship of 
Cockerells with all the lands tenements and hereditaments and capital messuage 
and scite of the said niannor of Cockerells with their and every of their appur- 
tenances, and also his messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever 
being freehold or charterhold, with their and every of their appurtenances scituate 
lying and being in Buxhall in the county of Suffolk " unto his son Gregory for life 
with remainder to Gregory, testator's grandson, in tail male, with remainder to his 
nephew, Thomas Copinger, in fee. 

Gregory Copinger, son of the above Gregory, was High Sheriff for Suffolk in 
1724. He was also for many years Churchwarden of Buxhall Church, namely, from 
17 19 to 1740. He seems to have resided at Cockerells Hall, and dying in 1743 
was buried at Buxhall on October ist in that year. By his will, which is 
dated Dec. 22, 1739, and in which he is described as of Buxhall, Gregory, the 
son, devises to his wife his manor or lordship of Cockerells, and all his freehold 
hereditaments in Buxhall for life, and after her decease he devises the same to his 
daughter Sarah in fee. He gives all his copyhold tenements in Buxhall to his said 
daughter subject to an annuity of ^12 to his wife, payable "at the South Porch of 
the Parish Church of Buxhall." 

It is evident from this will that he had in some way become seised in 
fee of the Manor, for it will be remembered that under his father's will this 
was settled, and he, the son, took a life estate only. There are but two 
modes in which he could have become entitled to deal thus absolutely with 
the property by his will. Either his son Gregory had lived to attain 21, and 
the estate tail had been barred, or he, the grandson, having died (as was the 
fact) in his father's lifetime without issue male Thomas Copinger had become entitled 
in fee and had either conveyed or devised by will the estate in remainder to 
Gregory. 

In 1745 Sarah Copinger (the daughter of Gregory Copinger, the son), who had 
been baptized at Buxhall Oct. 5, 1724, married Thomas Moyle, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and by the settlement made on such marriage dated Dec. 8, 1745, the 
Manor of Cockerells, and all others the properties which Gregory Copinger the elder 
had purchased from the Veseys and others, were conveyed in strict settlement subject 
to Sarah Copinger, the widow's life interest. Sarah Moyle died June 17, 1764, 
aged 39, and her husband, Thomas Moyle, May 4, 1764, aged 44. They left 
issue, three children, one son, Thomas Copinger Moyle, and two daughters, Mary 
and Isabella. 



i8o History of the Parish of Buxhall 

On a stone lying even with the ground west of the steeple in the churchyard 
of Redenhall in Norfolk is the following inscription : — 

In memory of Sarah, Wife of 

Thos. Moyle Esq., 

And daughter of Gregory 

Coppinger of Buxhall, 

Who died y'' 17 of June 

Aged 39 years ; 

Also of Thos. Moyle, Esq''' 

Who died ye 4th of May, 1765 

Aged 44 years. 

Arms above Moyle — a mule — on an escutcheon Copinger, crest — two demi- 
dragons, sans wings, indorsed, and their necks interwoven. 

The son Thomas Copinger Moyle became entitled under the entail created by 
his mother's marriage settlement expectant on the decease of his grandmother, Sarah 
Copinger, and the entail was barred in Jan., 1769. 

In 1772 Sarah Copinger, the widow of Gregory, died, being buried at Buxhall 
Feb. 14, 1772 ; and Thomas Copinger Moyle on May 26, 1772, sold the manor 
and the estate to Thomas Garner, of Eldon, in the county of Suffolk. 

Thomas Garner died March 13, 1803, having by will dated Jan. 9, 1800, 
appointed all his property to be sold by his executors, who effected a sale to James 
Webster, formerly of the Island of New Providence in North America, but then of 
Powis Place, Great Ormond Street, London, on Nov. 5, 18 12. 

In 1832 James Webster sold the manor and estate to the Hon. and Rev. Henry 
Leslie, of Wetherden, in the county of Suffolk, afterward Sir Henry Leslie, Bart., 
who on April 20 in that year became Lord of the Manor. 

Sir Henry Leslie dying Dec. 9, 1849, ^^he trustees of his will dated 
August 20, 1840, sold the manor and estate to Edward Bennett, who on 
Dec. 17, 1853, accordingly became Lord of the Manor. Mr. Edward Bennett on 
June 23, 1855, conveyed the same to Messrs. Frederick Harrison and G. Alderson, 
the trustees of his marriage settlement, who on Feb. i, 1869, sold to Mr. Thos. 
Jonathan Lock, who sold the manor and estate to the Rev. Henry Hill, of Buxhall, 
by conveyance dated Nov. 17, 1870, and the same is now vested by conveyance 
dated Dec. 17, 1897, in the writer. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall i8i 

It is curious that tlie last portion retained by a member of the family of the 
estates in the county of Suffolk, at one time owned by the Copingers, should, after 
the lapse of a century and a half, be the first portion to return to another branch 
of the same family. 

An interesting point in regard to this Manor was put before one of the most 
eminent conveyancing counsel of his day — the late Thomas Coventry — in 1827. 
The question was raised as to the right to hold courts. The Court Rolls had styled 
the courts which had been regularly held " Courts Baron," and there seemed to be 
no free suitors as homagers of the court, but only copyhold tenants. The case was 
put on behalf of Mr. Webster, the then lord, and particulars were furnished of courts 
held in 1803, three courts in 18 13, 1825, and 1826. The Rev. Henry Hill, one 
of the tenants of the manor, having died, his son and customary heir declined to be 
admitted, being so advised by his attorney on the ground that the Manor was lost 
and that his lands had become freehold. The learned counsel, who was quite a 
specialist on copyhold tenure, advised that it was clear the Manor was in existence, 
and that Mr. Webster was fully entitled to hold a customary Court of the Manor, 
and this, notwithstanding that the former courts had not been so styled on the Rolls, 
but had been stated to be Courts Baron. In his opinion fealty was due from all 
the freeholders of the Manor which fealty not being within the statute of limitations, 
he considered the lord might claim at any time. But he added that, unless some 
badge of tenure be reserved as a quit rent, heriot, relief or the like payable by the 
freehold tenant, he thought the lord would encounter considerable difficulty in 
attempting to revive the Court Baron. 



{b) The Manor of Leffey or Liffey Hall. 

This Manor was anciently known as Leffye or Lefflye Hall, and in the time of 
the Domesday Survey was in the possession of WilUam de Warren, a follower of 
the Conqueror. He was probably the son of Ralph de Warren, a benefactor to the 
Abbey of La Trinite du Mont about the middle of the eleventh century. The 
Duke of Normandy gave him the Castle of Mortemer, and he could not have been 
other than a young man at the time of the Norman invasion. His name appears 
amongst those who attended the Council at Lillebonne, and he is counted in the 
category of those present at the battle of Hastings, for his services in which he received 
three hundred manors, nearly half being in Norfolk. In 1067, on the King's departure 
for Normandy, he was joined with others in the government of England under Odo 



1 82 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

and William Fitz Osbern. In 1074 he became a chief justiciary, and with Robert, 
son of William Malet, routed Earl Ralph and his followers at Fagadune, pursuing 
them to Norwich, where the prisoners taken were mutilated by the chopping off the 
right foot, "an unmistakable proof," as a facetious writer of the last century observes, 
" that the sufferers had taken a step in the wrong direction." He married Gundred 
a Gundrada, of whom so much has been written respecting her relationship to William 
the Conqueror. They were evidently united before 1078, as in that year they founded 
the Priory of Lewis in Sussex. She died in 1085. In the rebellion headed by Odo, 
Bishop of Bayeux, in the reign of William Rufus, William de Warren stood by the 
King, and for his constancy — a rare virtue in those days — was rewarded with the 
Earldom of Surrey. He died in 1089. 

In the time of Edward I. the Manor was the inheritance of Sir Thomas 
Weyland, Knight. The Weylands are assigned by Davy as lords, but he has a note 
to the effect that it is doubtful whether they should be assigned to this Manor or 
to that of Fenn Hall. No doubt Davy's difficulty arose by finding that Fenn Hall 
Manor is Included in the Inquisition post mortem on Sir Thomas Tudenham 
5 Edw. IV. and in that on Margaret Bedlngfield 15 Edw. IV., they both being in 
direct descent from Sir Thomas Weyland through his eldest son. Sir William 
Weyland. As a matter of fact, however, there are two Manors bearing the name 
Fenn Hall — one in Buxhall and the other in Sutton — and the Weylands strangely 
seem to have been connected with and have held both Fenn Hall in Sutton and 
Leffey Hall, the lands of which almost adjoin those of Fenn Hall in Buxhall. 
The Fenn Hall Manor in the Inquisitions above referred to was no doubt the 
Manor in Sutton. 

Sir Thomas Weyland, the first lord of whom we have any account, was a 
somewhat remarkable character in his day. The eldest son of Sir John Weyland, 
Knight, and Mary his wife, and grandson of Sir Nicholas Weyland and Beatrice 
his wife, all of whom are buried in the Priory Church of Woodbridge,' he was 
bred to the law and rose to be Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. In the 
height of his prosperity in 1288 he found himself in the awkward position of 
being accused of screening and protecting some of his servants who had committed 
a murder. Whereupon he was arrested and delivered into the custody of Sir Robert 
Malet, from whom, however, he contrived to escape, and sought sanctuary in the 
Church of the Friars Minor at Bury St. Edmunds. Here he was permitted by the 
monks to wear their habit and to rest secure — not, however, for long, for the place 
' The arms of the family are, argent, on a cross gules five escallops, or. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 183 

of his refuge coming to the knowledge of Edward I. within forty days of his 
escape, orders were given by the King that no kind of victuals should be conveyed 
Into the monastic house In which Sir Thomas had found refuge, and the result 
was that all the friars, except three or four, were forced to depart. At length Sir 
Thomas himself was constrained to return to a layman's attire, and coming forth 
was delivered again to Sir Robert Malet, who brought him to London and shut 
him up In the Tower. On being brought before the King's Council he was offered 
either a trial by his Peers, to remain In perpetual imprisonment, or to abjure the 
realm. He chose the last, and barefooted and bareheaded and with a crucifix In 
his hand, was conveyed from the Tower to Dover, and from thence transported 
beyond the sea, where he died about 1290. His body was buried in the tomb of 
his ancestors in the Priory Church of Woodbridge, but his heart In the Priory 
Church of Sudbury. He died seized of Leffey Manor and also of the Manors of 
Brandeston, Charsfield, Westerfield, &c., and his widow Margery became Lady of 
the Manor of Leffey. He left issue by her three sons — William Weyland, John 
Weyland, and Richard Weyland. The last, 9 Edw. II., succeeded his mother, and 
Sir Richard Weyland dying 13 Edw. II., leaving an only child Cecily de Weyland, 
the Manor passed to her. Cecily married Sir Bartholomew Burghersh, 4th Baron 
Burghersh, one of the most eminent warriors of the martial times of Edw. III., 
serving on the staff of the Black Prince In the French wars, and attaining so 
much renown as to be deemed worthy of one of the original Garters upon the 
institution of that order. He journeyed into the Holy Land, and was sub- 
sequently for many years in close attendance upon his royal master, the Black 
Prince, during which period he participated In the triumph of Polctiers. He 
survived his wife and died on the 4th of April, 1369, in which year his last 
will was made in London. By this document he directs that his body be Interred 
in the chapel of Massingham before the image of the Blessed Virgin ; that a 
dirge be there said, and in the morning a mass ; and that a dole should be 
daily given to the poor of that place at the discretion of his executors. To Sir 
Thomas Pavely (whom, with Lord Badlesmere, he had constituted executors) he 
bequeathed a standing cup, gilt, with an L. upon the cover, as also his whole suit 
of arms for the jousts, with his coat of mail and sword. He left an only daughter 
and eventual heiress Elizabeth, who then became lady of this Manor. She was 
married to Sir Edward le Despencer, K.G., a brother-in-arms of her father, having 
fought by his side at Polctiers, and for his gallant conduct been summoned to 
Parliament as Baron de Spencer from Dec. 15, 1357, to Oct. 6, 1372. He died 



184 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

in 1375, and Elizabeth Lady Despencer in 1409. Her daughter Anne married Sir 
Thomas Morley, fourth Baron Morley, summoned to Parliament July 16, 1381, and 
the Manor seems to have then passed into the Morley family. Their son Thomas 
married Isabel, daughter of John Lord Molines, and Thomas their son, the fifth 
Lord Morley, married Isabel de la Pole, daughter of Michael, Earl of Suffolk, who 
died in 1435. Their son Robert Morley, sixth Baron, married Elizabeth, daughter 
of William Lord Ros, and their daughter Alianore Morley was married to William 
Lovel, second son of William Baron Lovel, and their eldest son Henry Lovel, 
Lord Morley having died without issue, Henry Parker, son of their daughter Alice 
by Sir William Parker, Knight, standard-bearer to Richard III., became Lord Morley. 

The Manor in the time of Edward VI. belonged to Sir John Spring, who is 
called Lord of Liffey in the Buxhall Court Rolls of that reign, but in the next 
reign it passed to Robert Rychers, who also held free land of the Manor of Buxhall. 
He died 1589, leaving his son and heir John Richers, who succeeded to the Manor. 
He probably sold to Sir Robert Houghton, for we find him next mentioned as 
seised. He was a Serjeant-at-law and one of the King's Justices of the King's 
Bench, and died 22 Jac, leaving Francis Houghton, his son and heir, not only to 
this Manor, but also to lands in Brettenham and Hitcham. Francis died in 1629, 
and was succeeded by Robert Houghton, his son and heir. Robert Houghton, who 
lived at Shelton in Norfolk, made his will in 1660, directing his executors Robert 
Houghton and John Tuthill, to sell first his Sussex estates and then his Suffolk 
estates to pay his debts, which were numerous. He died leaving an infant heir, 
Charles Houghton, and his father's creditors obtained a decree in Chancery for sale 
of Leffey Manor and the other estates in Suffolk. A Bill was afterwards intro- 
duced into Parliament, and against this Sir George Pretyman, Knt., and Elizabeth 
his wife, widow of Robert Houghton and mother of the infant heir Charles, pre- 
sented two petitions, setting forth that the Bill would deprive Elizabeth of her dower 
and ruin her son and heir. On the Bill, 22-23 Car. II., the Committee reported 
that the parties should desist from any further prosecution.' 

In 1693 Sir Edward Hungerford was Lord of the Manor, and in the early 
part of the eighteenth century it passed into the possession of Joshua Grigby, a 
lawyer and town clerk of Bury St. Edmunds, who in 1723 married Mary, 
daughter of Richard Tulby, Esq., of Brockdish, co. Norfolk, High Sheriff of 
that couiity in 1729, by Frances his wife, niece and co-heiress of Thomas Tenison, 

■ House of Lords Journals, xii. 443, 460, 464, 468, 470, 472, 481. Cal. of House of Lords MSS., 
1670-1. House 01 Commons Journal, ix. 213. 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 185 

Archbishop of Canterbury, who died in 17 15. Joshua Grigby, whose will is dated 
April 26, 1770, died Jan. 6, 1771, at the age of eighty years, his wife Mary 
having died Aug. 13, 1766, aged 75, and both were buried in the Church of 
St. Mary's, Bury St. Edmunds. Their only son, Joshua Grigby, succeeded his 
father as lord of the Manor of LefFey Hall, and was elected, after a severe contest, 
one of the knights of the shire for the county of Suffolk in 1784. He married a 
Miss Bond, of Coventry, and had issue three sons and five daughters. He died 
Dec. 25, 1798, aged 68, and was buried at Drinkstone, where either his 
father or grandfather had in 1760 erected a mansion house. At this date, 1798, 
the farm was in the occupation of one Benjamin Baker. The property was 
subsequently acquired by the Fullers, for from 1809 to 1829 it was certainly held 
by John Fuller as lord. The manor was sold in recent years, and is now held by 
the Lamberts. The LefFey estate is not more than about 200 acres in extent. 

Some small pieces were formerly held by the owners of the Buxhall estates of 
this manor ; for instance : — 

1. Five acres of land called Stonyland, and seven acres of land called Spearmom- 

downs (originally in two pieces), lying together in Buxhall and formerly 
in the occupation of Thomas Plumb. Of these the rent was los. 6d. 

2. A piece of arable land called Quinshins, or Kinshins, in Buxhall, i abutting 

upon Wood Drain or the Wood Street Way, otherwise Broad Brook 
Street, leading from Buxhall Church to Fasbourn Hall north-west and 
north, containing 17a. ir. 6p. The real quantity seems to have been 
251 acres. The rent of this was lis. lod. This land was in 1743 in 
the occupation of Thomas Poole. 

3. A piece of pasture called Hallfield, containing 8a. or. 35p., abutting upon 

the Wood Drayne north, and formerly in the occupation of Edmund 

Griggs. This piece lay opposite to Fasbourn Hall, and was of the rent 

of 5s. 8d. 

This last piece was enfranchised as far back as 1742 by lease and release of 

the 4th and 5th of February in that year, and the rest subsequently, all now 

forms part of the general Buxhall estate. 

The owner of LefFey Hall also held certain lands as free tenant of the Manor 
of Buxhall, namely, forty acres called the " olde ponde felde," and later known as 
" Brodmedowes," parcel of the Manor of LefFey, at a rent of ij' j''. The description 

' In admittance Jan. 14, 1743, "between lands formerly of Richard Wood called Peasccroft east 
and Wood Street way west." 

25 



1 86 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

of the property as given in the Buxhall Court Rolls shows that it was situate near 
Noah's Ark Farm, and it is easily identified by reason of it adjoining certain 
property still held as copyhold of the Buxhall Manor. This is the description : — 
" Forty acres of land called Olde Pondefield, now (2 Mary) called Broode meadow, 
parcel of the Manor of Leffey extending along land called the 20-acres, and 
abutting on Cochsalls Meadow, held at the yearly rent of ij^ j"* ; and one 
croft of land containing 6 acres called Gunneldecroft [Genoldcroft 32 Eliz.] 
[parcel of the Manor of Coksalles lying in a certain field called Lyverfield] 
[Leversfeld] in Buxhall at the yearly rent of iij'' vj'' by knight's service, 
namely, three parts of one knight's fee, fealty, and scutage, with other services as 
appears by Court Rolls 25 Hen. VIII. and 2 Eliz." It was found July 22, 
2 Mary, that Robert Ryches, Esq., lord of the Manor of Leffey, was in arrear of 
rent for some years, and Jan. 24, 32 Eliz., that Robert Rychers had died, and that 
John Richers, gent., was his son and next heir and of full age, and a relief of 33s. ^d. 
had accrued to the lord of the Manor of Buxhall, and a precept was accordingly 
issued to the bailiff. On the 24th of March 22 Jac. I., it was found that Sir Robert 
Houghton, Knight, one of the King's Justices, had died seised, but we learn nothing 
more of this property nor of its subsequent devolution. 

(c) The Manor of Fenn Hall, otherwise Fenn Haugh. 

In the time of William the Conqueror this Manor belonged to Frodo, brother 
of Baldwin, Abbot of Bury. It was afterwards holden of the Barony of 
St. Edmunds. 

In 9 Edw. I., the Manor belonged to Sir John ' Tendring, from whom it 
passed to William Tendring, who had the grant of a market at Stoke by Nayland, 
31 Edw. I., and at the end of the fourteenth century it was owned by Sir William 
Tendring, who married Katherine, daughter and heiress of William Mylde, of Clare, 
and widow of Sir Thomas Clopton, of Kentwell in Long Melford, and on his death 
was buried in the Tendring Chapel in Stoke Nayland Church.' From Sir William 
Tendring it passed in 1421 to his only child, Alice Tendring,^ who married Sir 
John Howard, Knt., direct ancestor of the Duke of Norfolk. She made her will 
as Alice Howard, Oct. 13, 1426 [proved Oct. 25 following], devising her Manor 

> Harl. MS., 1530. 

- Tendring Hall from the Howard family passed to Lord Windsor and from the Reformation it 
was the scat of the Williams. Sir John Williams, Knt., and Lord Mayor of London in 1736, 
erected a fine seat here, which by purchase became the property of Admiral Sir William Rowley. 



J 



The three other Manors in Buxhall -187 

of Buxhall (should be in Buxhall) and Brettenham to her son, Robert Howard. Sir 
Robert married Margaret, eldest daughter of Thomas de Mowbray, Duke of 
Norfolk by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and co-heiress of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of 
Arundel, and cousin and co-heiress of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk. It was by 
this marriage that the inheritance of those great families became eventually in part 
vested in the Howards. Sir Robert Howard was succeeded by Sir John Howard, 
created in 1470 Lord Howard, and in 1483 Duke of Norfolk. He fell at Bosworth 
field under the banner of Richard III., and the usual forfeitures followed. We are 
not able to determine the date when the property passed out of the Howard family, 
but we know that the Manor became vested prior to 1544 in Sir John Spring, for 
by his will dated June 8, 1544, he devised "the Manor of ffenhall with the 
appurtenances and all his lands and tenements rents and services called Amptons 
otherwise called Hardhedder, Russhebroke and Langmers with their appurtenances 
in Buxsalle And also all those his lands and tenements rents and services called 
Nortons Kynchens, Blokks, Wolwarde, Bowleys, Byrds and Orbeys in Hecham and 
Buxall," to his executors for eleven years after his decease with remainder to his 
son William in tail male. Sir John Spring died August 16, 1547, and William 
Spring, to whom the estate tail was limited, managed to bar this, for Sept. 16, 
15 Eliz., he sold the Manor to James Ryvett,' of Bricett, a lawyer, who 
married Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Soame, of Wantisden (who died Aug. 23, 
161 7), and dying Jan. 30, 1587, left an only son, Thomas Rivett, of Rattlesden, 
who was buried at St. George's, in Southwark. He married Catherine, daughter of 
William Cotton, of Penfield Hall, in Essex, and died lord of the Manor in 16 10. 
His eldest son James having died in his father's lifetime, Thomas Rivett was 
succeeded by his, James's, son and heir, another Thomas Rivett, aged 17, at the 
time of his father's death. This last Thomas, who is described as of Rattlesden, 
married Joan, daughter and co-heiress of John Savill, of Netherton, in Yorkshire, 
and died in 1625 leaving no issue, when the Manor passed to his brother, Edward 
Rivett who died in 1660. 

In 1798 Sir William Rowley was Lord of the Manor of Fenn Hall, but how 
it was acquired by him Is not known. An advertisement of sale appeared in The 

I This James Rivett acquired a large inheritance, having property in Buxhall, Rattlesden, 
Onehouse, Shelland, Stowmarket, Finborough, Raydon Hall, W. Crctings, the other Cretings, Stonham, 
and other places. By his will, in 1586, he left to the poor of Stowmarket, a field called " Aldams," 
in Thorney hamlet, together with certain copyhold lands in Thorney, Campsey, Ashmanse. Over 
this land there was a lawsuit. On the death of James, the Manor of Fcnn Hall was found to be 
holden of the Barony of St. Edmunds. 



1 88 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

General Evening Post (London) of Tuesday, June 12, 1781, headed "To be sold, 
the several Manors of Wood Hall and Fennhall In Buxhall. The fines and quit- 
rents whereof com. ann. amount together to ^36 and upwards per ann." Wood Hall 
is described, but not Fenn Hall. Of course it is possible that Sir William Rowley- 
was a purchaser at this sale. Wood Hall consisted of 288 acres, 57 of which were 
in Buxhall. William Ennals was at that time the tenant. Sir William had by his 
wife, who died Jan. 21, 1850, amongst other children, a son afterwards Sir Joshua 
Ricketts Rowley, Vice-Admiral, R.N., who married August 10, 1824, Charlotte, 
only daughter of John Moseley, Esqr., of Great Glemham House, co. Suffolk, and 
had by her no issue. He was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1841, and died March 18, 
1857, and his wife December 11, 1862. His brother. Sir Charles Robert Rowley, 
of Tendring Hall, co. Suffolk, succeeded as fourth baronet in 1857, and by his 
marriage with the Hon. Maria Louisa Vannech, only daughter of Joshua, second 
Lord Huntingfield, had, among other issue, Sir Joshua Thelluson Rowley, the present 
baronet. Sir Charles died in 1888, and was succeeded by Sir Joshua Thelluson, who 
was born Feb. 8, 1838, and in 1887 married Louisa, daughter of the second Lord 
Lurgan. Sir Joshua is the present lord of this small manor, and the farmhouse, 
known as Fenn Hall, belongs to the Spinks family. 

Forty odd acres lying close up to the Hall were held under peculiar services 
by the lord of the Manor of Fennhall as free tenant of the Manor of Buxhall. 
The property was as follows : — • 

" Two pieces of land one called Stapelers and the other Amvers held at yearly 
rent of vj'', and one piece of land lying at the Fen formerly of Charioh Nevell 
[5 Edw. VI. formerly Salteres which Sir John Spryng 19 Hen. VIII. acknowledged to 
hold] and 37 acres of land and pasture called Denys Fylde [5 Edw. VI. formerly 
of Lord de Morley ; Denesfilde i Eliz.] and 3 acres of [i Eliz. and 7 acres of] 
wood called Fawkneres [5 Edw. VI. Fakners Wode ; i Eliz. then in seisin or occupa- 
tion of William Syer late in the seisin of Geoffrey Kynchon] at rent of xviij'' and 
Ward at the Castle amongst other services as by the Court Rolls of the 
5 Edw. VI. appears ; and one piece of land [5 Edw. VI. lying between land formerly 
of John Lemmey, late of Andreas Salter, on one side, and the meadow in the tenure 
of Benet on the other part, abutting on land formerly of the said John Lemmey, 
late of the said Andrew towards the west] containing 2 acres and 3 rods lying in 
Busshe close at rent iiij'', and one rod lying at Paynes Bridge held at rent of v''." 

Of the above it was found April 8, 5 Edw. VI., that Sir John Spryng died 
seised, and Sept. 30, i Eliz., that William Springe, Esq., held : At a court for the 



The three other Manors in Buxhall 189 

Manor of Buxhall it was found Oct. 10, 15 Eliz., that on Sept. 16 then last 
William Springe had sold to James Ryvett not only the above, but also " one 
tenement 3 acres of land and 7 acres of wood in socage held of the Manor of 
Buxhall at the yearly rent of xj with Castell garde." Sept. 12, 17 Eliz., it was 
found that William Spryng had sold two croft pasture and wood called Kynchnors 
containing ij acres at rent of ij'' ij'' ; and Sept. 23, 16 Eliz., it was found that 
"there was owing 16'' to the lord for 10 acres of land and wood called 
'Kynkyne' late of William Sprynge, Esq., but where the land and wood were 
the homage were ignorant." Jan. 24, 32 Eliz., it was found that James Ryvett 
had died, Aug. 31, 33 Eliz., and on his death being presented the Bailiff 
was commanded to distrain for the relief At a court Sept. 30, 6 Jac. I., it was 
found that Thomas Ryvett who held the above premises " by the service aforesaid 
holding, as in English ' by Castle garde ' had died and that Thomas Ryvett 
gentleman then aged 17 years and lately married then was and so at the time of 
his father's death was eldest son and next heir of his said deceased father to the 
premises aforesaid and It was commanded to the bailiff of this Manor that he 
prewarn the aforesaid heir at the next Court Baron for this Manor to be held 
to appear because the aforesaid lord claimed to his own use to have not only the 
custody of the lands, but the body of the said Thomas until his age of twenty 
and one years by reason of his tenure aforesaid, unless the said Thomas the son 
was married in the lifetime of his father," &c. It was found Oct. 11, 14 Jac. I., 
that Henry Syer, who held the thirty-seven acres above and three acres wood called 
Faukeners Wood at xviii'', had died, and that Henry Sier was his son and heir. 
April 22, 2 Car. I., it was found that Thomas Ryvett had died, and that Edward 
Rivett was his brother and heir. 



CHAPTER VII 
Houses of Interest in the Parish 

(rf) Fasbourn Hall or Copinger Hall, {g) Coles Farm. (») Fryers. 

(i) Buxhall Vale or Buxhall House. (/;) Gunnells, or the Hollybush. (<;) Farthings and Cleves. 

(0 The Lodge. (/) Park Farm. (;) Mill Cottages. 

(<i) Rivetts, or The Cottage. {i) The Butterfly. (y) Browns. 

(r) The Maypole and Purple Hills. (/) Kennetts. (r) Rudlands. 

(y~)The Valley. (m) Barkers. 

(a) Fasbourn Hall or Copinger Hall. 

THE Copingers were probably at Fasbourn Hall, or Copinger Hall as it is 
sometimes called, even before they were seised of the Manor of Buxhall. 
The name Fasbourn or Farsborn is no doubt from an early resident — 
Geoffrey Fausebroun, who was rector of Buxhall in 1332, and lived here from 
that time to 1361. This edifice, or rather a portion of it, is still standing, and 
occupied as a farmhouse. An inspection demonstrates that at one time the place 
was a residence of some importance, and completely surrounded by a moat, part of 
which is still filled with water. The house is approached by an ancient brick 
bridge which spans the moat. Many of the rooms are panelled with oak. Within 
the grounds, enclosed by the moat, is a mound of a similar description to that some 
years .since explored by the Berkshire Archaeological Society, and in which were 
discovered various Viking treasures, many of which will be found illustrated in T/ie 
Graphic of December 15, 1883. 

Fasbourn Hall is mentioned in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Buxhall in 
the times of Queens Mary and Elizabeth as " the tenement Fasborne," and in both 
cases is stated to be in the hands of the lord. 

This mansion-house is specifically mentioned in the will of John Copinger in 
1441, and in 1512 formed part of the estate of Sir William Copinger, Lord Mayor 
of London, being by his will devised in the following terms : — " I woll that my 
brother Walter Copynger and Beatrice his wife haue all my lands and tene'ts, rents 
and s'uices, called ffawsebornys, w' all their appurces sett, lying and beyng in Boksall, 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 191 

Hecham, and Bretnam, in the countie of SufF. To haue and to hold all the 
foresaid lands, tene'ts, rents and s'uices, w' the appurces to the foresaid Walter 
Copynger and Beatrice his wife during their natural! liffe, and the lyves of euery 
of theym longest lyving. And after the decesse of the saide Walter and Beatrice 
I woll that all the said lands and ten'ts and other the premes, w' the appurtenances, 
holly remayn vnto the said John Copynger, son and heyre of the said Walter, and 
to his heyres male of his body lawfully begotten. And for defaulte of such yssue the 
remayndre therof to the heyres generall of the said Wall Copynger my broder, to 
haue and to holde vnto theym and to theire heyres and assignes in fee for uermore." 
The Hall was evidently enjoyed with the rest of the Buxhall property by the 
Copingers, and was their place of residence. In the will of John Copinger, dated 
July 19, 1441, after giving to his brother Walter all his lands and tenements, rents 
and services in Buxhall, subject to certain payments, is the following provision, 
" And that the said Alicia " (she was testator's wife, and an annuity had previously 
been given to her) " have the chamber called the Chapel Chamber situate in the 
tenement called Fausebrounys with a certain chamber thereto annexed for her 
proper use, with free egress and regress to the same as often as she pleases for 
the whole life of the said Alicia, together with the utensils in the kitchen of 
the said tenement and likewise egress and regress to the hearth and to the pool 
there for drawing and having water with power to use the same and fish therein 
and with liberty of going into the garden there for taking fruit and herbs according 
as she pleases." Certainly Henry Copinger, Lord of the Manor, who died in 1675, 
hved here, for the fact is clearly to be deduced from the terms of his will. And 
that it continued to be held along with the other Buxhall property as late as 1692 
is evidenced by depositions taken under Commissions 8 Will. III., June 13, 
1698, at Stowmarket ; June 17, 1696, at Bury St. Edmund's, and preserved in the 
Exchequer. The plaintiffs were Sir Edward Ward, Knt., Lord Chief Baron of the 
Court of Exchequer, Samuel Ranstorne, merchant, John Walker, and the defendants 
George Gooday, Sarah Copinger, widow and relict of Henry Copinger, and Sarah 
Copinger (an infant under the age of twenty-one years, and daughter and heir of 
the said Henry Copinger), by Henry Ball, her guardian. The subject matter 
was:— "Towns, fields, and parishes of Buxhall, Rattlesden, Great Finborrow, 
Little Finborrow, Hitcham and Brettenham, in the County of Suffolk : and a 
capital messuage called ' Faseborne Hall,' and a tenement called ' Cogmans,' situate 
in Buxhall, ' or any other of the said parishes,' &c. Also touching a messuage, &c., 
called ' Cogsett Gardens,' &c., &c.. Metes and bounds, Mortgages," &c., &c. 



192 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Another deposition by commission Is also preserved In the same suit 
November 7th, at Bury St. Edmunds; and November 10, 1696, at Stowmarket. 
The subject matter as appearing in the forty-first report of the Deputy Keeper of 
the Public Records is " Capital messuage called Fareborne Hall, alias Fareborne's 
Hall in Buxhall (Suffolk) and the lands belonging, and a farm in Buxhall aforesaid 
called ' Cogsett Garden,' &c., formerly belonging to Thomas Everson and Edward 
Everson, and since to Henry Copinger and William Wade and John Pettit," &c. 

It seems that in 1681 Henry Copinger, being entitled subject to his mother 
Mary's life interest, sold to her his interest in remainder in Fasbourn Hall with 
other property in Buxhall absolutely. The deed bears date June 7, 1681. In 1686, 
upon his marrying, the Fasbourn Hall property was settled. It appears, however, 
that previous to this settlement the property had been mortgaged to Sir Edward 
Ward, but the particulars are not known. The mortgage must presumably have 
been made by Mary Copinger, Henry's mother as well as by himself, unless indeed 
it was a mortgage of the reversion only made prior to 168 1, which, however, is 
not very probable. It is quite possible that the charge existing In Sir Edward 
Ward's favour might have been a transfer of some prior mortgage created by Mary 
and Henry Copinger's predecessor in title. 

The mortgagee, Sir Edward Ward, who was Lord Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer, entered into possession and received the rents from 1692 to Michaelmas, 
1694, as appears from the following account rendered by his agent, Mr. 
Cocksedge : — 

Mr. Cocksedge's Account to Sir Edward Ward. 
The Accompt of Tho. Cocksedge for the Rents and Proffites of the Estate late 
Henry Copingers Esq' mortgaged to S"" Edward Ward, for two yeares and 
a halfe (to witt from our Lady day 1692 to Michmas 1694) made out the 
20 day of ffebry 1694/5. 
The Charge £ s. d. 

Reed for the Proffites of ffasborne hall Lands the time the 
same were unlett (that is to say) from our Lady 1692 to 
Xmas 1692 eighteen pd four shilling i peny ^ peny ... 18 04 01^ 
Reed of Will'" Lambert for ffasborne hall land from Xmas 

1692 to Michmas 1693 one & Twenty pd ffifteen shill... 21 15 00 
Reed of Jo. Pettit for a yeare & halfe rent from Lady 1692 

to Michmas 1693/ nintey pd ... ... ... ... 90 00 00 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 193 

I s. d. 

Due from M"" Goodday for the hall Close for a yeare and halfe 

at £$ los. the yeare to MIchmas 1693 ... ... ... 08 05 00 

The rent roll of the same Estat from Michmas 1693 to 

Michmas 1694 
Will'" Lambert for fFasborne hall and land for a 

yeare to Michmas, 1694 ... ... ... ^^25 o o 

John Pettit at the same time for a yeares rent... 60 o o 

Due fro : m' Goodday for a yeares rent at y° 

same time ... ... ... ... ... 05 10 o 



90 10 00 



the yeares rent is : £()0 los. 

the totall of the charge is 228 14 oij 

The Discharge £ s. d. 

Paid for two yeares & a halfe tax for ffasbornes hall and land 

to Michmas 1694 ... ... .-.. ... ... ... 012 07 08 

Paid for repaires for the same time ... ... ... ... 001 09 10^ 

Paid Jo : Pettit by rebate for two yeares and a halfes tax to 

Michmas 1694 thirty pd eight shill and elevenpence ... 030 08 11 
Paid for repaires at y° same time ... ... ... ... 004 

Paid Robt Davey for his Jorny to Ipswich for a witness ... 000 07 
No. 14, 1693 Paid S" Edward in money by bill 

at London ... ... ... ... ... ^^41 10 o 

Ap. 4, 1694. Paid him more in money by bill at 

London ... ... ... ... ... 37 00 o 

Feb. 9, '94. Paid him more in money by bill at 

London ... ... ... ... ... 43 09 i 

For returne of the two last sumes ... ... 00 04 o 

122 03 01 

Jun. 15, '95. Paid him more by bill at London ... .. 034 12 07 

For my two yeares and a halfe salary to Michmas, 1694... 007 10 o 
M' Goodday for y'^ hall Close two yeares & a halfe at 

Michms '94 013 15 o 



Sume ... 228 14 01^ 
Tho. Cocksedge. 



26 



194- History of the Parish of Buxhall 

The Fasbourn Hall Estate did not therefore pass into the Hill family, and 
was not included in the settlement made by the two Sarah Copingers on the 
marriage of the latter with Dr. Thomas Hill in 1709. 

The Estate, which consists of 189 acres, including what was formerly known 
as "Cogsetts Garden" and " Petits " ' was held in 1809 by one Holleck when a 
Robert Ward (presumably not a descendant of the Lord Chief Baron, its former 
owner) was the tenant, and afterwards passed to the Hillhouse family of Fins- 
bury Square, London, and was about five and twenty years ago sold to Mr. 
Cockrill, who mortgaged the same to Mr. Goodridge, who it is believed still 
hold. The land is farmed by Mr. William Mitson, one of the Churchwardens of 
Buxhall, who resides in the old mansion house. One of the fields on this property 
is known as the Bloody Meadow, so called on account of a noted duel fought 
there between two harvest men with scythes. The result of the conflict was 
somewhat serious to both, for each cut the other's head off — at least, so tradition 
sayeth. 

{b) Buxhall Vale or Buxhall House. 

This property belonged in the beginning of the eighteenth century to the family 
of Goddard. John Goddard died possessed of it in 1737, and was succeeded by his 
son and heir John Goddard, who by his will of the 30th of September, 1761, 
devised the same to his son John Goddard for life with remainder in tail. Two 
pieces of land, one known as Paynes Croft and the other as Benets Meadow, 
containing four acres and one acre part of the estate, were held of the Manor of 
Buxhall, and to these pieces of land John Goddard, the grandson, was admitted 
tenant on the 9th of September, 1762. Li 1779 John Goddard, the grandson, 
and his son, also named John Goddard, suffered a Recovery, and sold the property 
to Mary Maltyward, of Buxhall, spinster, in fee, who was admitted tenant to the 
copyhold portion March 26, 1779. Mary Maltyward by her will, dated the 14th 

' Petit became tenant at Michaelmas, 1681, under a lease made by Mary Copinger, widow. He 
held for nine years the term of the lease, at a rent of £^0, and agreed at the end of this term to 
continue at £(>o. He was still in possession in 1696. Thomas Evcrson was tenant, and died in the 
farm about 1658, and his widow continued as tenant for some time after his death, when thtr farm 
passed to her son, Edward Everson, for three or four years. The farm was subsequently in the 
occupation of Henry Copinger, sen., and then of Thomas King and John Durrant. When Petit 
entered into occupation in 1681 the lands held with Cogsett were a close called Barnfield,. eight 
acres, two closes called Cogsetts, a close called Camping field about ten acres, two closes called 
Great and Little Cozens, a close called Nine Acres, and a close adjoining called Six Acres. Another 
close called Twenty Acres, which had not been included in the holding ot the Eversons, was added 
to the farm when taken by Petit. 





















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Houses of Interest in the Parish 195 

of February, 1797, devised "unto her great niece, Elizabeth Sparlce Edgar, the only 
daughter of her late deceased nephew Thomas Edgar, gentleman, deceased, all that 
her message or tenement farm lands, hereditaments, and premises situate lying and 
being in Buxhall aforesaid and then in the tenure or occupation of herself and 
of Joseph Edwards, and theretofore purchased by her or her late brother, Robert 
Maltyward, gentleman, deceased, of the family of Goddard." She died March 11, 
1806, aged 81. Elizabeth Sparke Edgar was married to one John Garnham, R.N., 
and by her will of the 13th of April, 1832, directed that the property which was 
formerly stated to have been Goddard's and then to be in the occupation of John 
Green the younger, should be offered for sale to the Rev. Maltyward Simpson by 
valuation, and that if he failed for twelve months to elect to take her property it 
should go to the trustee John Garnham in fee. Mr. Maltyward Simpson seems not 
to have elected to purchase and to the copyhold part of the estate John Garnham was 
admitted on the i6th of October, 1835. John Garnham by his will dated June 10, 
1870, devised all and every his Mansion House, messuages, cottages, farms, lands, and 
other hereditaments situated in Buxhall aforesaid and Onehouse, Shelland, Harleston, 
Great Finborough, Rattlesden and Mendlesham in the said county, or any adjoining 
parishes or places all which were thereafter designated his settled estates, subject to 
and charged with the payment of an annuity of ^150 to his wife Caroline Phoebe 
during her life, to the use of Basil Brooke Garnham, the son of his late deceased 
nephew, Richard Enoch Garnham, during his life, he keeping the buildings in 
tenantable repair and insured for the benefit of the estate in competent sums 
against damage by fire and committing no waste. By a codicil, dated June 24, 
1870, to this will John Garnham devised the settled estate from and after the 
decease of Basil Brooke Garnham to the use of Gerald Richard Garnham during 
his life. To the copyhold portion held of the Manor of Buxhall Basil Brook 
Garnham was admitted January 12, 1874, and on his death Gerald Richard 
Garnham was admitted on the i8th of December, 1891. 

Buxhall Vale has not been in the occupation of its owner for many years. 
It was occupied for some years by Captain Ord, and is now the residence of Mr. 
Eugene Wells, the well-known sportsman and popular Master of the Suffolk foxhounds. 

Near the Vale formerly stood a messuage called Howletts, which name sur- 
vives only in that of a field. To this messuage however 17 acres was attached. 
In the early part of the seventeenth century, it belonged to Robert Rydnall of Men- 
dlesham, and was sold by him and his son Robert Rydnall to Thomasyne Copinger 
by deed dated January i, 1650. It was then occupied by William Wade. On 



196 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

October i, 1662, this property was conveyed by Thomasyne Coplnger to Henry 
Copinger, being then in the occupation of John Wade. In 1690 it was in the 
occupation of one Winter. Three pieces of land adjoining were also held by 
Robert Rydnall as copyhold of the Manor of Buxhall. One went by the name of 
Barones land, otherwise Barbers, 2 acres, " sometime parcel of a tenement called 
Fundlings ; " a second was a piece of meadow containing half a rod enclosed with 
trees lying next little Fowles meadow, in part towards the north and east, 
and the land of the Manor of LefFey, in part towards the south and west, with a 
way for a cart to go and pass from the said piece called Barbers field ; while the 
third was a piece of meadow lying next the Grindels or watercourse, in part 
towards the north and west, and to the land called Howletts in part towards the 
south and east. Robert Rydnall was admitted tenant to these April 12, 20 
Car. I., and surrendered on sale to Thomasyne Copinger, April 16, 165 1. 

(c) The Lodge. 
The present house is not of very early date, but it occupies the site on which 
an edifice stood for many centuries. The site itself was originally held free of the 
Manor. The house passed under the name of Benalls, and it was occupied with 
two crofts of land, two pightles with yard and separate pasture. In the time of 
Henry VIII. they were held by one John Warde of Woolpit, after whom probably 
the farm now known as the Butterfly was originally called. He by deed, 
Sept. 18, 27 Hen. VIII., enfeoffed Thomas Talmache, Robert Jewer, and others, 
to the use of Thomas Talmache and his heirs, and Talmache by deed, Feb. 21, 
32 Hen. VIII., enfeoffed John Salter, sen., to the use of John Salter, jun., and 
his heirs. By deed, Sept. 24, 37 Hen. VIII., John Salter, jun. and sen., 
enfeoffed Joan Salter, sister of John Salter, jun.; and by deed, Feb. 3, 31 
Hen. VIII., a certain William Brett released the Salters. Joan Salter married John 
Alborowe, who was found April 15, 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary, to hold at the rent of 
iij' vj'', payable to the Manor of Buxhall. He also owned two adjoining pieces of 
land, for Sept. 30, 3 Eliz., he acknowledged that he held " one piece of land 
arable called Crosseuers pightle, containing one acre and a half of land in Buxhall 
on the east of a tenement called Benallys, at the rent of 2s. 6d. and one piece of 
pasture containing half an acre which was then (3 Eliz.) enclosed lying in 
Buxhall near the field called Dimstallus held free at the rent of ij'' and lying on 
the west side from Benallys Tenement." On John Alborowe's death his son John 
Alborowe did fealty Oct. i, 15 Eliz. Five years later, April 3, 20 Eliz., it was 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 197 

found that John Alborowe had sold to Edmund Cooke, and the description then 
was " one tenement called Benalls with certain parcels of land and pasture to the 
same tenement belonging containing by estimation 15 acres lying in Buxhall at the 
yearly rent of 3s. 6d." Cooke did not long retain the premises, for on April 14, 
26 Eliz., it was found that he had sold to Robert Sellowes, who again sold to 
James Rought who did fealty, Oct. 12, 28 Eliz. The premises were then said to 
lie in Buxhall and Finborough, and to contain 7 acres only, but the rent iij' vj'' is 
the same so possibly the 7 was a mistake for 15 acres. By 16 10 the property had 
passed into the hands of the Lockwoods, for we find Thomas Lockwood doing 
fealty for it, May 17, 9 Jac. I. The entry does not give the quantity, but is 
merely this, " one free tenement called Bennalles lying in Buxhall and Great 
Finborough and for diverse free premises to the same tenement belonging and 
adjacent and being at Gardiners Street in Buxhall." On the Lodge Farm and 
situate on the Finborough highroad stood another house in the time of Henry VIII. 
called Taylors, probably occupying the site of two cottages now known as the Alms- 
houses, and it was enjoyed with ten acres of land and also two fields called Pyes 
and Hygmans, containing seven acres, which were held free of the Manor of Buxhall, 
at the rent of ij* ix"*. For this little property July 22, 2 Mary, William Goodridge 
did fealty ; and April 14, 5 Eliz., James Carter. It appears from the Court Rolls 
Oct. 7, 14 Eliz., that the property was held by knight's service, and on James 
Carter's death, leaving his son and heir, John Carter, aged twelve years only, a 
precept was issued Sept. 23, '16 Eliz., to seize. The description of the property as 
given March 27, 19 Eliz., is "one tenement called Taylor's, and seven acres of land 
called Pyes and Hygmans with the appurtenances lying in Buxhall, namely on the 
green called ' Fynbarrowe grene ' towards the east to the said green in part and 
land bond of the Manor called Woodfeilde in part towards the south to lands bond 
of Thomas Dockett towards the west and to lands called Benalls towards the north 
at the yearly rent of 2s. gd." A relief was then paid by John Carter. He sold 
to Nicholas Rosyer, who did fealty Oct. 13, 28 Eliz. It subsequently passed to 
Mirabel Jower, and from her to her daughter Margaret, who married Robert Salter, 
who did fealty April 14, 1645. 

All the above property became vested in Thomas Penning, of Great Finborough, 
tailor, about the beginning of the eighteenth century, and he left the same to his 
nephew, Thomas Penning, after whose death it was sold by the executors of his 
will and codicil, Thomas Pearle of Bildeston, Woolcomber, and Peter Clarke, of 
Ipswich, gent., to John Edgar, of Great Finborough, carpenter, by deed, Feb. 2, 



ig8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

1760. The property was then described as consisting of Bannals, Tufts, Great 
Rands, Pyes and Tallows, and two cottages containing on the whole 26 acres. 
Bannals, Tufts, and Rands had been in the occupation of Thomas Penning, then 
of William Lemmon, then of John Cuffley and subsequently of George Wallinger, 
who after Penning's death occupied Tallows also. At the time of the sale 
in 1760 the property was in the occupation of John Edgar and John Gooding. 
In 1740 another portion of this property, now known as the Lodge Farm, 
belonged to one William Bally, of Great Finborough, yeoman, and on it stood a 
house called " Corstards." By deed of Dec. 29, 1742, William Bally conveyed 
" the messuage called Corstards in Great Finborough and Buxhall between the green 
or highway there called or known Finborough {sic) towards the south and the 
land then or late of William Tallows on part of the north, and the land then 

or late of Daniel Riches and then of in part towards the weaste (sic) and the 

lands then late of Sir Roger North, then of William Woolnerston (sic), Esq., in 
part towards the east and containing together 14 acres" to the above named 
John Edgar who was then farming the land. 

Both the above properties were devised by the will of John Edgar, 
August 15, 1762, to his brother Thomas Edgar and Richard Rout in trust for 
his wife, for life, then for his daughter Mary for life with remainder to her 
children. In 18 12 the widow and the daughter (who had married Thomas 
Rust, of Stowmarket) were both dead, the latter having left an only child, John 
Edgar Rust, to whom by deed of the loth of June, 1812, the legal estate in the 
property was conveyed by the co-heiresses of the last surviving trustee of the 
will of John Edgar. 

By deed of the 12th of Oct., 1836, John Edgar Rust conveyed the above 
properties to the Rev. Copinger Hill, together with certain copyholds held of the 
Manor of Buxhall to which Mary Edgar had been admitted tenant Sept. 9, 1762, 
on the surrender of Daniel Grossman. The freeholds were : First, Low Meadow, 
3a. or. 8p. ; Little Meadow, 3r. I2p. ; Middle Low Meadow, la. 3r. i6p. ; Farther 
Low Meadow, 2a. ir. 3p. ; Stony pasture, 3a. 3r. I9p. ; Finborough Field, 
5a. 3r. 39p. ; Home Field, 4a. 2r. 34p.; site of buildings, yards, and gardens ; 
2r. 3op. j the Front Meadow, 3a. 2r. 37p. ; the Three Acres, 3a. ir. up.; 
Paddock Meadow, 2a. 3r. 9p. ; Rattlesden Field, 5a. or. I5p. ; the Cottage and 
yard, 38p. ; Six Acres, 5a. 2r. 8p. ; Great Costards, 5a. 3r. 2ip. ; the Cottage and 
yard, 2op. ; Costards Meadow, la. ir. i4p. ; Little Costards, 2a. 3r. i4p. ; and 
Costards meadow, 3a. ir. ip. ; containing in the whole 58a. 2r. 37p. exclusive 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 199 

of roads. The Copyholds were (i) a messuage with a garden adjoining, between the 
land late of William Baker, in Buxhall, near the Church ; and a close of ten acres 
with the way thereunto belonging, between the lands of the Rectory of Buxhall 
called Bedwell and the King's highway, holden at the rent of 8s. gd. ; (2) a 
meadow called Rush Meadow, la. 3r., lying between lands of the Manor of 
Finborough, late in the tenure of Sir Roger North, Knight, on the east, and the 
common rivulet on the west ; and an inclosure with the meadow at the end 
thereof, lying between the lands of the Manor of Finborough and Rush Meadow 
towards the north, and the lands of the Vicarage of Finborough called Mallyn 
Down on the south ; also a meadow, 2a. ir., between Mallyn Down and Bedwell, 
holden at the rent of 24s. 8d. ; (3) a close of 13a. called Sturman's Croft, 
between the King's highway south and the lands formerly of Sir John Gilbert, 
Knight, north ; (4) a meadow, 2a., between the river south and the lands late 
of Henry Richer, north, and abutting on the highway at Gardener's Bridge. 

The descriptions of each of these four portions of copyholds with the several 
devolutions until merged in the estate of the lord are as follows : — 

(i) Ten Acres near Bedwell. 

"One messuage with garden adjoining between land formerly of William Baker 
situate and being in Buxhall near the Church. 

"And one close of land lying near Bedwell containing by estimation 10 acres 
with a way to the same close pertaining lying between land of the Rectory of 
Buxhall called Bedwell and the Highway one head abutting on the way late of 
Henry Richer towards the east." 

The messuage has long since disappeared. It was standing, however, in the 
reign of Henry VIII., and with the 10 acres was, in the 19th year of the reign of 
that monarch, granted to Robert Gawges and Alicia his wife and Joan their 
daughter. Alicia Gawges surrendered, April 24, 3 Edw. VI., to Henry Richardes who 
was at the same time admitted. On his death Richard Rechers, his son and heir 
was admitted Sept. 30, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary. 

Henry Richars next had this property, aiid his son and heir, Thomas Richards, 
was admitted Jan. 20, 11 Jac. I. ; and he, Dec. 13, 1616, sold to Robert Gardyner, 
who was admitted the same day, and by his will, Aug. 15, 1636, devised to his 
second son Jeremias Gardener " all his messuage or tenement with all the 
buildings orchards gardens with all the lands meadow and pasture with all their 
appurtenances situate lying and being in Buxhall as well freehold as copyhold and 



200 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

then in the tenure or occupation of William Eye and William Fowler." Jeremias 
was admitted April 25, 1639. On his death his son and heir, Jeremias Gardner, 
was admitted April 15, 1650, and Oct. 4, 1670, surrendered conditionally to Anne 
Levett, of Parham Halchetson, widow, who being admitted Jan. 3, 1671, sold to 
Joseph Wood, Nov. 22, 1676, and he was admitted Jan. 26, 1676. Joseph Wood 
sold to William Bright, who was admitted to this property Nov. 20, 1696. The 
title after this is the same as Sturmynscroft, which see. 

(2) Rush Meadow. 
Description. 

" One piece of pasture called Rush meadowe [5 Edw. VI., Russhy meadow], 
containing i acre and 3 rods, lying between land of the Manor of Finborough, late 
in the tenure of [5 Edw., Thomas Smythe] Sir Roger North on the east, and the 
common Rivulet on the west, one head abutting on land of the Manor towards 
the north, and the other head on Stony pasture in part and Lock meadow in part 
towards the south. And one inclosure with meadow in the end of the same lying 
in Buxhall between land of the Manor of Finborough in part of Rush meadow in 
part towards the north, and lands of the Vicarage of Finborough called Malydown 
[5 Edw. VI. Mallyng Downe ; 16 16, Malindoune] on the south, one head abutting 
on land of this Manor [5 Edw. VI. in the occupation of Robert Crosse] late in the 
tenure of Thomas Lockwood towards the east, and the other head on land called 
Sandy [5 Edw. VI., Sondylonde Pete ; 16 16, Sondye lande] lands near Bedwell towards 
the west, containing 7 acres [and i rod], formerly more or less one other piece of 
meadow lying in 3 pieces, now together, adjoining and lying in Buxhall between 
land of the Vicarage of Finborough, called Malyndown, in part and the watercourse 
running from ' Gardners Bridge ' in part on the east, and lands of the Rectory of 
Buxhall, called Bedwell, in part [5 Edw. VI. and lands of this manor in part on the 
west abutting upon the highway and upon ' Gardners Bridge,' towards the south, 
and upon the meadow lying in Stony pasture towards the north, and containing by 
estimation four acres], one head abutting on land of the Manor of Buxhall late in 
the tenure of Daniel Richer towards the south, and the other head on land of the 
Manor of Buxhall called Stony pasture in part, and the land of the said Vicarage 
called Malyndown towards the north." 

This was granted by the lord in court April 8, 5 Edw. VI., to Henry Richardes 
" upon condition that the said Henry Richardes paid to Henry Copynger lord of 
the manor at the feast of All Saints next ensuing ^^5, and upon further condition 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 2oi 

that he (Richardes) finds for Alice Gawgys widow for the whole term of the life 
of the said Alice two cows of his own cows to the said Alice as well winter 
as summer [and] sufficient food so that the said Alice may take the profit of the 
said two cows to her own use for the said term of her life rendering thereof yearly 
for the aforesaid two cows to the said Henry Richardes x' and that he shall give 
to the lord henceforth for fine after the death of whatsoever tenant thereof or for 
alienation thereof xxviij' and do suit at the general court rendering therefor xxviij'' 
and do the other service therefore due and it shall be lawful for the aforesaid 
Henry to cut and take timber and wood growing upon the premises for the purpose 
of building a house upon any parcel of his bond lands held of this Manor without 
impeachment of any waste and not otherwise." And he did fealty. The title after 
this is the same as that of " Ten acres near Bedwell," which see, except that the 
first piece la. jr., Jan. 17, 1669, Daniel Richer surrendered to William Richardson 
and he surrendered to Joseph Wood, Jan. 12, 1670, conditionally, and Joseph Wood 
was admitted Jan. 26, 1676. The whole was with "Ten acres near Bedwell" 
surrendered to the lord Dec. 8, 1837. 

(3) Sturmynscroft. 
Description. 

"Thirteen acres [i Edw. VI., 14 acres] of land meadow and pasture called 
Sturmynscroft lying in Buxhall between land of the Manor of Buxhall and land of 
the Vicarage of Finbarrowe called Malyngedoune on one part and land formerly 
of Joseph Crosse on the other part one head abutting on land of the Manor of 
Finbarrowe Hall called Lowfield [5 Eliz., Lekefeld] and the other head abutting on 
the street called Gardyner's street [1676, formerly divided into four separate closes, 
one head abutting on the highway towards the south, and another head abutting on 
land formerly of Sir John Gilbert towards the north]." 

This in the time of Henry VIII. belonged to John Crosse, who i Edw. VI. 
surrendered to his son, Robert Crosse, who, by will, left the same to his brother, 
James Crosse, who was admitted Sept. 30, 5 and 6 Phil, and Mary, and died before 
July 15, 5 Eliz., when John Crosse, of Sudbury, his brother, was admitted. On John's 
death it passed, under his will Oct. 7, 14 Eliz., in moieties to his two daughters — 
one to Annie Doggett for life with remainder to her son John Doggett, and the other 
to Katherine Crosse. John Doggett sold his moiety to Jonas Pykes Dec. 9, 
43 Eliz. ; and he, March 26, 7 Jac. I., sold to Richard Walker. Katherine married 
Robert Cooke, and together they sold Katherine's moiety to John Doggett April 26, 

27 



202 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

35 Eliz., and he was then admitted and sold the same Oct. 6, i Jac. I., to the 
said Richard Walker, who was admitted same day. Richard Walker, being seised 
of the whole, died, and Henry Walker, his son and heir, was admitted and sold 
to Thomas Lockwood, who was admitted April 17, 1612. Thomas Lockwood by 
will Jan. 4, 1646, devised to his wife Anne for life, with remainder to his children 
equally. Other estates testator devised to his son Bernard. Anne, the widow, was 
admitted June 16, 1647. Bernard Lockwood was admitted April 5, 1670, his 
brothers and sisters releasing to him all their rights, Richard Lockwood Dec. 5, 
1 67 1, and William Lockwood, Edmund Lockwood, and Margery Pelborowe his 
sister, wife of Peter Pelborowe, Jan. 3, 1671. Bernard Lockwood sold to Joseph 
Wood and Maria his wife, who were admitted Nov. 12, 1681, and sold to William 
Bright who was admitted Nov. 20, 1696. William Bright sold all his copyholds to 
Edward Luther, of Helvedon Hatch, co. Essex, Esq., April 12, 1707, and he was 
admitted May 16, 1707. Edward Luther, Feb. 9, 17 19, sold the above "Rush 
Meadow" and "Ten x*\.cres near Bedwell " to Mabell Grossman, of Doding Hurst, 
Essex, spinster, who was admitted March 11, 17 19, and by will, April 9, 1728, 
devised the same to Daniel Grossman. He, April 29, 1730, was admitted and sur- 
rendered to uses of the settlement on his marriage with Elizabeth Barnes, one of 
the daughters of Michael Barnes, of Rickinfield, to the use of himself for life and 
then as to all except Gopperfield and Martin Pightle (6 acres parcel of Sturm.ans 
Groft) to the use of Elizabeth his intended wife for life, with remainder to the heirs 
of their body and as to the excepted part to Mabell, only daughter of the said Daniel 
by a former wife, but, if Mabell died in her father's lifetime without issue, the 
excepted closes were to go with the other land, with a proviso that if Elizabeth 
on the death of Daniel paid a certain sum to Mabell the excepted closes should 
go to Elizabeth — probably with other property. The facts do not appear, but either 
this Mabell died in her father's lifetime without issue or the sum of money was 
paid by Elizabeth — probably the former as another child of Daniel by his second 
wife evidently bore the name Mabell, for Daniel Grossman and Mabell, the wife of 
Nathaniel Flowerdew, described as the only children of the said Daniel Grossman 
by Elizabeth his wife, formerly Elizabeth Barnes, suffered a recovery on a sale to 
Mary Edgar, of Great Finborough, spinster, and she was admitted Sept. 9, 1762. 
Mary Edgar married Thomas Rust, and together they sold part of the Rush 
Meadow and other property, namely — the messuage and Groft containing la. and 
2r. ; the Home field containing 4 acres ; a close called the Alms House field, 
containing 3a. and 2r. ; and a piece of land containing 15 perches to the Rev. 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 203 

Henry Hill, then lord of the Manor, absolutely on Aug. 26, 1765, and to all 
the rest of the property, namely, the Rush Meadow, Sturman's Croft and the 10 
acres near Bedwells, John Edgar Rust, of Stowmarket, only surviving son and heir 
of Mary Rust, was admitted April 30, 1803, and he surrendered the same to the 
then lord of the Manor of Buxhall Dec. 8, 1837. 

(4) Meadow on Highivay at Gardiner's Bridge. 
Description. 

" One piece of meadow customary and heriotable formerly lying in two 
pieces containing i acre and 3 rods [1671, 2 acres] in Buxhall between the river 
on the south and land late of Henry Richer on the North one head abutting 
on a meadow late of the said Henry towards the East and the other head on 
the highway at Gardners bridge towards the west." 

Daniel Richar had this in the time of James I. as also " Fryers," and at a 
court held April 29, i Jac. I., it was found that he had died seised thereof, and 
his son and heir, Daniel Richar, was then [1625] admitted. On his death his son, 
Daniel Richar, was admitted Nov. 4, 1644, and he surrendered Jan. 7, 1669, to 
William Richardson, who was admitted Jan. 17, 1669, and sold Jan. 12, 1671, 
to Joseph Wood, of Buxhall. Joseph Wood sold to William Bright, who was 
admitted Nov. 20, 1696, after which the title is the same as that of Sturmyn's 
Croft, which see. This meadow was surrendered to the lord Dec. 8, 1837. 

Spikes. 
A further part of the Lodge farm iia. ir., formerly known as Spikes, 
belonged to the Fuller family, and was sold to the late Mr. Copinger Hill in 
1838. It was made up of part of Great Spikes (Tithe No. 535) ir. i8p. ; 
Munnels (part of 532 and 529) la. 3r. 37p. Munnels pasture (portion part of 
529), la. 2r. lop. ; Little Spikes (part of 534), 2a. 3r. 3p. ; Great Spikes (535) 
4a. 2r. I2p. At the same time from the Fuller family came what was formerly 
known as Buxhall Marsh. A house for many ages stood on it, but this has 
disappeared. 

The description and descent of this Buxhall Marsh are as follows : — 

" One messuage [3 and 4 Phil, and Mary newly built] called Buxhall Mashe 

[5 Eliz., Mershe] and 10 acres of land meadow and pasture to the same 

messuage belonging lying in Buxhall between land of the Manor of Buxhall and 

land called Benaldes [5 Eliz., Benallys] and land late of William Goodriche one 



204 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



head abutting on land of the said Manor and the other head abutting on a 
street called Gardiner's Street." 

Thomas Smyth, Agnes his wife, and Joan their daughter, were admitted to 
this property 9 Hen. VII., and Agnes, having survived her husband, under the 
description of Agnes Cater alias Smyth widow, surrendered the property to 
Henry Copinger, then lord of the Manor, April 24, 3 Edw. VI., by the description 
of eight acres of land more or less called the Buxhall Marshe. At the same court 
Henry Copinger granted the same to Thomas Langerwoode and his heir by the rod, 
on condition that he within 7 years erected on the said 8 acres of land a mansion 
house. The rent was xiiij'. suit of court and other services and fealty. Thomas 
Langerwode Sept. 30, 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary sold to Robert Crosse, who devised the 
same to his brother, James Crosse, who was admitted Sept. 30, 5 and 6 Phil, and 
Mary, by which time the eight acres had swelled to ten. James Crosse died, and 
his brother, John Crosse, was admitted July 15, 5 Eliz. John Crosse, described 
as of Sudbury, by will, gave to Anne Doggett and Katherin Crosse, his two 
daughters, his two tenements in Buxhall called the Marsh and Footes, with all 
the lands thereunto belonging then in the occupation of John Able, for the term 
of their lives, and after the decease of the said Anne Doggett her part to go 
to John Doggett, her eldest son and his heirs. 



Anne Doggett died, and her moiety 
passed to her son John Doggett, who 
was admitted March 29, i Jac. I., and 
Nov. 7, 2 Jac. I. ; surrendered conditionally 
to William Jower, of Great Finborough, 
carpenter, who was admitted Oct. 11, 3 
Jac. I. and by will devised to Robert 
Southgate the younger his " one halfe 
of the Marshe lynge in Buxhall," he 
paying to his brother William South- 
gate ^5 within one year after the 
decease of his father, Robert Southgate 
the elder. Robert the devisee was ad- 
mitted April 26, 161 5, and on Oct. 23, 
16 1 7, sold to Thomas Badkoclce, sen., 
who was admitted April 2, 161 9. 



Katherin Crosse was admitted to 
the other moiety Oct. 7, 14 Eliz., and 
married Robert Cooper. Edmund Cooper, 
Jan 24, 1 6 14, surrendered to use of his 
will, whereby he gave to Thomas Blogett, 
his son-in-law, " all that his parte and 
right which he had in that parcell of 
lande and pasture commonlye called by 
the name of the Marshe copyhould lyeinge 
in Buxhall ... in the occupacon of William 
Sowgate," upon trust for sale, and Thomas 
Blogett, who was admitted April 26, 1615, 
sold to WiUiam Southgate Oct. 11, 16 16. 
He was admitted and Oct. 2, 161 7, sur- 
rendered this moiety to Thomas Bad- 
kocke, sen., who was admitted April 2, 
1619. 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 205 

Thus the whole being in Thomas Badcocke, he died, leaving Thomas 
Badcocke his son and heir, aged 17, and he was admitted March 30, 1627, and 
again after 21, May i, 1633. On March 30, 1631, however, he sold to 
Elizabeth Copinger, daughter of William Copinger, lord of the Manor, and she was 
admitted April 19, 1637. She married Thomas Bucke, Esq., and August 29, 1640, 
surrendered to the use of him and herself, on which surrender they were admitted 
May I, 1 64 1. Thomas Bucke survived his wife, and, dying, left Thomas Buck, son 
of John Buck, his nephew and heir, and he was admitted Oct. 4, 1670. 
Thomas Buck, the nephew, mortgaged Feb. 2, 1670, to Joseph Wood, who 
was admitted Nov. 3, 1671, and Joseph Wood surrendered conditionally 
Dec. 22, 1676, to the Rev. Richard Kettilby, of Aspall Stonham. William 
Blomfield, 20 years later, had the property, for Mary Blomfield was admitted 
Nov. 2, 1692, as sole executrix of her brother William. She sold to Thomas 
Fuller, jun., of Buxhall, yeoman, who was admitted June 12, 1719, and at whose 
death Anthony Fuller, his only son and heir, was admitted August 16, 1763. 
Anthony Fuller by will Oct. 29, 1802, devised all his lands in Rattlesden 
and Buxhall to Robert Fuller, of Buxhall, gent., upon trust for testator's 
daughter, Mary Fuller for life with remainder to her children as she should 
by deed or will appoint, and in default of issue to William Hunt his daughter's 
husband in fee, and Robert was admitted May 27, 1806, and on his death 
Sept. 21, 1 8 13, John Fuller, of Boxford, yeoman, eldest son and heir of John 
Fuller, late of Isleham, in the Isle of Ely and county of Cambridge, farmer, 
deceased, who was the son and heir of John Fuller, late of Melford, shopkeeper, 
deceased, who was the eldest brother of the said Robert Fuller, was admitted Sept. 
21, 1 8 13, being the great nephew and heir-at-law of the original devisee. John 
Fuller, then described as of Combs, sold the above premises with the concurrence 
of Wilham Hunt (Mary Hunt having died April 24, 1828, without issue) to 
the Rev. Copinger Hill, then lord of the Manor, Jan. 6, 1838, when of course it 
ceased to be held as copyhold. 

Another part, now forming a portion of the Lodge Farm and originally 
copyhol'd of the Manor, came from the Everard and Warburton families. It was 
in early days held in one hand and known as Great Woodfield, but was 
subsequently divided into Great Woodfield, Middle Woodfield, and Little 
Woodfield. The description in the time of Queen Mary, and devolution and 
descent thence to the present time, are here given : — 

" One tenement sometime since wasted and one close of land called Great 



2o6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Woodfeilde containing 14 acres ir. and l. One piece lying in seven pieces in 
Buxhall between the wood called Buxhall wood on one part and lands formerly 
of Thomas Smyth late called Bayliffes and land of the said Manor in part 
and land formerly of Thomas Roger now of Robert Fitches in part and land 
now of Thomas Rosyer and late of William Goodryche in part and on the other 
part one head ' inde ubi tentumdudum stabat ' abutting on land of this Manor 
called the Marshe in part, and on land now of Thomas Rosyers in part [? on 
Lyttle Woodfeid, 15 Eliz.] and the other head abutting on land of the said Manor 
in part and on land formerly of John Dygby now of Sir John Gilbert in parte and 
on land late of Thomas Smyth now of the said William Smyth in part. 

" And one other close of land called Little Woodfield containing 4 acres yp. 
Jp., lying in Buxhall aforesaid between land of this Manor and land late of 
Thomas Smyth now of the said William Smyth on one part and land of the said 
Robert Fitches on the other part one head abutting on the Highway called the 
High Street, and the other head abutting on land of the said Manor." 

In the 1st year of Queen Mary Abigil Rycher, widow, held this property for 
life with remainder to her son William, and they were admitted Sept. 30, 
I Mary. William Richars conditionally surrendered April 15, 3 and 4 Phil, and 
Mary to Henry Murton and Thomas Smyth, and the former was April 20 following 
admitted. He sold to John Sellows alias Smyth April 18, 12 Eliz., and John 
Sellowes alias Smyth to Henry Crampton, who was admitted Oct. i, 15 Eliz. 
Henry Crampton by will April i, 16 Eliz., left all his lands to a child he 
expected, i.e., if a son, and if not a son to his executors to sell and divide 
between his children. And after reciting that John Asshold had sold to him 
certain copyholds in Buxhall, he directed that if this John Asshold should pay his 
executors /^ 1,570 and £^6 he should have the same back. John Ashfield was the 
executor, and he sold the above described property (having been admitted Oct. 14, 
16 Eliz.) to Robert Selowes, who was admitted at the same court as the executor 
had been. Robert Sellowes sold to Robert Reve, sen., who was admitted March 27, 
19 Eliz., and June i, 22 Eliz., 1580, sold to John Salter, who was admitted at the 
same time. Edward Salter was admitted as son and heir of his father John, and 
June 20, 6 Jac, sold to John Sellowes, who was admitted Sept. 30, 6 Jac. I. 
John Sellowes, by his will April 11, 16 Car. I., devised to William Sellowes, 
his youngest son, all his copyholds in Buxhall, charged with certain moneys 
for his daughters, Margaret, Mary, Judith, Sarah, and Winifred, and William 
Sellowes was admitted Oct. 25, 1641, and April 19, 1650, surrendered to Francis 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 207 

Copinger and his son Thomas jointly and conditionally, and they were admitted 
April 16, 1 65 1. Thomas Copinger died and Francis Nov. 29, 1671, surrendered 
to Walter Copinger, who was admitted Dec. 5, 167 1. Walter Copinger sold to 
John Diaper, of Great Finborough, yeoman, March 27, 1676, and he was admitted 
April 10, 1676. John Diaper by will November 14, 1676, devised to his daughters, 
Anne and Rose, Great IVoodfield. If either predeceased him without issue then 
to such of his daughters as should survive him equally. He gave to Susan, a 
daughter by his second wife. Middle IVoodfield which he purchased of Walter 
Copinger, but if she died without issue it was to be divided equally between all his 
daughters who survived. And he gave to Elizabeth Diaper Little IVoodfield, but 
if she died without issue, the same to be equally divided between all his daughters 
surviving. And he gave to his daughters a right of way over Little Woodfield. 

Great Woodfield only. 

Anne Diaper married one Sheppard and died in 1696, leaving two daughters, 
Dorothy and Anne, infants. 

Rose married John Girt and was admitted Nov. 4, 1678, and Oct. 28, 1704, 
sold her moiety to Hester Boggas, only daughter of John Boggas, of Great 
Finborough, gent., who was admitted (to 9a. ir. 1) Dec. 17, 1706, and the 
other moiety was surrendered by William Hallocks, and Dorothy his wife, 
and Ann Sheppard, May 6, 1706, to the said Hester Boggas, who was admitted 
Dec. 17, 1706, and consequently held or became possessed of the whole. 

Middle Woodfield. 

So this Susan Diaper was admitted Nov. 4, 1678. She married John Welham, 
and her son and heir, John Welham, was admitted Nov. 14, 1701. John Welham, 
jun., surrendered Nov. 13, 17 14, to Hester Bennett, wife of John Bennett, of 
of Framesden, grocer, who was on the same day admitted. 

Great Woodfield and Middle Woodfield. 
Hester Bennett, having both, died, leaving Edward Boggas, son of Edward Boggas, 
late uncle of the said Hester, her heir, and he was admitted Oct. 13, 1729. On 
Dec. 13, 1752, being then described as Edward Bogges, of Wheelly, in the county of 
Essex, gent., he surrendered to the use of Edward Everard, of Brightlingsea, in the 
county of Essex, gent., for life, with remainder to Mary Everard his wife for life, and 
afterwards to the use of the marriage settlement of the said Edward Everard and 



2o8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Mary his wife. Edward died and Mary was admitted for life, Nov. 6, 1756, the 
premises being then described as all those four closes or pieces of land called the 
Woodfields lying in Buxhall between other lands called the Woodfields on 
the part of the north, and the lands of John Edgar on the part of the south, 
abutting upon the way leading to High Street Green towards the east and the 
lands of Thomas Penny, towards the west, containing together by estimation 
19 acres, i rod and 28 perches. On the death of Mary Everard, leaving two 
daughters, the property was divided. To one moiety Mary, wife of 

Thomas Warburton, of Harleston, in the county of Norfolk, clerk, was 
admitted Sept. 22, 1786, and to the other moiety, Elizabeth Everard was 
admitted at the same time. On Mary Warburton's death her only son 
and heir, the Rev. WiHiam Philip Warburton was admitted April 30, 1803, and 
he admitted he held as free tenant other hereditaments. William Philip Warburton 
by will Dec. 31, 1800, devised to his wife Elizabeth for life, and after her 
decease to his daughter Elizabeth Mary Moore Cobb Warburton. Elizabeth, his 
widow, was admitted for life Aug. 26, 1822. She acknowledged to holding free 
other lands. The other moiety Elizabeth Everard by will, April 20, 1840, 
devised to her great-niece, Elizabeth Mary Moore Warburton, daughter 
of her late nephew, William Philip Warburton, and she was admitted to this 
moiety, March 25, 1841. On Jan. 30, 1845, the said Elizabeth Warburton and 
Elizabeth Mary Moore Cobb Warburton sold the above to the Rev. Copinger 
Hill then lord of the Manor. 

Buxhall Lodge stands on the division line of the two parishes of Buxhall 
and Great Finborough, and the front portion of the house is in the latter 
parish, and the back portion in the former. The whole of the property 
described under the head of Buxhall Lodge now belongs to the writer, and is 
let to and farmed by Mr. Hurren, who resides on the premises. 

(^) RivETTs OR The Cottage. 
This tenement with 10 acres was originally held free of the Manor at the rent 
of ix''. and in the time of Henry VIII. was known as Rivetts. On Sept. 30, 6 
Edw. VI. Robert Murton paid a relief to the lord of the Manor for it and did 
fealty. In 2 Elizabeth it was called Wymkysshes formerly Rivetts, and in the 
course of years its name grew shorter, and by the seventeenth century it became 
known as Windishes and was still in the Martin family, passing under the will of 
Richard Martin, dated June 27, 1709, in moieties to his two daughters — Mary, wife 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 209 

of Nuce Symonds, and Elizabeth, wife of Jonathan Ripper — for their lives, with a 
direction that at their deaths it should be sold. It was then the principal house 
of a small farm consisting of 53 acres and a half with which was joined a tenement 
called Highams occupied by one Henry Osborne. 

This last-mentioned tenement, called in Queen Mary's time Heigham, was a 
separate free tenement of the Manor, and held at the rent of j''. George Salter 
was the owner in Mary's reign, and in a list of Free Tenants made 2 Eliz. 
this house was still in his ownership, being described as " High'ms, alias Hilles." 
The name " Hills " was a common name for several of the fields now forming 
part of the Cottage farm in early days. Thus we find that Edward Salter, son and 
heir of the above George Salter, did fealty as a free tenant Oct. 8, 20 Eliz., 
for " two pieces of land called Hylls, and one piece of meadow called Hills 
meadow, containing in the whole by estimation 5^ acres in Buxhall, and 
one Tostin, called Hylls, formerly built on, with one close of land called 
The Entre, one close of land called Meadowegate close two tofts 
without tenements called Hills, joining Spertam, lying in Buxhall," the 
rent being viij''. ' Highams, at a later period, passed to Richard Martin, who, 
by his will of May 9, 1631, devised them to Peter Martin, who did fealty 
April 20, 1632. Peter sold to his brother, Richard Martin, who did fealty 
May I, 1633. 

The sale directed to be made by Richard Martin's will of 1709 was effected 
by deed dated March 27, 171 7, in favour of Edmund Bowie, Windishes was then 
-occupied by Robert Johnson. The conveyance included a field called Mearcroft 
ija. abutting on lands late of Syers and then of Thomas Brookes, east, west, and 
south, and upon lands of the Manor of Fennhall north; a field called Wallings 
5a. lying between lands of Edmond Bowie east and lands of the Manor of Buxhall 
north, and lands called Osbornes south ; a Meadow called Wallings Meadow 3r. ; 
a pasture called Hamlings then divided into two closes called Upper Hamlings 
and Lower Hamlings containing together 9a. abutting on lands of the said Edmund 
Bowie called Salters west, and land of the Manor of Fennhall in part, and the 
highway leading from Rattlesden to Stowmarket in part east, the north head abutting 
upon the customary lands of the said Manor and the south upon the said high- 
way ; a piece of meadow containing 3r. lying between the lands of the said Edmund 
Bowie and the lands of the Manor of Buxhall, west, east, and north, and the said 

■ George Salter in his lifetime sold his two pieces of land called Hills and the piece of meadow 
called Hills Meadow to William Syer. 



2IO History of the Parish of Buxhall 

highway south ; a pightle called Calves Pightle, containing i^a. ; a piece of ground 
called Meadow Gate containing 2ja. ; another piece containing ia. lying next Wallings 
land north, and Wallings Meadow west ; 3 closes called Bannards and one meadow 
adjoining, containing 12a. then divided into 2 closes called Upper Bannards and 
Lower Bannards, abutting upon the highway leading from Buxhall to Woolpit, north 
and west and upon Purple Meadow, and the lands of Frances Beales, south and 
east ; a close called Clarices Croft, containing 7a. lying in Buxhall between the 
lands of the said Edmund Bowie called the Sink east, and the lands of the 
Manor of Fennhall west ; and one tenement called Highams with, several pieces of 
pasture containing 3a. 

In the last-mentioned conveyance a field of two acres called Overhill close, 
lying between the lands of the Manor of Fennhall on the east part, and the lands 
of the Manor of Buxhall on the west part, one head abutting upon the lands of 
the Manor of Fennhall towards the north, and the other head abutting upon 
Wallens land towards the south, which had been demised by William Syer, 
June II, 1658, to Francis Sparrowe for 2,000 years, and vested in Jermin Skepper 
by assignment of Oct. 27, 20 Car. II., was also assigned to Edmund Bowie. 

Edmund Bowie, who at the time of his death held adjoining land (in 17 14 
In the occupation of Thomas Poole and William Bawley), under the will of his 
father, John Bowie, dated Jan. 21, 1714, by his will of April 27, 1738, 
devised the above-mentioned property to his eldest son, John Bowie, who, 
by deed, dated Feb. 10, 1756, sold it to the Rev. Abbott Upcher, of 
Bury St. Edmunds, and assigned to him the Overhill Close by deed Jan. i, 
1760, for the residue of the 2,000 years. Abbott Upcher, by deed of July 5, 
1760, sold and conveyed the freehold to the Rev. Dr. Henry Hill, the property 
then being stated to have been formerly in the occupation of Thomas Poole, 
afterwards of Edmund Bowie, and then of John Fuller. The conveyance to 
Dr. Hill included also a messuage which in 1698 was occupied by John Barnes 
and which, March 26, 1698, had been granted by Mark Salter, gent., to William 
Bowie, yeoman, with twelve acres in Buxhall ; and also the close called the Sink 
alias Higham Croft, abutting upon the highway leading from Buxhall Church to 
Rattlesden in part, and the land of Richard Martin in part towards the south ; 
and Marecroft Meadow containing ten acres, abutting in part on the lands belonging 
to Fennhall in part north, and upon Hill's Entry east, and upon Clarke's Croft 
west ; and one other close called Wheatcroft, abutting on Punstons Close in part, 
and Clarke's Croft Meadow in part south and Pickmords Close north and 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 2ii 

upon Gardenfield east and Worlings Close west, which had been conveyed to 
William Bowie by Mary Griggs, widow, and Edmund Griggs, by a deed dated 
March 26, 1707, and had passed under his will of Jan. 21, 17 14, mentioned 
above to his son Edmund. Overhill Close was assigned to Dr. Hill by a deed 
of even date with the above conveyance. A small piece of land called the 
Patronage now forms part of this farm, but in many of the title deeds it is 
referred to separately. It was granted Sept. 30, 6 Edw. VI., by the lord with 
the consent of Henry Rycher, his farmer, under the description of " a small piece 
of land of old time called ' le Patronage ' lying at the end of the site of the 
Rectory as now it is enclosed," to Henry Todd, Clerk Rector of Buxhall, for life, 
yielding to the farmer or occupant of the Manor, for the time being yearly xij"* 
and suit of Court. 

The two fields formerly called Hamlings and Baynards containing sixteen acres 
together with a tenement called Bennetts were formerly held free of the Manor at 
a rent of ij' x'*, by the Bacon and Marten families. They were, no doubt, at 
an early period surrendered to the lord and absorbed in the general estate. 
We find that as early as the 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary (1557), the practice 
of absorption had commenced, for 15th of April that year Robert Marten 
surrendered one cottage and eighteen acres of land to the same belonging to the 
use of Henry Copynger, then lord of the Manor. Francis Bacon had the 
property in the time of Henry VIII., and sold it in 1557 to Robert Marten as is 
recorded in a court held for the Manor Oct. 8, 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary. Robert's 
son, Richard Marten, March 29, i Jac. I. (1603), acknowledged that he held the 
above at the yearly rent of 2s. lod., and other services. Richard Marten died 
in 1 63 1, leaving his son and heir, Richard, who did fealty Oct. 6, 1631 ; but 
this is the last we hear of these fields and tenement as separate from the Buxhall 
Estate. 

Another field adjoining the Sink was known as Clarke's Croft, or Pightle, 
as far back as Henry VIII. 's time, and down to quite a recent period. It 
consisted of three acres ; but in the time of Queen Mary was described as near 
Skutles Lane, which later seems to have passed under the name of Hill's Entry, 
and evidently ran down from the road leading from Rattlesden to Buxhall between 
the Cottage and Highams to the lands of Fennhall. It was found July 22, 
2 Mary, that Agnes Salter had drawn one half-penny of yearly rent from this 
croft for divers years then elapsed, and the Bailiff was commanded to distrain. 
On what is not clear, for it would have been hard on the tenant to have 



212 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

to pay twice over. It seems to have been copyhold of the Manor of Buxhall, 
for John Salter Oct. 6, 7 Car. I., surrendered it to the use of his 
will, by which (April 27, 1631) he devised it to Jane Barton, his sister, 
by the description of, " All that his coppiehold Tenement wherein John Jacob 
now dwelleth together with the barne meadow ground and orchyard thereto 
belongeing with the appurtenances whatsoever commonly called ' Clarkes pightell 
or by whatsoever name the same is reputed or taken, containeing by Estimation 3 
acres,' situate in Buxhall." Jane Barton was admitted May 25, 1632, and 
with her husband, Henry Barton, sold to Richard Crosse, who was admitted 
Oct. 9, 1639. 

The whole of the above now forms part of the writer's Buxhall Estate, 
and the land is let to and farmed by Messrs. R. and G. Williams. 

(e) The Maypole and Purple Hill. 

The picturesque farm known as the Maypole is of considerable antiquity. 
It has passed under a succession of various names, but, like so many others, 
has now received what is almost a fixed designation through the Ordnance 
Survey. We first meet with the modern name applied to it in 1798. 

At the beginning of the last century the property was vested in Edward 
Beales, and later in his son, Francis Beales. It was then in the occupation of 
John Goddard and John Sterne. Francis Beales, by his will dated August 
20, 1728, left the property, which then consisted of 120 acres, to his son-in-law, 
William Sulyard, and Sarah his wife, for their lives, and after their decease to 
Edward Sulyard, their son in tail male, with remainder to Francis Sulyard, 
Edward's brother in fee. Testator's other daughter was Rachael Cocksedge. 
William Sulyard occupied the farm after testator's death, until his own death, 
when his widow Sarah carried on the farm till 1760, in which year the estate 
tail was barred by' fine and recovery, and then by deed of Oct. 11, 1760, 
the property was conveyed to the Rev. Henry Hill. About twenty-two acres inter- 
mixed with the freeholds were copyhold of the Manor of Fennhall ; and as to this 
part, Sarah Sulyard and Thomas Cocksedge, Francis Beales's grandson, as eldest son 
and heir of Rachael Cocksedge, covenanted to surrender. The farm now forms 
part of the Buxhall Estate. 

Included in this farm are three pieces of land known as Blackmans, two dis- 
tinguished by the name of Little Blackmans. In the time of Henry VIII. they 
belonged to Henry Muskett, and the description then was "two pieces of land 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 213 

called Little Blackmans containing 2j acres." A little later they were described as 
containing three acres. They were hedfree of the Manor at the rent of iij". 

Henry Muskett surrendered these two pieces of land to John Salter, 
25 Hen. VIII. His son, George Salter, succeeded, and he died before 17 Eliz., 
Sept. 12, for Edmund Salter, his son and heir, was then admitted. He surrendered 
to Thomas Martyn, who was admitted Sept. 28, 23 Eliz., and sold to Thomas 
Bret [Hearts, 43 Eliz.], who was admitted Jan. 18, 42 Eliz., and Oct. 2, 5 Jac, 
surrendered to Henry Osborne, who was admitted Sept. 30, 6 Jac. I., (1608), and 
sold Oct. 8, 1613, to Richard Marten, jun. (son of the Richard Marten of 1603), who 
was admitted the same day, and died leaving his son and heir, Richard Martin, an 
infant of four years old, who was on attaining twenty-one admitted April 15, 1635. 
Richard left two daughters, Mary, wife of Nuce Symonds, and Elizabeth, wife of 
Stephen Attmore. Mary died, leaving Richard Symonds, her son and next heir, who 
was admitted to a moiety April 23, 17 14, and together with Stephen Attmore 
and Mary his wife, March 26, 171 7, sold the whole to Edmund Bowie, of Kettle- 
baston, yeoman, who was admitted July 9, 17 17. Edmund Bowie by will left the 
above property to his son, John Bowie, who was admitted June 6, 1738, and 
August 7, 1760, sold the same to the Rev. Henry Hill, then lord of the Manor, 
absolutely, and it now forms part of the Buxhall Estate. 

Purple Hills. 
This is now represented by two old cottages in Fen Street, and the land round 
is held with the Maypole Farm. Originally one tenement, known as Rysbys, and 
later as Kyssebyes, occupied the site, which was free land of the Manor. In the third 
year of Edward VI., April 24, Margaret Salter, relict of John Salter, " bocher," did 
fealty and paid a relief to the lord. She held for life with remainder to her 
daughter Joan. The description of the property at this time was " one tenement 
called Rysbys with a croft adjoining containing by estimation 2 acres lying in 
Buxhall near land of Edward Salter called ' Tylar's ' on the east, and a way leading 
from Fenne Street on the west, with 3 acres of land, one acre and a half of 
meadow one acre pasture to the same pertaining." It was held by service of one 
" clavi Gariofili " per annum and suit of Court. At the same time Margaret Salter 
acknowledged that she" held free of the Manor one croft or pightle called Paynys, 
lying at the north end of the croft and tenement aforesaid, at the yearly rent of ix'^. 
John Salter, who died i Eliz., left the premises to his wife Isabella, and she did 
fealty Sept. 30, i Eliz., paying a relief of ix''. In 1603 the property was held by 



214 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

the Rev. George Dickenson, the Rector of Buxhall, in right of his wife, he having 
married Elizabeth Salter, the widow of Mr. Salter. Elizabeth Dickenson died in 
1 6 13, and it was found at a court held Oct. 8 that year that John Salter, aged 
fifty and upwards, was her son and next heir. This property now forms part of the 
Buxhall Estate. 

(/) The Valley. 

This, or rather a portion of this farm, was formerly known as Wallers. In 
1710 it was in the possession of Robert Waller, and so acquired its name. It had 
previously been in the occupation of Ralph Keeling, and subsequently in that of 
Elizabeth Keeling his widow. At that time the farm consisted of the tenement 
and outbuildings occupying half an acre and the following pieces of land : 
Boycroft, 16 acres; Orchard field, 7; Streetfield, 8; Martin field, 12; Martin 
meadow, 8; Great Garners, 8; Woodfield, 17. Orchard adjoining church- 
yard, called Patronage, half an acre, and a moiety of a meadow called Shepherd's 
Ley, 14 acres, abutting upon Broadbrook Street towards the west, and a 
piece of arable land called Streetfield towards the north and upon Jordingleys 
south. In the whole therefore there were 94 acres, which were by deed Dec. 22, 
1 7 10, settled by Sarah and Mary Copinger upon Thomas Hill for life, remainder 
to Sarah Hill for life, remainder in tail. Thomas Hill having died, by deed 
March 20, 1744, Sarah Hill released her interest to her son Thomas, entitled 
under the entail, who by virtue of a deed April 2, 1745, and a Recovery Easter 
term 18 Geo. III., became absolutely entitled. Thomas Hill by the settlement dated 
June 6 and 7, 1745, made on his marriage with Lydia, daughter of Thomas 
Martin, of Whatfield, in county of Suffolk, settled the above property, then 
stated to be 87 acres exclusive of the moiety of Shepherd's Leys, and then stated 
to be in the occupation of Thomas Poole (together with the Coles Farm and other 
estates), upon himself for life, remainder to Lydia Martin, his intended wife, for 
life, remainder in tail, with ultimate remainder to himself in fee. There was only 
one daughter issue of the marriage, Lydia Hill, who died at the age of fifteen, and 
her mother took the above property absolutely under a general devise in the will 
of her husband dated July 5, 1746. She died in 1748, when it passed to the Rev. 
Henry Hill, and thence descended with the family estates. 

In the middle of the eighteenth century the farm was occupied by Thos. Poole, 
and was known as Poole's Farm for many years after his death. In 1763 it was in 
the occupation of one Richers. The farm is now held with some other lands by 
Messrs. G. and R. Williams as tenants of the writer. 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 215 

The road on which the Valley Farm stands is sometimes referred to as the 
road leading from Fasborne Hall to Buxhall Church, and at other times as Wood 
Street or Broadbrooke Street. The last is the better-known appellation. Some 12 or 
15 acres now forming part of this farm were held by free tenants of the Manor 
in former days. Henry Lambe held in the time of King James the First at a rent 
of ij"" x'', and sold off in three parts — one " seven acres held of the Manor free called 
Kinchens lying at Wood Street in Buxhall " was sold to the Rev. William Barwicke 
March 29, 9 Jac. I., who sold under the description of "8 acres called Kynchons " 
to Robert Gardyner, who did fealty June i, 1619. A second piece was sold off 
by Lambe at the same time to William Birde at an apportioned part of the rent, 
and the remainder described as " four acres of land called Langmeers lying at Wood 
Street in Buxhall " was disposed of to Edward Martin at the apportioned rent of 
ij^ part of the ij' x''. 

Certain other pieces of land which have been absorbed into this farm were held 
as copyhold of the Manor in early days. One holding known as Brookes was thus 
described in the time of Phil, and Mary : " Two pieces of pasture abutting on the 
Brook containing 2 acres lying between land of — Digbye Esq. and land of Robert 
Sellers ats Smyth and land of the Manor of Buxhall one head abutting on Woodfeld 
and the other abutting on the Brook and one other piece containing i acre lying 
between land of the said — Digbye and land of the Manor of Buxhall one head 
abutting on land of the Manor of Buxhall called Woodfeld and the other on the 
Brook and 2 pieces of land called Brokes containing 4 acres of land abutting on 
land of Richard Sare and one piece of land pasture and meadow containing 3 acres 
lying below Buxhall Woode." 

These were held by Henry Martin at the rent of xj* iiij'', and he was 
admitted April 7, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, and surrendered Sept. 30, 9 Eliz., 
to Richard Sare and Agnes his wife, and they, April 18, 12 Eliz., sold to Richard 
Reynolds, who was admitted Sept. 30, 12 Eliz., when the property was described 
as 2 pieces of pasture on the Brook " containing 4 acres more or less abutting on 
land late of Richard Sare, and one piece of land pasture and meadow containing 
6 acres lying beneath Buxhall Wood." 

Two other pieces of land now forming part of this farm were held by free 
tenants. One was described as " a piece of land containing one rod more or less 
lying in Buxhall between lands late of Robert Smyth and Robert Rydnall one head 
abutting on land late of the said Robert Smyth and the other head abutting on 
Broadbrook Street and a plantation with an orchard." This was granted by 



2i6 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

the lord in Court Sept. 30, i Eliz., to John Smyth and his heirs at a rent 
of x''. 

The other was described as a free tenement and one rod of land in Broadbrook 
Street described in the time of King James I. as " formerly of Richard Ellis." It 
was held at the rent of iij'', and was owned March 29, i Jac. I., by Thomas 
Risbye. This tenement stood on the south side of the land described as " 3J acres 
copyhold of the Manor and the cottage held with it." 

(g) Coles Farm. 

An ancient house with a somewhat involved history. It formed part of the 
old family estate of the Copingers, but we do not find it specifically dealt with till 
1675, when it was charged with a legacy of ^^^500 by Henry Copinger in favour 
of his daughter Elizabeth. The present farmhouse was probably erected in the early 
part of the sixteenth century. Several of the rooms are panelled, and one on the 
upper floor is exceptionally lofty, having an open carved oak roof. In the early part 
of the seventeenth century this farm was known as Powells, probably by reason of an 
individual of that name residing there, but in 1647 it was in the occupation of 
Thomas Pilborow, and for many years afterwards the place was generally known as 
"Pilborowes Farm." Thomas Pilborowe died in January, 1677. The legacy left 
by Henry Copinger to his daughter Elizabeth not having been paid within three 
years, Elizabeth, by virtue of a power given to her by his will, entered into 
possession. Her mother, Mary Copinger, evidently desirous of retaining the farm 
with the family estates, arranged with Elizabeth to purchase the farm and give to 
Elizabeth a mortgage on the property for the amount of the purchase money, this 
being secured by a term of years. This arrangement was accordingly carried out, 
and the farm, which was then in the occupation of John Harwood and Joseph 
Wood, was assured by Elizabeth Copinger to her mother Mary by deed May 22, 
1679, and mortgaged back by Mary to Elizabeth May 23, 1679, for a term of one 
thousand years. Elizabeth married Ralph Keling, citizen and grocer, of London, and 
by deed dated the 12th of March, 1679, ^^^7 assigned the term to George Goodday, 
who the next day assigned to Ralph Keling absolutely. On the discharge of the 
mortgage debt the executors of Ralph Keling assigned the term to attend the 
inheritance. The land passed, upon the death of Mary Copinger in 1699, to her 
heiress at law, her granddaughter Sarah Copinger, and formed part of the property 
which, by the deed of Sept. 10, 1708, was vested in Mary Copinger, the sister of 
Henry, for two thousand years, to secure ^^901, with remainder to Sarah Hill in fee, 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 217 

and not being paid the money, the property was on Sarah attaining twenty-one con- 
veyed by Sarah and her husband to Mary Copinger absolutely. Mary Copinger, by 
her will in 17 19, devised the property (subject to a trust for sale, which was not 
exercised) in favour of her great nephews, the Rev. Henry Hill and the Rev. 
Martin Hill, of Brettenham, in equal shares, and by a deed dated September 20, 1746, 
Mrs. Sarah Hill, as heiress at law and executrix of Mary Copinger, conveyed the 
property to them accordingly. The property conveyed to the two Hills by Sarah Hill 
was described as the messuage, lands, meadows, pastures, feeding grounds in Buxhall, 
late in occupation of the Widow Ramplin, since of John Gladvill, and then of Thomas 
Poole, and also several pieces of land called Jordans Lays in Buxhall, consisting 
of 23 acres, late in the occupation of Edward Griggs, and then of said Thomas 
Poole, and also that messuage in Buxhall late in occupation of John Haward and 
then of Thomas Crick. The moiety of Henry Hill subsequently descended with 
the family estate. The other moiety passed under the will of Martin Hill, dated 
Jan. 18, 1768, by which he devised it to his sister Mary, the wife ot Edward 
Ellison, of Henningstone, in the county of Suffolk, absolutely. In a mortgage made 
Dec. 31, 1779, for a term, the inheritance was limited to the appointees of 
Edward Ellison and his wife, and in default to them for their respective lives, with 
a power of appointment to Mrs. Ellison, and in default to her right heirs. Neither 
power was exercised, and she died intestate, leaving two children, Mary Seaman, 
widow, and Elizabeth, wife of Henry Mountain Neeve. Mary Seaman, then of 
Coddenham, by her will Nov. 5, 1821, devised her quarter share in the property 
to trustees upon trust for sale, which was exercised in 1844, and by deed dated 
April 16, 1844, the quarter share was conveyed to the Rev. Copinger Hill. The 
remaining fourth share Elizabeth Neeve, of Coddenham (but at the time of her 
death residing in Ipswich), being a widow, by her will dated June 25, 1830, devised 
to Charles Pritty, of Coddenham, grocer and draper, " in consideration of the 
kindness and attention shown to her." She died Jan. 22, 1842, and Charles 
Pritty died June 7, 1873, having by his will of August 14, 1867, devised his one- 
fourth to the appointees of his wife, and in default to her absolutely, but in the 
event of her dying in his lifetime to trustees for sale. Mary Pritty, testator's wife, 
having died in her husband's lifetime, on April 11, 1868, the trust for sale came 
into operation, and was exercised by a sale to the late Henry Hill, rector in 1877, 
the whole of the property which since 1746 had been held in shares, again coming 
into one ownership. Two of the fields forming part of this farm — those known 
as Paddock Meadow and Paddock Field, containing 3a. rr. 34p. and 6a. 3r. 32p., 

29 



2i8 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

and numbered 362 and 363 in the Ordnance and 520 and 519 on the Tithe Map, 
were formerly copyhold of the Manor of Cockerells. William Copinger, Esqre., 
surrendered these at a court held Jan. 4, 13 Car. I., under the description of 
" one messuage or tenement now wasted and eleven acres of land meadow and 
pasture thereto belonging holden by Court Rolls of the said Manor Together 
with an ancient Drift way for cattle carts and carriages upon the lands of Leffey 
Hay as often as there shall be occasion unto and from an acre of Meadow parcell 
of the said eleven acres (that is to say) sixty perches in length and in breadth 
ffifteen fFoote." The premises were surrendered to his son, William Copinger, 
Clerk, for life, with remainder to Henry Copinger, brother of the last-named 
William in fee. Thomas Hill was admitted June 10, 1726, the quit rent being 
I2S. A. bay gelding was taken as a heriot on his death, and Lydia Hill 
admitted Jan. 14, 1743. Henry Hill was admitted Dec. 3, 1746; Susan Hill 
and the Rev. Henry Hill Nov. 9, 1778, Elizabeth Hill for life Dec. 30, 
1828, and the Rev. Copinger Hill July 16, 1831, who enfranchised by deed 
July 21, 1864, duly entered in the Rolls of the Manor of Cockerells. The 
description at that time was " all that one tenement wasted and ten acres of land 
meadow and pasture called ' Paddocks ' and one acre of meadow lying between 
Fairsborn Hall lands belonging to Hillhouse now or late in the occupation of 
George Davey the younger towards the west, the south head abutting upon Wood 
Street way leading from Buxhall Street to Kirkbarn wood, and the north head upon 
lands late of Mr. Joshua Grigby called Parkfield belonging or lately belonging to 
John Fuller." In 1704 we find the farm in the occupation of Joseph Godfrey, 
but stated to have been formerly in the occupation of Thomas Pilborow and Richard 
Darcy. In 1709 the farm was in the occupation of Samuel Mootham, in 1719 in 
that of Thomas Crick, and about 1733 of John Coles, from whom it derived its 
present name. In 1763 the farm was known as Plumb's Farm, when it was 
occupied by Thomas Pool, who then farmed also the Valley Farm. In 1779 it 
was in the occupation of George Hart; in 1830 of Benjamin Coe and William 
Spink; in 1844 in that of William Spink alone; in 1854 in that of Messrs. 
Scott and Clover; in 1877 in that of Mr. Stearn ; and it is now occupied, together 
with the Valley P^arm, by Messrs. R. and G. Williams, as tenants of the writer. 

(/;) GuNNELL OR ThE HoLLYBUSH 

This farmhouse is an old-fashioned thatched edifice, standing directly on the 
highway leading from Rattlesden to Buxhall and Stowmarket. It was formerly 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 219 

known as Gunnells, later as Waspe Hall, and was together with Coclcerells Hall 
and three tenements called Birons, Southgates, and Brownes, part of the estate of 
Gregory Copinger the elder of Broomehill, Norfolk, and of Cockerells Hall. It 
originally formed part of the' Vesey property, and in 1683 was mortgaged by Charles 
Vesey and Frances his wife to William Panton, of London, leatherseller, and Benjamin 
Tudman, of the same place, goldsmith, for a term of 99 years, which term, the 
'mortgage having been transferred several times and the debt having been ultimately 
discharged, was by deed of March 5, 1709, assigned to George Goodday in trust 
for Gregory Copinger, to attend the inheritance. The farm, then consisting of 60 
acres, passed to Gregory Copinger in the same deed as the Cockerells Hall Estate 
from William Vesey April 20, 17 10. It was also comprised in a certain deed of 
April 3, 1733, made between Gregory Copinger the son of the ist part, John 
Powell of the 2nd part, and John Coles of the 3rd part, and a deed of May 12, 
1743, made between Gregory Copinger the son and Sarah his wife and Sarah 
Copinger, spinster, his only child and heir apparent, of the one part, and John 
Kerrick of the other part; an indenture of Nov. 8, 1745, made between Sarah 
Copinger the elder (then the widow of Gregory Copinger the son) and Sarah 
Copinger the younger of the ist part, Thomas Moyle of the 2nd part, John Wearg 
and the Rev. Thomas Smith of the 3rd part, and Thomas de Grey and Edward 
Isaac Jackson of the 4th part (being the settlement made on the marriage of 
Thomas Moyle and Sarah Copinger the younger) ; an indenture dated Jan. 3, 
1769, made between Sarah Copinger the elder and Thomas Copinger Moyle (only 
son and heir of Thomas Moyle and Sarah Copinger, both deceased) of the ist part, 
James Geldard of the 2nd part, and Thomas Chapman of the 3rd part ; a 
recovery and a release of May 26, 1772, between Thomas Moyle of the one part 
and Thomas Garner of the other part, this last deed being the sale of the property 
to Garner. The trustees of Thomas Garner's will sold Gunnells or Waspe Hall and 
the three tenements. Barons, Southgates, and Brownes, by deed of October 22, 
1806, to Thomas Stearn, his title being confirmed by indenture of Oct. 19, 
1 8 14, doubts having been entertained as to the sufficiency of the deed of 1806 to 
pass two estates of 60 acres each, i.e., 120 acres. The objection to the Stearn title 
was evidently raised on behalf of the Rev. Henry Hill on his purchase from 
Thomas Stearn in 18 14 of a portion of the property comprised in the con- 
veyance of 1806. This portion was Brownes or Salters and 10 acres (four of 
which were copyhold of the Manor of Buxhall), which were conveyed to Mr. 
Hill by deed of Oct. 27, 18 14, and now form part of the Valley farm. The 



2 20 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

rest of this property is still in the possession of the descendants of Thomas 
Stearn. 

A considerable portion of the property sold by Garner's trustees to Stearn 
(including the tenement Brownes) formerly belonged to William Copinger and Mary 
Copinger, and from them passed to Sarah Copinger the elder. Henry Howe and 
Zachariah Bowie occupied as tenants until about the year 1768, when Daniel Javers 
entered into the occupation and held as tenant until 1790, when - Thomas Stearn 
took possession as tenant till 1806, the date of his purchase as above. 

This farm now includes an ancient free holding of the Manor of Buxhall and 
also some copyholds. The free holding was known as Taylor's Croft, and in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth was described as : — 

" One croft called Taylor's Croft lying in Buxhall containing i acre and 3 rod 
lying between a way leading from Buxhall to Rattlesden and land of the Manor 
of Buxhall one head abutting on land of Francis Bacon gent, called Skondons 
Meadow and a tenement of the Manor of Buxhall called Cateskots and the other 
head abutting on land of the said Manor." 

It was held in the time of Queen Mary at the rent of vj'' by John Smythe, 
who sold to John Salter, jun., son of John Salter, sen., who did fealty Sept. 30, 
9 Eliz. On April 14, 1645, Mark Salter, who had taken as son and heir of his 
father, Mark Salter, did fealty and paid the relief. 

The copyhold portion was known as Barons, an ancient house of this name, 
having stood on the easterly side of Baron's Lane and at its junction with the high- 
road leading from Buxhall to Rattlesden, a site now occupied by the barns of the 
Hollybush farm. This house was burnt down many years ago. The description of 
this copyhold property (including a part of Millfield) in the time of Philip and 
Mary is as follows : — 

One "tenement and 4 pieces of land meadow and pasture containing 21 acres 
one piece containing by estimation 6 acres of land and lying betv/een a certain way 
called Barons Lane on one side and land anciently called Hills on the other side. 
The second piece containing by estimation 7 acres of land and meadow and lying 
between the way called Baronslane on the one part and a croft called Taylor's 
Croft on the other part. The 3rd piece containing by estimation with hedge and 
ditch 5 acres late parcel of a certain field called Melfeld. The 4th piece containing 
by estimation 3 acres part of the said field called Melfeld." 

Edward Salter had this and died before July 22, 2 Phil, and Mary, and John 
Salter, his only son and heir, was then but nine years of age, and Thomas Cuttinge 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 22 1 

and Margaret his wife were admitted as guardians during minority. Margaret was 
his mother. John Salter the son was admitted i Eliz., the description then 
being : — 

" One tenement called Barons containing 2 acres and a half in Buxhall 
lying between land of the Manor of Buxhall on the one side and the road 
called Baronslane on the other side one head abutting on land of the said 
Manor called Gravell pittes and the other head on the street leading to Rattlesden 
and one other piece of land bond containing 7 acres called Gravel pittes [42 Eliz., 
6 acres] lying in Buxhall between the way called Baronslane and Longstrete 
[42 Eliz., street called Longe street] on one side and lands of George Salter 
[42 Eliz., Thomas Marten] called Hills on the other side one head abutting 
on land of the Manor of Fenhalle and the other on land of the Manor of Buxhall 
And 4 acres and a half lying in Buxhall between land of Richard Collen [42 Eliz., 
John Salter] called Taylors Croft on the one side and land of George Salter [42 Eliz., 
Thomas Marten] on the other side one head abutting on land of the Manor of 
Buxhall and the other on a meadow late of Francis Bakon gent. [42 Eliz., late 
Francis Bacon, then of Richard Marten] called Skondons Meadow And one piece 
containing ^ an acre in Buxhall between land of the Manor of Fenhall on one side 
and the meadow late of Francis Bacon gent, called Skondons Meadow in part and 
land of George Salter [42 Eliz., Thomas Martin] on the other side one head abutting 
on land of the said George Salter [42 Eliz., Thomas Marten] called Hills and the 
other head on land of the Manor of Buxhall. Rent vii". And also 2 pieces of land 
parcel of Mellefelde containing 8 acres in Buxhall between land of the Manor of 
Buxhall on the one side and lands of the Manor of Cockerells called Bloks [42 Eliz., 
Blocks ; I Car. I., Bleakes] on the other side one head abutting on land of the sd. 
Manor of Cokerells called Chypelfilde [42 Eliz., Claypytt feilde] and the other head 
abutting on the way leading to Ratellesden. Rent viij' iiij''-." The above together 
make 22 J acres, that is ij acres more than Thomas Cuttinge and Margaret his wife 
had been admitted to, 2 Phil, and Mary, so the guardianship had been productive 
of benefit to little Salter. 

Edward Salter surrendered all the above by the last description, as altered 
between brackets, to the use of Simons Maye conditionally, and he was admitted 
March 13, 42 Eliz. 

As at a Court held Dec. 9, 43 Eliz., it was presented that a certain piece 
of land, containing by estimation 8 acres, formerly parcel of a field called Millfeild, 
lying in Buxhall, then in the tenure or occupation of Simon Maye, was of antient 



222 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

time parcel of land demesne of the said Manor and first newly granted out of the 
hand of the lord by Walter Copinger, gent., late lord of the Manor, he having 
but an estate for life in the Manor, to Richard Tenvinter and Joan his wife, 
lo Hen. VIII., Sept. 30, the estate was confirmed to Simon Maye Oct. 2, 3 Jac. I. 
Simon surrendered all his lands in the whole 22 acres, as to Gravell Pyttes, 6 acres 
to the use of Joan his wife and her heirs, and as to the remaining 16 acres to 
the use of himself and Joan his wife, with remainder to the use of the heirs 
of Simon, and Simon and Joan his wife were the same day admitted, and Dec. 13, 
14 Jac. I., surrendered Gravell Pyttes, containing 6 acres, to the use of themselves 
for life, and Simon by his will. May 11, 19 Jac. I., devised to John Maye his 
kinsman, the son of John Maye his brother, all his messuage and tenement called 
Barons, wherein he then dwelt, and all his lands, meadows, pastures, feedings, and 
grounds thereunto, lying in Buxhall, being all copyhold to hold immediately after 
the death of Joan his wife. John was admitted to the remainder April 29, 
I Car. I., and sold it to John Bedall, who was admitted at the same court, 
and he sold to William Carpenter, who was admitted April 5, 1638. The admit- 
tance, however, is to all except Gravell Pyttes. William Carpenter by his will, 
Oct. 24, 1652, devised his property to his son WilHam, who was admitted 
April 13, 1653, to all except Gravell Pyttes. Notwithstanding this, William the son 
purports to surrender conditionally to Robert Moore, a mortgagee, March 17, 1669, 
the whole of the property, including Gravell Pyttes, yet strangely the surrender omits 
the 8 acres, part of Millfield. On the sale, however, Oct. 18, 1698, the error 
is corrected, for Gravell Pyttes is omitted and Millfield 8 acres included. This sale 
was made to Robert Burland for life with remainder to his son Robert Burland, 
who sold the estate to Gregory Copinger, of Cockerells Hall, who was admitted 
Sept. 3, 171 1. Gregory by will, Dec. 22, 1739, devised to his daughter Sarah 
all his copyhold messuages, lands, and tenements in Buxhall, and she was 
admitted Jan. 14, 1744. Sarah married Thomas Moyle, Esq., and their son, 
Thomas Copinger Moyle, an infant of eighteen, was admitted April 8, 1765. 
Thomas Copinger Moyle sold to Thomas Garner all the above. May 26, 1772, and 
he was admitted June 15, 1772, and by will, Jan. 9, 1800, devised to executors in 
trust for sale, and -Thomas Fox as executor and trustee was admitted Aug. 26, 
1803, and sold to Thomas Stearn, who was admitted April 7, 1808. On his death 
his only son and heir, Thomas Stearn of Buxhall, farmer, was admitted Oct. 2, 
1827, and he enfranchised Sept. 10, 1864. 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 223 

(/) The Park Farm. 

This farm has always formed part of the Buxhall estate of the Copingers. It 
was formerly known by the name of Hardhols or Hardheads, and in 1647 was in 
the occupation of Henry Reynolds. In 1681 it consisted of 92 acres and was then 
in the occupation of John Pilborowe. In 1689 it was in the occupation of Gregory 
Copinger of Cockerells Hall, but in 1709 it had been given up by him. In 1763 it 
was known as Frosts and was then in the occupation of Mr. Bendai. In 1809 it 
was in the occupation of William Kemble, and is now in the occupation of Mr. Alen 
as tenant of the writer. This property was included in the conveyance by Goodday 
of the 5th of July, 1709, with the Manor of Buxhall as already mentioned. 

There are three ponds of considerable extent on this farm, each on a different 
level and no doubt originally used for the rearing of fish. The house is of great 
age, many of the rooms being panelled. It stands on rising ground in a good 
position and looks down upon Fasbourn Hall. The high road on two sides forms 
the boundary, and on another side the farm is bounded by Cogman's Lane. Both 
the house and the farm buildings, which are extensive, have been recently put in 
thorough repair. 

(k) The Butterfly 

Strictly speaking, an account of this tenement has no place in the present volume, 
for the house itself actually stands in the parish of Great Finborough, but the 
greater part of the land held with the tenement is in the parish of Buxhall, and 
the lands of the two parishes are hereabouts somewhat interwoven so that it is thought 
that a brief account of this ancient and interesting edifice may not prove unacceptable. 

The house is built of brick and plaster and tiled. All the timber and floors 
are of fine old oak and the staircase, also of oak, is an exceedingly good type of 
old farmhouse work. It was formerly known as Wards, no doubt after a John 
Warde of Woolpit, who held land in the immediate neighbourhood, 27 Hen. VIII., 
and at one time or another seems to have lived here. The road from the Hitcham 
highroad passing the Stone Farm, in early days no doubt went up to the Butterfly, 
and in ancient documents is described as " the way to a tenement called Wardes " 
[21 Jac. I.] and later as "the way leading to a tenement belonging to Sir Roger 
North." In more modern times the house was known as Boggasis, then as Coopers, 
and has now settled down to the " Butterfly." It is well situated on the top 
of the hill, part of the land bordering on Cogman's Lane, and the view from 
the house is exceptionally fine and extensive. In recent years it has been occupied as 



2 24 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

two tenements, but is now reconverted into one. It is probably the house men- 
tioned in the will of William Copinger, Sept. 3, 1436, which he devised to his 
brother John Copinger under the description of " a tenement called Cordes in 
Finborough Magna." 

In the middle of the seventeenth century the freehold occupied with the house 
and being in Great Finborough belonged to John Ransford of that place, whose son 
and heir, Thomas Ransford, of Bury St. Edmunds, conveyed the same by deed dated 
the 27th of Dec, 168 1, to Richard Helmes in trust for Richard Short, who with 
Richard Helmes and Mary his wife, Robert Helmes the trustee and Jane his wife, 
conveyed the same by deed of the 5th of Dec, 1704, to John Boggas. Seven acres 
of this farm which are copyhold are mixed with seven acres which are freehold, and 
this latter portion did not come from the Ransford but from the Durrants ; for it 
was acquired by deed of the 15th of June, 1697, by Richard Helmes in trust for 
Richard Short from John Durrant the elder, of Great Finborough, yeoman, and John 
Durrant the younger, cooper, his eldest son, and Robert Sparhawke, of Mendlesham, 
yeoman. 

John Boggas, who purchased the freehold as above mentioned, certainly had the 
Butterfly tenement itself, which is copyhold of the Manor of Finborough, with Cant- 
low and Addershall, for he left it by his will to his nephew, Edward Boggas the 
elder, who lived at Weeley, in the county of Essex. In 1739, on the marriage of 
Mary Boggas, his daughter, with Thomas Everard, of Brightlinsea, in Essex, he 
conveyed the freehold and covenanted to surrender the copyhold by deed of the 
1 6th of Dec, 1739,' to his son Edward Boggas and Robert Everard, as trustees for 
Thomas Everard and his wife and the survivor, with remainder to the use of the 
heirs of their bodies as Thomas Everard should by will appoint, with remainder to 
Edward Boggas the elder in fee. Thomas Everard by will dated the 23rd of Nov., 
1755, left his property, after the death of his wife, to his son John in fee, and both 
wife and son were admitted to the copyholds Jan. 9, 1772, on the surrender 
of Edward Boggas, who had been admitted as heir-at-law of his father for the 
purpose of making such surrender. The copyhold part to which admittance was 
granted consisted of 20a. 2r. 

Upon the death of Mary Everard and John Everard, the property passed in 
moieties to the two sisters of the last named — that is, to Mary, the wife of the 
Rev. Thomas Warburton, and to Elizabeth Everard, who were admitted to the 
copyhold portion the 26th of June, 1786. Mary Warburton died in 1802 and her 

■ The surrender was actually made the uth of June, 1756. 















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Houses of Interest in the Parish 225 

son, the Rev. William Philip Warburton, who was admitted 30th of April, 1803, 
by his will of the 31st of Dec, 1818, in which he is described as of Lydd in 
Kent, left his Suffolk property to his wife Elizabeth for life, and afterwards to his 
daughter Elizabeth Mary Moore Cobb Warburton in fee. As Elizabeth Everard 
left, by her will of the 20th of April, 1840, her moiety to her great niece, the first 
moiety to which she had been admitted 26th of July, 1824, became united to the 
other moiety to which she was admitted the loth of July, 1841. Elizabeth War- 
burton and her niece sold the estate in 1845 to the late Copinger Hill, who was 
admitted to the copyhold portion the 13th of Jan., 1845. The property, both free- 
hold and copyhold, is now vested in the writer, who has recently restored the old 
edifice. 

A piece of land of 9 acres and a house standing on it, known as Cogmans, 
probably forming part of this farm but not absolutely identified, was copyhold in 
the time of Queen Mary, and was the inheritance of Robert Martyn. He sold to 
Robert Warren and Elizabeth his wife, who were admitted Oct. 8, 4 and 5 
Phil, and Mary. Elizabeth died, and Robert Warren surrendered April 10, 
2 Eliz., to Henry Copinger, the then lord of the Manor, when of course as 
copyhold Cogmans cease to exist. The tenement has long since disappeared, but it 
is clear that it stood on the Butterfly side of Cogman's Lane. 

(/) Kennetts. 

The description, 2 Eliz., was : " One tenement called Kenetts containing i acre 
and J pasture lying between land of the Manor of Buxhall and the road called 
Churchstreet one head abutting on land," etc. It was copyhold of the Manor of 
Buxhall. The property being in the busiest part of the village considerably changed 
its character shortly after the time of James I., and we find in 1630 the description 
was : — 

" All that messuage or tenement with the appurtenances late in the occupation 
of Edward Jacob being parcel of the tenement called Cannetts or Kennetts (now 
divided into 2 tenements under one roof, one in the occupation of Thomas 
Hatchett and the other in the occupation of Edward Jacob with one acre and an 
orchard adjoining lying in Buxhall on the Highway there called Church Street 
toward the east and a pightile of land of John Salter towards the west, one head 
abutting on a curtilage of the Rectory of Buxhall towards the south and the 
other abutting on a tenement of Daniel Richer towards the north with a right 
of way over the pightile of John Salter and of water." 

30 



226 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

This property in Queen Mary's time belonged to John Rycher, who was 
admitted Sept. 30, 6 Mary, and April 16, 2 Ellz., sold to Richard Mare, 
who sold to John Salter (son and heir of John Salter, sen.), who was admitted, 
Sept. 30, 2 Eliz., and before June i, 22 Eliz., sold to Edmund Studd, 
who was admitted on that day. Edmund Studd, April 17, 6 Jac. I., surrendered 
to his son John Studd, who was admitted Sept. 30, 6 Jac. I. John Studd 
sold to Thomas Hatchett, Oct. 6, 1631, who, with his wife Diana, were 
admitted same day. These parties divided the property, selling one tenement 
to Edward Jacob, April 15, 1635, to which he was admitted Oct. 6, 7 Car. I. 
The other tenement was sold to the same person, April 15, 11 Car. I. Edward 
Jacob, by will, June 8, 1639, left the property to his wife Sarah for life, and 
afterwards to his son Thomas Jacob. Sarah was admitted Oct. 9, 15 Car. I., 
and Thomas the son April 4, 1643. The last Thomas having died, his son 
Thomas Jacob was admitted, Nov. 2, 1692. The ij acres then became divided 
amongst several tenements, three of which, and Barkers (also containing ij), 
Thomas Poole had on the surrender of Simon Jacob and Henry Crouth and 
Sarah his wife, at a court, Feb. 5, 1740, and sold, July i, 1767, to Henry Hill 
the younger absolutely, and he was admitted May 30, 1768. 

Another cottage (late a Pot Ash Office) was surrendered by John Brett to 
William Purcas, who was admitted, Nov. 14, 1701, and on his death his son, 
Israel Purcas, was admitted Oct. 22, 17 14, and his son Israel Purcas, May 6, 
1723, who, June 27, 1743, sold to Thomas Ship, of Buxhall, " Innholder," who 
was admitted, August 8, 1743, and April 16, 1766, sold to James Purr, of 
Buxhall, smith, and Mary Eleanor his wife, who were admitted. May 30, 1766, 
and sold to the Rev. Henry Hill, then lord of the Manor, May 28, 1789. 
The occupants were then William Spink, wheelwright, and William Thorowgood, 
labourer, and of the Pot Ash Office — Edward Pearl, weaver. The rest of Kennetts 
(from the description of the land those tenements nearest to the Rectory ground, 
but from the description of what stood on It those furthest away to the north) 
was surrendered, Sept. 2, 1742, by Simon Jacob to Martha Jacob, who was 
admitted, April 14, 1744, and by Simon and his wife sold April 5, 1758, to James 
Purr, who was admitted. May 26, 1758. On his death his only son and heir, 
James Purr, was admitted. May 27, 1806, and he, by will, appointed his son, 
James Purr, of Buxhall, blacksmith, and his daughter Emily Knevett, executors 
and trustees, and directed them to sell. Emily renounced and disclaimed, and 
James, the son, was admitted, Sept. 3, 1867, and Oct. 11, 1870, sold to the 



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Houses of Interest in the Parish 227 

Rev. Henry Hill, then lord of the manor, with the additional description, " and 
do now consist of a Blacksmith's shop house cottages and premises in the several 
occupations of Harding and two others." 

Thus the whole of the above premises are now vested in the lord. 

{m) Barkers. 

One tenement, customary and heriotable, called Barkers, containing one acre and 
half, formerly a parcel of the land [in 1616 this addition: "lying in the Church 
Strete in Buxhall aforesaid] called the Launde, lying in Buxhall between land of 
the Manor of Buxhall on both parts, one head abutting on the Church Street, and 
the other on land of the Manor of Buxhall, and also one other tenement customary 
with an orchard and meadow adjoining, situate in Buxhall. Rent 3s. 8d. as appears 
in Roll, April 2, 17 Jac. I." 

It was found, Dec. 9, 43 Eliz., that the above " not being ancient 
customary land of the lord of the Manor demised or demisable by Court Rolls 
of the Manor at the will or the lord, according to the custom of the Manor 
from time immemorial, but first granted by one Walter Copinger, gent., lord of 
this manor, at a court held Oct. 9, 12 Hen. VIII., to a certain Richard 
Revell and his heirs, to hold to the said Richard Revell and his heirs of the lord 
by Court Roll of this Manor at the will of the lord, according to the custom of 
the said Manor, at the yearly rent of iij'' viij*, and by heriot and other services 
the said Walter's then estate and interest to and in the manor and lands, was for 
term of life and not otherwise." Richard Revel, 20 Hen. VIII., surrendered to 
John Salter, and his widow Agnes Salter, Sept. 30, 2 Eliz., sold to John Bridgge, 
who was on the same day admitted. He on Sept 30, 1608, surrendered to 
George Dickenson, clerk, by way of mortgage. George Dickenson, on May 17, 16 16, 
surrendered conditionally to Ambrose Copinger, gent., one of the sons of Henry 
Copinger, lord of the Manor, and also later on March 22, 161 8, absolutely 
surrendered to Ambrose Copinger, who was admitted, April 2, 1619. On July 18, 
1620, Ambrose Copinger surrendered to Brigitt Kemboulde, spinster, who was 
admitted the same day. Brigitt married Peter Cranford, of Waterbelchampe, Essex, 
and together they sold to Anne Deresley, daughter of Thomas Deresley, of 
Foxhearth, who, being under age, was committed to the guardianship of her father, 
who paid the fine. Anne Dearsley, Oct. 18, 1637, sold to Henry Barton, who 
was admitted April 5, 1638, and sold, Oct. 9, 1639, to Richard Crosse, who 
was on that day admitted. He surrendered conditionally on Nov. 3, 1652, 



328 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

to Thomas Hovell, otherwise Smyth, of Great Ashfield, gent, who was admitted 
April 1 6, 1655, and Feb. 5, 21 Car. II., sold to Henry Cozens, who was 
admitted April 5, 1670. Henry Cozens, by his will, Oct. 26, 1672, left the 
property to his son, Henry Cozens, who was admitted May 16, 1673, and sold 
to Thomas Jacob. Thomas Jacob devised to his son, Thomas Jacob, who was 
admitted July 26, i Will, and Mary, and by will dated April 26, 1695, left the 
same to Sarah his wife for life, for the bringing up of his six youngest children, 
and she was admitted Nov. 20, 1696. The gift in the will subject to Sarah's life 
interest was to the children, who were Simon and Sarah, for we find that at a court, 
Feb. 5, 1740, Simon, Jacob, and Henry Crouth, and Sarah his wife, surrendered 
to Thomas Poole with the property known as Kennettes, who, July i, 1767, 
surrendered to Henry Hill the younger, of Buxhall absolutely, and he was admitted 
May 30, 1768. The property now forms part of the Buxhall Estate. 

(«) Fryers. 

Description 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary: "One cottage with garden to the same 
parcel of the tenement Fryers with the appurtenances in Buxhall, late of Edward 
Ellis, containing by estimation one rod, and lying between the highway called 
Church Street on the one part, and land of the Manor of Buxhall on the other 
part, both heads abutting on lands of the manor aforesaid, held by vii'* rent per 
annum, which Henry Recher had after the death of Martin Recher, his father, in 
the 35th year of Hen. VIII." 

Description /. Car. I. : "One cottage and one orchard, customary and heriotable, 
with a small pond in the said orchard, formerly parcel of a tenement called Fryers, 
lying in Buxhall between the highway called Church Street on the east, and land, 
late of John Salter, on the west, one head abutting on land late of the said John 
Salter, towards the north, and the other head on orchard late of Edward Studd, 
towards the south. Rent vij''." 

Martin Recher had the above in the time of Henry VIII., and on his death 
his son Henry Recher was admitted 35 Hen. VIII. Henry Recher died, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Richard Recher, who was admitted Sept. 30, 
2 and 3 Phil, and Mary. Daniel Recher, Oct. 8, 20 Eliz., surrendered to Henry 
Richer (sic), who surrendered to his brother Daniel Richer, who was admitted 
April 13, 22 Eliz. Daniel Richer, son of Daniel Richer, was admitted to 
above (and another piece) April 29, i Car. I., and surrendered the above only to 
Thomas Crosse, of Buxhall, who was admitted April 22, 2 Car. I. Thomas 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 229 

Crosse, July 19, 1637, surrendered to Elizabeth his wife, who was admitted 
April 5, 1638, and together they surrendered to Henry Barton, who was admitted, 
and who, April 5, 14 Car. I., surrendered conditionally to Thomas Crosse and 
Elizabeth his wife, and the heirs of Thomas, and both Thomas and his wife 
were admitted April 25, 1639, and at same court sold to Abraham Rudland, 
who was at the same time admitted. Abraham Rudland, by his will, Jan. 23, 
1650, devised "his tenement in Buxhall, where William Sanders dwelt," to his 
granddaughter, Martha Rudland, who was admitted April 24, 1660. She 
married Benjamin Brett, and surrendered in, 1670, to self and husband for life, 
with remainder to use of the heirs of the said Martha, and Benjamin Brett, 
the husband, was admitted August 15, 1670. On the death of Benjamin and 
Martha, the son and heir, Benjamin Brett, was admitted Nov. 2, 1692, and 
on his death John Brett was admitted Nov. 20, 1696, and he, Nov. 24, 1696, 
surrendered to William Purcas, of Finborough, the house then being in the 
occupation of Thomas Parker, and Wm. Purcas was admitted Nov. 14, 1701. John 
Brett, July 9, 1697, surrendered all his lands to use of said John and Elizabeth 
his wife during life, and then to his son, John Brett. There seems to have been 
certain claimants under Benjamin or John Brett, for Feb. 7, 1717, there was 
a release from Robert Taylor and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heir of John 
Brett, in respect of what Samuel Purcas had been admitted to, Dec. 17, 1706, 
on surrender of John Brett and Elizabeth his wife, and again Feb. 8, 1717, 
by Benjamin Brett. Rosa Baldry was admitted August 16, 1725, and she and 
her husband, John Baldry, of Darmsden, yeoman, sold, July 15, 1731, to Judith 
Leaver, of Bury St. Edmunds, spinster, who was admitted Sept. 6, 1731. 
Judith married John Mayer, and he was admitted Nov. 21, 1738, and sold to 
Thomas Poole, of Buxhall, yeoman, May 26, 1758, and he, Jan. 26, 1769, 
sold to the Rev. Henry Hill, then lord of the Manor, absolutely, as is 
recorded, in a court held August 16, 1770. Fryers still forms part of the Buxhall 
Estate. 

(0) Farthings and Cleves. 
" Two messuages and one curtelage to the same belonging, called Farthings and 
Cleves, containing in the whole 3 rods and 10 p., bond and heriotable, with the 
appurtenances lying in Buxhall, between the highway called Church street on the 
north, and land of the Manor on the south, one head abutting on the said Manor 
of Buxhall [in the tenure of Agnes Salter] on the part of the west, the other 



230 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

head on the said street on the part of the east, and one piece of meadow bond and 
heriotable, containing i acre, lying in Buxhall, between land of the Manor on all 
sides, one head abutting on land of the Rectory of Buxhall on the south, and the 
other head on the said messuages called Farthings and Cleves, on the north," at rent 
of ij', part of a rent of iiij' payable out of this and the said premises of 
John Studd. 

Ehzabeth Cage was seised of Farthings and Cleves only, not the acre of land, 
for life, with remainder to Robert Cage. Robert Cage sold the reversion to John 
Southwell and Francis Sone, Esquires, who before surrender sold to Francis Bacon, 
gent. No one came to be admitted and the lord seised, and July 22, 2 Mary, 
granted same out of hand to the said Francis Bacon, rent iij' ij''. Francis Bacon, 
gent., surrendered to John Richar, Sept. 30, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, and 
he surrendered Oct. 2, 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary, to Richard Richer who died 
before Oct. i, 7 Eliz., as on this day John Richer, his son and heir, was 
admitted. He sold to John Salter, son of John Salter, sen., who was admitted 
Sept. 30, II Eliz. (? rent 3s. 2d.) John Salter surrendered Sept. 30, 5 Jac. I., 
to his son and heir, John Salter, who was admitted the same day. One tenement 
now occupies the site of Farthing and Cleves, and till recently was used as the 
Parish Room. It is part of the Buxhall Estate. 

(p) Mill Cottages. 
Collage on Wasle Mill Green. 

" A cottage newly built by John Wade on the waste of the lord, with a garden 
to the same adjoining, containing, by estimation, one rod of land, lying and being 
in a certain way called Mill Street, in Buxhall, and now in the occupation of the 
said John Wade, and separate from the rest of the waste of the lord by a certain 
hedge and ditch, to hold to the said John Wade, his heirs and assigns, at the will 
of the lord, and according to the custom of the Manor aforesaid, at the rent of 2s. 
per annum, fealty and suit of court." 

Granted to John Wade and his heirs, April 15, 1635. On his death John 
Wade, his eldest son and heir, was admitted May i, 1657, and he, Oct. 7, 1658, sold 
to Helen Wood, spinster, who was admitted April 4, 1659. Probably to this, 
under the description of " one tenement formerly part of the waste of the lord ot 
the Manor with an orchard containing i rod," Margaret Strange was admitted for 
life, April 22, 1685, and on her death her son and heir, William Strange, admitted 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 231 

Oct. 18, 1698. Robert Strange was admitted Oct. 6, 1740, and sold to William 
Lambert, of Rattlesden, July 26, 1746, and he was admitted July 21, 1749. 
William Lambert by will, Feb. 22, 1770, gave to his son John the messuage 
in which he dwelt in Buxhall, and John Lambert was admitted August 16, 1770. He, 
by will, March 14, 1794, gave the property to Hannah his wife, under the description 
of " all that his messuage or tenement wherein he then dwelt " for life, and after 
her decease to his daughter Hannah for life, with remainder to William Borley her 
son, if he survived her, and if he died in his mother's lifetime to John Borley, 
second son of testator's daughter Hannah. Hannah, the widow of John Lambert, 
being dead, Hannah Borley was admitted Sept. 21, 1813, and William Borley, 
the devisee in remainder, was admitted on the death of his mother, Oct 2, 1827, 
and Feb. 15, 1868, sold to Jacob Green, of Stowmarket, yeoman, who was 
admitted March 24, 1S68, and Jan. 7, 1873, surrendered to John William 
Rouse, of Ipswich, in trust for the Rev. Henry Hill, then lord of the Manor, the 
description then being, " All those four cottages or dwelling-houses situate in 

Buxhall, now or late in the several occupations of Dykes, Widow Parr 

Clarke and Smith with their respective yards gardens lands tenements rights 

licenses easements and appurtenances." 

Two of the cottages were pulled down and the two now standing are in the 
occupation of Walter Clarke and Buxton, and form part of the Buxhall Estate. 

{q) Browns. 

" One tenement, customary and heriotable, called Browns, and 4 acres meadowe 
and pasture, lying in Buxhall, between land late of Edward Salter and land of this 
Manor, one head abutting on land of the said Edward Salter and the other on 
Broad brook Street." 

In a court held Sept. 30, 16 Hen. VII., one tenement called " Browys," 
lying in Buxhall, late of Peter Nele, was granted by deed to Isabella Glan- 
vyle. She having been dead some years, in the i Edw. VI., John Glanvyle sold 
the property to William Childe, he paying to John Glanvyle 20s. a year for ten 
years, and allowing him to inhabit during life one chamber in the westerly part of 
the house, with full entrance and exit, and to. take a moiety of the fruit of the 
garden and orchard. Under these conditions William Childe was admitted. He 
died before Sept. 30, i Eliz., and Daniel Child, his heir-at-law, being an 
infant of ten years, his guardianship was committed to his mother Dorothy. 
Jan. 10, 3 Jac. I., Daniel Child surrendered to the use of his will. By the will. 



232 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

dated Nov. 23, 21 Jac. I., he gave to Jane Rushe, his kinswoman, the wife 
of Edward Rushe, of Buxhall, his " copyhold tenement called Brownes, and 4 acres 
of meadow and pasture " for life, with remainder to Edward Rushe, son of the said 
Edward Rushe, and Mary Rushe, daughter of the said Edward, and their heirs for 
ever. Jane and Edward were admitted March 24, 22 Jac. I. Jane died before 
March 14, 1627, and Mary married John Woodruffe. Edward Rushe and John 
WoodrufFe and Mary his wife were admitted April 16, 1628, and they sold 
Nov. 8, 1630, to Edmund Murton and Elizabeth his wife for life, with 
remainder to Edmund the heir of the said Edmund, and they were admitted same day, 
and on April 20, 1632, surrendered to the use of the said Edmund Murton and 
Elizabeth his wife for life, with remainder to William Copinger, second son of the 
lord, and these were admitted April 23, 1634. At a court held May i, 1641, it 
was found that Edmund Murton had died, and Elizabeth held for life. William 
Copinger, who was then in possession, surrendered to use of himself and Mary his 
wife for life, and after the death of the survivor to the right heirs of William. 
Mary his widow was admitted Nov. 14, 1701, and the same day surrendered 
to Gregory Copinger, of Cockerells Hall, younger son of the said Mary, who was 
admitted at the same time. Gregory Copinger, May 23, 1709, surrendered to such 
use as Margaret Copinger, widow of William Copinger, clerk, deceased, brother of 
Gregory, might appoint, and in default to her and her heirs. Margaret by will 
August 2, 1 710, directed the property to be sold by her executors, her brothers 
Samuel Cracherode and Charles Cracherode, and Gregory Copinger, and the 
proceeds to be divided amongst her children. Under a certain deed of March 2, 
171 1, Gregory Copinger seems to have become absolute owner, for on Sept. 3, 
171 1, he was admitted, and by will, Dec. 22 1739, devised to his daughter 
Sarah Copinger, who was admitted Jan. 14, 1744. Sarah married Thomas 
Moyle, Esq., and their son Thomas Copinger Moyle, was admitted April 8, 1765, 
and sold May 26, 1772, to Thomas Garner, who was admitted June 15, 1772. He 
by will of Jan., 1800, devised to his executors in trust to sell, and Thomas 
Fox, one of the executors and trustees, having been admitted August 26, 1803, 
sold to Thomas Stearn, who was admitted April 7, 1808. Thomas Stearn, Oct. 
27, 1814, surrendered to the Rev. Henry Hill, then lord of the Manor, and the 
surrender is recorded in the court held May 4, 18 16. Browns now forms part of 
the Buxhall Estate, and on its site stand two cottages, known as the Valley 
Cottages from being opposite to this farm. 



Houses of Interest in the Parish 233 

(r) RUDLANDS. 

This is a dwelling in Broadbrook Street, situate between the Valley and Coles 
Farms. The identity will be made clear by the two following descriptions, one of 
the dwellinghouse with the land then held with it in early times, the other in the year 
1758. "One croft of land containing 3^ acres lying in Buxhall on the south side 
bounded by a messuage formerly of Richard Ellys late of John Studd and abutting 
on the highway leading to Fasbornes from the Church of Buxhall towards the east 
and one orchard or pightile of pasture containing half an acre [called Fundlings 
Pightill, containing 3 rods] lying on the north part of the said messuage. Rent 4s." 
Description in 1758 : "All those 2 closes or pieces of land copyhold and heriotable 
lying in Buxhall between the Highway south east and the lands of Henry Hill 
clerk north west abutting upon the lands of the Lady of the Manor in part and 
the messuage and orchard [containing 3 rods] in part north east and the lands 
of the said Henry Hill south west containing by estimation 4 acres with the 
appurtenances And one Cottage with the orchard belonging situate between the 
Highway leading from Fashbornes Hall to Buxhall Church south east and the lands 
of the lady of the said Manor north west abutting upon the lands of the lady of 
the said Manor north east and the lands [containing 4 acres] south west 
containing by estimation 3 rods." 

It appears that the above was granted by Walter Copinger, then lord of the 
Manor, at a court held Thursday next, after the feast of Saint Leonard, 19 
Hen. VIIL, to one Andreas Ellyce and Joan his wife, and their heirs, at the 
rent of iiij'., to hold as ordinary copyhold land. At the time Walter Copinger 
had only an estate for life in the Manor. At a court held Dec. 9, 43 
Eliz., these facts were found, and that the lands were not anciently held by 
Court Rolls, nor were they demised or demisable from time immemorial, and that 
one Thomas Rixbye had under colour and pretext of certain surrenders and 
admissions possession of the land. Under these circumstances at a court held 
March 29, i James I., Francis Copinger, the then lord, being seised in fee of 
the Manor, purported to confirm the original grant, but how he could get over 
the objection that the land was not " anciently customary land of the Manor 
demised or demisable by copy of Court Rolls from time whereof the memory of 
man runneth not to the contrary" — the legal phrase for the time of Richard I.— 
does not appear. Richard Ellyce had been admitted June i, 22 Eliz., on the 
death of his mother Joan, the original grantee, and he had surrendered to 
Thomas Rixbye, who had been admitted August 28, 40 Eliz. On Sept. 

31 



234 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



30, 6 Jac, Thomas Rixbye, jun., sold to John Studd, and he was admitted. 
On John Studd's death Anna, wife of Henry Syer, Katherine Studd, and Mary 
Studd, his three daughters and co-heiresses, were admitted April 20, 1632. 
These surrendered conditionally to Abraham Rudland, who was admitted May 25, 
1632, and he by will, Jan. 22, 1650, devised to Margaret Rudland, his 
daughter, the property by the description of the tenement and lands wherein he then 
dwelt, and she was admitted April 29, 1660. 

Andreas Rudland and Anna his wife, Oct. 27, 1699, sold to William 
Badcock, of Ringshall, who was admitted Nov. 14, 1701. He died leaving his 
only sister Mary his heiress, but she took under his will, and on her death 
Elizabeth Porter was admitted Nov. 11, 1728, and she sold Sept. 27, 1748, to 
John Edgar, of Great Finborough, gent., who was admitted July 21, 1749. 
Rudlands now forms part of the Buxhall Estate. 





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CHAPTER VIII 

Early Wills with Extracts so far as they Relate to Land 
in the Parish and have not been previously given 

Translation of Will of John Copinger, 1 44 1 . 

IN the name of God, Amen. I, John Copenger of Buxhale, being of sound mind 
and perfect memory, this 19th day of July, 1441, make my Will in this way. 

In the first place I bequeath my soul to Almighty God, the Blessed Virgin 
Mary, and to all the saints, and my body to be buried in the Church of Buxhall 
aforesaid. Item, I bequeath to the high altar of the same Church for my tithes 
forgotten or too Httle paid and for the health of my soul iijs. iiijd., together with 
all the money to be found in the gilt vessel in the said house. Item, I appoint to be 
distributed among the poor on the day of my burial and on the seventh day next 
following xx^. Item, I appoint to Margaret my daughter, a nun, vjs. viijd., and to 
the monks of Thetford vjs. viijd., to brother Richard Dunham, iijs. iiijd., and to the 
Friars of Babwell iijs. iiijd. To Robert Frere, chaplain, 6s. 8d., and to Alice Rysby, 
my servant, 3s. 4d., and whatever residue there shall be of all my goods not 
bequeathed, and subject to the payment of my debts, I bequeath to Walter, my 
son, in order that my debts may be honestly discharged, and that this my 
testament and last will in every particular may be fulfilled in due manner, and for 
the procuring the execution of this my testament and performing my last will, I 
ordain, make and constitute those dearly beloved to me in Christ, William Copenger 
and Walter Copenger, my sons, and Master Thomas Hyll, clerk, my faithful 
executors, that they may be active and assiduous for my soul as may seem most 
expedient to them and pleasing to God. In Witness whereof I have affixed my 
hand and seal the day and year above named. 

This is the last Will of me, John Copenger of Buxhale aforesaid, the 19th 
July, 1441. In the first place I, the said John Copenger, will that my testament 
and the last will of Master William Copenger my brother be in all things performed. 



236 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Item, I will and appoint to Walter my son, all my lands and tenements, rents and 
services, with all their appurtenances in the Village of Buxhale, together with a 
certain rent which is called Welyrhinrente when it falls into possession, viz., after 
death of Katerine Samson and with a croft which is called Wodecrofte, lying in 
Rattlesden, when it falls in, viz., upon the death of Margaret Copenger, nun, to 
have and to hold the same to Walter, his heirs and assigns, for ever, provided the 
said Walter pay or cause to be paid to his brothers who live near London certain 
moneys as it appears more plainly in the last Will of the said William Copenger, 
and that the said Walter pay or cause to be paid in addition to Alicia Copenger 
my wife an annuity during the life of the said Alicia of 8 marks, usual money of 
England, at the Feasts of the Nativity of our Lord, at Easter, the nativity of St. 
John the Baptist and St. Michael's equally, and that the said Alicia have the chamber 
called the Chapel chamber, situate in the tenement called Fausebrounys with a 
certain chamber thereunto annexed for her proper use with free egress and regress 
to the same as often as she pleases for the whole life of the said Alicia, together 
with the utensils in the kitchen of the said tenement and likewise egress and regress 
to the hearth and to the pool there for drawing and having water with power to 
use the same and fish therein, and with liberty of going into the garden for taking 
fruit and herbs according as she pleases, and she shall also have an annuity during 
life issuing out of the said tenements so bequeathed to the said Walter during the 
aforesaid term, And I appoint to the said Alicia iiij beds which she shall choose, 
and the silver cup with one half of the 12 pewter vessels, together with all the 
vessels. . . . [And after giving to the said Alicia a power of distress in respect of her 
annuity testator continues .•] Item, I will that the said Walter have a certain tenement 
called Smythes in Buxhall with the appurtenances. S^Festator then gives the residue of 
his goods to his son William and continues ;] I appoint to the said Thomas Hyll, 
clerk, 13s. 4d., in order that he may pray for my soul, and to Thomas Drury, 
Esq., 13s. 4d., and to Master John Howard, clerk, 13s. 4d., and they shall have 
what may be necessary in order that they may carry out my testament and my will 
faithfully. Item, I appoint to Master John Cauts'b chaplin, 2od., and to Master 
Roger Pryk, chaplin, xxd., and to Richard Scheltun lod. Item, I bequeath to the 
Guild of the Holy Trinity and to the Guild of Corpus Christi and to the Guild 
of St. John the Baptist, to each of them i bz. of corn and i bz. of malt and oats. 
I appoint to John Teryng out of the debts which are owing to me 20s., and I 
appoint to John, my servant, a cloak of the best, to Nicholas Barbar a cloak double, 
to John Oseberde, jun., one cloak fine, and one mourning, to John Creketot a tunic 



Early Wills with Extracts 237 



with short sleeves, and John Oseberde senior a , to Thomas Gold a tunic with 

fur, I to William Orybelle a hood, i bz. of corn and one bz. of malt, to Richard 
Jarge (?) a tunic with hood, and to Agnes Joyce linen which she owes to Alicia 
my wife. Item, I appoint to Simon (Rolande ?), to John Baron, to Agnes Canon, 
to Alice Foot, Alice Baron, Margaret Gold, Agnes Beneyt and to Alice Osebode, to 
each of them i bz. of corn. In Witness whereof I have to this my last will set my 
seal. Given on the day and at the place and in the year of our Lord above 
written. 

William Belts, of Boxwell {sic) (1551): — 

" My soul to God my father, trusting only to be saved by his mercy in the 
death of Jesus Christ in his sacrifice only." 

To Anne, my wife ^^6 13s. 4d. and her apparel and half my household goods, 
the other half to be divided between my son John and my dau'' Agnes. 

My manor in Boxall called Cokerellis to be let for three years to pay debts. 
I will that John my son shall have it at the same price George Saulter hiered it 
of Master Symonde and all my corn and cattell to my son John, to pay my debts 
with the ferm of the manor, and my wife's dowry. If son John die and no will 
made, then my dau' Agnes to enjoy the same and if she die then William Betts of 
Hadnam to have the lease of the manor and corn and cattell. 

To my dau*^ Agnes £100 {£^ a year until the ;/^ioo is paid). 

To my son John and his heirs my manor of Cokeralls in Buxsall and in default 
of heirs to my dau' Agnes. 

Residue to my executors who are my son John and dau' Agnes and William 
Betts of Hadnam " myne good cosigne " and my brother Lowdall of Dysse to be 
supervisor. 

" Witness that this is my last will I Willm. Betts of Boxsall have wreten this 
w' myne owne hande the daye and yeare abovesaid." 

Dated August 6 in 5'" Edw. VI. 

Proved last April 1552 at Norwich by John Betts, power reserved to the other 

executors. 

(Epis' Cons" Court of Norwich. Register " Lyncolne," fo. 25.) 

Roger Salter of Buxall, co. Suf" Shorn aker : — 
My soul to God and my body to be buried in the Churchyard. 
To the poor men's box 12'*. 

To Margaret my wife, house and land in Buxall and Fymbarowe for life, to 
bring up my children. 



238 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

My house in Great Fynbarrowe called Engors and lands thereto belonging to 
wife for life and then among my children. 

To my son George, my house in G' Finbarowe called Engors, he paying his 
sisters Martha Salter and Rose Salter ^9 each. 

To my son Thomas, my house in Buxall he paying his 2 sisters _^io each. 

Residue to wife Margaret, and W'" Syer and Robert Selowes alias Smythe 
executors. 

Dated xxxix. (sic) August 1566. 

Proved July 4, 1567. (Cons. Court, Norwich, Register Bunne, fo. 12.) 

IVill of John Crosse, Oct. 16, 14 EHz. : — 
Devise to Anne Doggett and Katherin Crosse of two tenements in Buxhall 
called the Marshe and ffrotes (then in occupation of John Able) for their lives 
and after decease of Anne her part to go to John Doggett her eldest son in fee. 

IViil of Edward Bradstreet, Sept. 3, 15 Eliz. : — 
Gift of tenement in Buxhall to Margery Bradstreet until Thomasyn his daughter 
should attain 21, and if Margery his mother died before daughter attained 21, to 
his brother John Bradstreet until she did attain that age. 

JVill of Henry Crampton, April i, 1574 : — 
Reciting his wife with child — if man-child gift to him of all freeholds and 
copyholds in fee, but until 21 executors to take rents. If wife not delivered of a 
man-child executors to sell and proceeds to be divided between children on 
attaining 21. And reciting that John Asshold had sold to him certain copyholds 
in Buxhall " held of Mrs. Coppynger wydowe " as of Manor of Buxhall, he directs 
that if John pays a certain sum he may repurchase, but if not then to go with rest 
of his estate. 

IVill of John Pylboroive, Nov. 12, 22 Eliz.: — 

Gift to his mother Alyce Grymsey of copyholds in Buxhall and fFynborough • 
for life, she paying to his brother William Pylborowe 20J. and after her death to 
said William Pylborowe, he paying to Alice his sister all gifts made to her by 
will of William Pylborowe testator's father. Gift to Alice of T^y. 4^. to be paid 
by William within 3 years after his mother's death. Gift of 33^. 4^. to such of 
" my Brothers and sisters ye children of Robert Grymse my father in law," to be 
paid to them by his brother William Pylborowe after his mother's death. 

' He owned Payne's Croft and Benet's Meadow, having been admitted April 13, 22 Eliz. 



Early Wills and Extracts 239 

IVill of Gefferye Creeme, of Buxhall, co. Suff', yeoman (1595): — 

To be buried at Buxhall or elsewhere. 

To poor of Buxhall 50s. and Hytcham 50s. 

To John Bun, of Layham, 20s. which he oweth me. 

To Drinkeston poor 30s. 

To Dorothy Creeme, dau' ot my son Roger, a newly built tenement in 
Hytcham. 

To Roger, my son, copvholds in Hytcham. 

To Edmund Creeme, a tenement in Polstede when 24 — (a son of Roger). 

To JefFraye Creeme, son of s'' Roger, land in Brettenham (bought of Mr. 
Nunc, of Pyckenham, Norf''), when 24. 

To Henry, Roger, and William Creeme, sons of my son Roger, _^20 each 
when 22. 

To Joan Creeme, dau'- of my son Roger, ;^io. 

My son Roger Creeme to be my sole executor. 

Geo. Dickinson, parson of Buxhall \ 

Will. Grynwode, of Hycham [ Witnesses. 

Willm. Jowre and John Sellowes the younger of FynbarroweJ 

Dated Feb. 8, i595-(6). 

Proved March 17, i566(-7), at Norwich. 

(Episcopal Consistorial Court of Norwich : register " Skyppon," fo. 312.) 

JVill of Thomas Laman, Feb. 16, 1589 : — 
Gift to Bytteresse Laman, his wife, of copyholds for life, and then to Henry 
" Lawman " his son in fee, she the said Bytteresse keeping houses in repair, and 
when Henry comes into possession he paying unto testator's other seven children 
20s. and to testator's grandchild 2s.' 

Will of Robert Rydnall, March 16, 40 Eliz. : — 

Body to be buried in churchyard of Buxall. Gift to poor people of Buxall of 

20s. at his funeral. Gift of a "Redd Cowe wch is kepte with my sonne Richarde 

at Mendlesham to my dawghter Christyan Rydnall." Gift to each of children of 

sons Richard and Edward of 6s. 8d. and for payment to children of Richard tes- 

' The copyholds were 8 acres anciently called Small Hobbyes in Finborough Magna in a 
certain field called Copinger field, to which Thomas Laman was admitted May 30, 35 Hen. VIII. 



240 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

tator pardons him 40s. he owed. The rest (except one posted bed which he gave 
to son Robert after the decease of his mother) to Christyan his wife whom he 
appointed executrix. Signed in presence of George Dyckenson, clerk, and parson of 
Buxall, Roger Greame and IMargery Drake and others. " Memorand' : That the 
goodman Roberte Rydnall sen. acknowledged before vs the said wytnesses that the 
table in the hall with one cubborde in the chaumber are the goodes of his dowghter 
Xpi'an geiuen her by her grandmother and godfather Roberte Ynnes of Woollpytt. 
Item : I wyll that my dawghter Christian shall haue all such gooddes as weare myne 
at the tyme of her moother's death and after her mother's decease the property 
wherof is not altered or chaunged and not beinge spente by her said mother." 

Agnes Copinger, 1599 : — 
Extract: "My mynde and will is that my nephew fFrancis Copinger sonne of 
my Sonne Thomas Copinger shall haue two of my best beds whiche be in my house 
at Buxhall as they nowe be there, the other beds houshould stufs and other furni- 
ture whatsoeuer is remayninge at this tyme of myne in that my house at Buxhall 
I giue and bequeathe vnto Roberte Copinger my sonne. My best yellow cloake I 
give vnto my daughter Susan, the Ladie Clive my tuffed Tuffitie goune, my veluet 
kirtle and ouerbodie belonginge therevnto or which I vse commonlie with it. I giue 
vnto my daughter Elizabeth the wife of Richarde Lee esquire my lytle sylver boule 
or cup whiche Mistress Judithe Clive did giue me." 

JVill of William Jower, Jac. I. : — 
Gift to Robert Sowthgate the younger of one half of the Marshe in Buxhall in 
fee upon condition that he pay to William Sowthgate his brother ^5 within one 
year after decease of Robert Sowthgate the elder, father of the said Robert Sowth- 
gate the younger. But if not paid or Robert the younger die without issue of his 
body then that George Sowthgate son of William Sowthgate of Buxhall have in fee 
the said part of the Marshe ground for ever. 

IVill of Simon Maye, May 12, 19 Jac. 1.: — 
Devise to John Maye his kinsman the sone of John May his brother dec. of 
his tenement called Barons wherein he then dwelt in Buxhall and all copyholds of 
Manor of Buxhall in fee after decease of Johan testator's wife. 

Will of Daniel Child, Nov. 23, 21 Jac.:— 
Body to be buried in church or churchyard of Buxhall. Gift to Jane Rushe 



Early Wills and Extracts 241 

his kinswoman wife of Edmund (sic) Rushe of Buxhall of Tenement called Brownes 
and four acres in Buxhall for life and after decease to Edward Rushe son of said 
Edward Rushe and Mary Rushe daughter of the said Edward in fee. To Thomas 
Murton his kinsman 20s. and 20s. more in six years. To Edmond and Robert 
Murton his kinsmen 20^. each. To Samuel, Daniel, Jane and Frances Rushe, sons 
and daughters of Edward Rushe, 40J. each. Residue to said Edward Rushe who is 
to be executor. Proved 29 [blank] at Finborow. 

(Epis. Consis. Court of Norwich. Reg. 1623, p. 169.) 

fVill of Richard Martin^ May 9, 1631 : — 

Richard Martin the Elder of Buxhall, co. Suff'', yeoman, the unprofitable 
servant of God, weake in Body but of good and sound memorye. 

My body to be buried in Christian burial, when it shall please God to call me 
out of this transitory world nothing doubting but for his dere sonnes sake and 
infinite mercies and through faith in his sonne Christ Jesus my only saviour 
mediator Lord and Redemer his meritts death passion and assention hee will 
receyve my Soule into his Glory and blessed Saints And as concerning my Body I 
doubt not but according to the Article of my faith at the greate day of the Lord 
and generall resarrection when all flesh shall appeare before the Judgment seate of 
Christ I shall receyve the same againe by the Almighty power of God wherewith 
hee is able to subdue all things to himselfe not a corruptable mortall weake and vile 
boddy as it is nowe But an Licorruptable Imortall strong and perfect Boddy in all 
things like unto the Glorious body of my Lord and Saviour Christ Jesus : — 

To Buxhall poor 13s. 4d. 

To my son Peter Martin, tenement, barns and yard &c., and my son Rich''- 
Martin is to pay my son Peter £2, in default my son Richard to have the tene- 
ment, barns, &c. 

To my son Peter all bonds and bills and one greate hutche being in the Parlor 
chamber and all goods in it. 

All moveable goods in house and elsewhere to my sons Peter and Richard 
equally. 

My son Peter to be sole executor and John Towler of Pakenham, supervisor. 

Bryant Parker, clerke 1 ^^,. 
-,,.,,. „ , [Witnesses. 

William banaer > 

Proved Oct. 7, 1631, at Norwich. 

(Episcopal Consistorial Court of Norwich. Register " Purgall," fo. 122.) 

32 



242 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Will of Robert Rydnall, Nov. 7, 1631. 
" Item. : I glue and bequeath all my copplehold land lyeing in three pieces wherof 
two peeces are holden of the Mannor of Buxhall and thother peece is holden of the 
Mannor of Cockerells. All wch land lye in Buxhall wch I giue unto John Rydnall 
(sonne of Robert Rydnall of Mendlesham in the Countie of Suffolk yeoman) and 
to his heirs for euer." 

Will of Edward Crosse, Feb. 22, 11 Car. I.: — 
Direct that executor within one year after his decease sell all his copyhold 
land and tenements in Buxhall and that the proceeds be paid to " Three of my 
heirs and children." Appointment of William Greene as executor. 

Will of Robert Garner, Aug. 15, 1637 : — 
Gift to Jeremye Garner, his second son, in fee of tenement and lands in Buxhall 
as well freehold as copyhold, and then in occupation of William Sweyne and William 
Fowler. 

Will of John Pilbarowe, Sept. 10, 13 Car. I.: — 
Gift to Anne his wife of tenement called Sraythes holden of Manor of Bux- 
hall for life, and then to Richard Pilbarowe his son in fee. If Anne remarry gift 
to Richard to take immediate effect. 

Will of Thomas Lockwood, Jan. 4, 1646 : — 
Gift to his wife Anne of all copyholds in Buxhall for life, and after to be 
disposed of by executors amongst children equally. Gift of all lands and tenements 
to son Bernard, and appointment of said Bernard and wife Anne as executors. 

Will of William Carpenter, Oct. 2^, 1652 : — 
Devise of copyhold tenement held of Manor of Buxhall to son William on 
condition of payment to Elizabeth, testator's wife, ^^14 yearly. 

Will of Nathaniel Maiden, Jug. 13, 1664 : — 
Gift to Abigayl Hassord, whom he intended to marry, of tenement in Buxhall 
for life, she lodging any children out of service, and then to John Maiden his eldest 
son in fee provided he pay testator's son Stephen and daughter Alice £s 3. year. 



Early Wills and Extracts 243 

l-Fill of Francis Brown, March 10, 1684 : — 
Devise to son William Brown of all freehold and copyhold in Buxhall in 
occupation of John Griggs after decease of Mary, testator's wife. 

Margaret Copinger, Aug. 2, 17 10: — 
Recites will of late husband William Copinger, Feb. 18, 1707, directing all his 
property to be sold in two years by Gregory Copinger his brother and testatrix in 
order to pay debts, and the residue to be for his wife for bringing up children, and 
death of William, August 3, 1707, being seised in fee of (amongst other lands) a 
Toft and Croft of land called Jarrolds Wood 7 acres lying between lands of William 
Copinger on the south and lands of diverse men on the north and upon lands there- 
tofore of Sir Roger North towards the east and upon the Queen's highway towards 
the west, and also seised according to the custom of the Manor of Rattlesden 
in reversion after the death of Mary Copinger his mother, and the testatrix of a 
messuage and 6 acres of wood and of a tenement called Parminsters 16 acres late 
of John Narsing and a pightle of land of 2 acres lying under the wood called 
Rattlesden Wood to which William Copinger was admitted Oct. 19, 1696, after 
the death of Thomas Copinger his brother; and Reciting payment of debts and con- 
veyance of freeholds and reversion to Ezekiel Sparke of Risby upon trust after death 
of Margaret and Mary his mother-in-law to sell again. And Reciting that Gregory 
Copinger May 23, 1709, surrendered two copyholds of Buxhall Manor, and a copyhold 
tenement called Brownes and 4 acres to the uses of her Will, Testatrix directed 
such copyholds to be sold by her Executors and the moneys received together with 
those received from the sale of freeholds and reversions above to be divided amongst 
her children equally. Gift to daughter Sarah of " downe ffeather bedd " now being 
in the Parlour chamber in her own dwellinghouse. Like gift to daughter Thomasine 
and another "ffeather bed," and to daughters Margaret, Elizabeth, and Anne of one 
feather bed each. Residue to be divided amongst the five daughters equally. 
Appointment of her brothers Samuel Cracherode, Charles Cracherode, and Gregory 
Copinger executors. 



CHAPTER IX 
The Parish Registers 

THE Parish Registers of Buxhall to the year 1699 are kept in three books. 
The earliest is a parchment book measuring 10^ inches by 5 J inches, and 
consists of 26 leaves or 52 pages, beginning January 6, 1558, and ending 
May 16, 1653. 1 It is well preserved and in a tolerably clear hand, evidently the 
entries previous to about 1600 have been transcribed from some earlier Register. 
The second Register commences November, 1653, when William Salter was appointed 
Registrar. This volume is a quarto parchment of fifteen skins of thirty pages of 
entries, mostly in double columns. One corner has been eaten away by some 
destructive insect or by mice, and the parts gone will in the following copy be 
indicated by dotted lines. The first page contains some names of the inhabitants of 
Buxhall by whom the Registrar was chosen, but many of these names are now illegible. 
The Register was correctly kept till the death of William Copinger, Rector in 1684, 
but from that date to 1695 the entries are but occasional, and many of them 
evidently entries made some time subsequent to the events recorded. The third 
Register (which is numbered i on the outside cover) is a smaller quarto of parch- 
ment consisting of nine skins or eighteen pages of entries, being from the beginning 
of the year 1695 to the month of July, 171 1. These also are made in double 
columns. There is a fourth Register from which but a few names have been taken. 
It is a paper small folio, being a Register " of the Names and qualities of the 
Persons who have been buried in Woollen in the Parish of Buxhall." This begins 
in 1694 and ends in 1731, and is endorsed on the cover, "Buxhall SufF. 1694. The 
Buriall Book." 

' The Registers of some churches begin much earlier. By the Parish Register Abstract as given 
by Mr. Burn in his "Registrum Ecclesias Parochialis " it appears that there were Registers beginning 
in 1538, 812 (40 of these contain entries prior to that date); those beginning between 1538 and 1558 
number 1822; those between 1550 and 1603, 24.4.8; those between 1603 and i6;o, 969; those 
between 1650 and 1700, 2,757; those between 1700 and 1750, 1,476; and since then between 600 
and 700. 



The Parish Registers 



245 



A Register of all the Cristeninge Mariages and Buriales in the Parish of Buxhall from the 

FIFTH YEARE of THE RaIGNE OF OUR MOST GRAYOUS SoVAIGNE LaDY OuENE ElIZABETH. 



Januanc vi '. 

fFebruarie iiij"'. 

iiij. 

viij. 

xiiij. 

xxviij. 

April vii. 

xvj. 

Maye xix. 

June XXV. 

Julye xvij. 

August xvij. 

xvij. 

XX. 
XXV. 

xxviij. 
xxxi. 

September vj. 



October iiij. 
Nouember xxx. 



ffcbruarie v. 

xij. 

xiiij. 

xvi. 



XVllJ. 

xxiiij. 
March XV. 



xxvij. 

xxvij. 

April ix. 

xi. 

xvj. 

xxiiij. 

IVIayc V. 



Buried. 



^inno Domini 1558. 
Robt. Deuerus, Buried. 

Robt. Baker sone vnto Edmund B. Babtised. 
William Bradstret Buried. 

Anne Leach daugtte of Rich. Leach Babtised. 
Alys Deuerous wyfe of Robt. Buried. 
John Copinger sone of Henry, Babtised. 
Margerye Morton wyfe vnto Robt. 
John More 

Robt. Jacob sone vnto John Jacob 
Agnes Maye wyfe of William Maye 
Thomas Stone 
Margery ffrancis 
Robt. Smith 
Agnes Passevant 
Thomas Kendall 

Anne Kysse wyfe of William Kyssc 
Jone Joye 
Robt. Crosse 
John 

William Pylbarrow 
Margaret Bret daughte of William Babtised. 
Margaret Knocke 1 r • j 
Rose Gage Wedovve / 

Henry Marten sone of Robt. Marten Baptised. 
Edmond Marten sone of Robt. Marten '\ 
Henry Marten sone of Robt. Marten 
Thomas Crosse | „ 

Alys Leach daughter of Rich. ( 

Jone Baker wyfe of George Baker 
Jone Spynke wyfe of Rich. Spynke / 

Tobye Cage sone of William Cage baptised. 
Tobye Cage sone of William Buried. 
Jone Salter daughter of Gregory Babtised. 
Elizabeth Smyth wyfe of Robt. Buried. 

^nno Domini 1559' 
Anne the wyfe of John a Wod "1 
Gcffery Stebbinge J 

Anne Salter daught' of John Salter "j 
Rose Maior daught' of ffremey Maior r 
Thomas Salter son of Rog' Salter J 

Edmond Spink buried. 
Edmond Coppinger sone of Henry Babt 



uried. 



246 



History of the Parish of Buxhal 



Mayc vij. 

ix. 

xvij. 

xxj. 

August xxi. 

XX vij. 

September xxiij. 

XXV. 

XXX. 

October xi. 
Nouembcr xxv. 

XXX. 

December iij. 

\1 

Januaric x. 

xix. 

xxv. 

ffebruarie xxv. 

March xvi. 



Buried. 



John Sire and Katheren Salter married. 

Theomas Lettice Buried. 

Margere Jacob daugh' of John Babtised. 

Rich. Bond and Katheren lambe Married. 

Katheren Cristifer 

John Salter 

Margaret Bonde Babtised. 

Katheren More "j 

Thomas ftVancis - Buried. 

Jone More \vjCe of Rich. More J 

John Wysse and Agnes Hagon married. 

John Marchall and Eliz. Jo' married. 

Clement Baker , 

John Wode 

Agnes Brester y Buried. 

Rich. Bonde 

John Sharppe 

Cristian Goddart Babt 

Robt. Bret. "j 

Margere More I „ 

Teria Smyth 

John Deuerous J 



xxv. 

April vij. 

xiij. 

XX. 

xxiiij. 

Maye xij. 

xxvj. 

Julye ij. 

August ix. 

September ij. 



October xiij. 

xiij. 

xviij. 

November iij. 



December xx 
ffebruarie xv 



led. 



Jnno Domini 1560, 

Dorothc Bret Babtised. 

Edmond Skepper Babtised. 

Agnes Smyth "> 

Roger Bradstret - Buried. 

Elizabeth Watson J 

Charitye Bond Babtised. 

Rich. More and Alys Morton Married 

Ceryle Morton ] 

Andrew Salter J 

Robt. More and Margaret Crowne \ 

John Myxforth and Agnes Elys ; Marrie( 

Thomas Smith and Margaret Cage j 

Andrew Knock and Agnes Grene. ' 

William Deuerous sonc of Robt. \ r 1 ■ 

Margaret Smyth daught' of Thomas j 

John Losse and Marie Tayler "1 

William Burges and Alys Emmes '- married. 

Henry Rycher and Dorothy Parke j 

Thomas Tyre son of William Tyre Babtised. 

Roger Grene and Helena Deuerous married. 



ef«»o Domini 1561. 
April xxj. Rose Salter daught' of George Buried. 



The Parish Registers 



247 



April xxvij. 

Maye iiij. 

June j. 

J- 

xij. 

August xviij. 

xxxj. 

xxxj. 

September j. 

vij. 

xiiij. 

xvj. 

October xii. 

November ix. 



Maye ix. 

x-xxj. 

September xx. 

April ix. 

ix. 

October xij. 

XXV. 
XXV. 

xxvj. 

November viij. 

xiij. 

xxix. 

December xiij. 

xxvij. 

Januaric iij. 



XXUIJ. 

March xiiij. 



Babtised. 



Elizabeth Spynke 

John Marten 

Susan Jacob daught' of John Jacob ]■ Babtised. 

Thomasyng Baker daugh' of Edmond 

Thomas Richer sone of Henry 

William Pylbarrow Buried. 

John Burget sone of William ^ 

William Pylbarrow sone of William ) 

Agnes Burgett wyfe of William Buried. 

Robt. Knock sone of Andrew Knock "| 

Elizabeth Murton daught' of Wat' - Babtised. 

William More sone of Rich. More J 

Elizabeth Murton Buried. 

Agnes Tayler daught' of Thomas Babtised. 

Thomas Branstone and Katheren Bond ^ 

,Jn>io Domini 1562. j Married. 

Robt. Murton and Dorothy Childe ) 

Ursula Bert daught' of William "i 

William Leach sone of Rich. Leach '- Babtised. 

John Bret sone of Leanard Bret J 
Robt. More and Agnes Kenakers married. 
Jone Bert Buried. 

John Knock 1 „ 1 • 1 

i, . ^, 1 Babtised. 

Martha Skepper J 

William Leach Buried. 

Elizabeth Coppinger Babtised. 

Henry Makyne and Agnes Baker married. 

Rachaell Maior ^ 

William Smyth 

Susan Murton 

Anne Branstone 

Susan Murton "I 

John Dave J 

John Sellowes and Helena Makyn married. 

Rich. Marten sone of Robt. Marten Babtised. 



Babtised. 



iried. 



•Anno Do 



1563. 



April iij. Henry Richer Buried. 

Maye i. Phylypp Jacob sone of John Jacob 

XXX. Elizabeth Murton daught' of Water 

June vj. Agnes Deuerous daught' of Robt. 

Julye XXV. fFrancis Sowgate daught' of Henry 

September xxix. Anne Baker daugh' of Edmond 

October xvij. John Murton son of Robt. 

xxij. Robt. Grymsey and Maryc Pylbarrow Married. 



Babtised. 



248 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



November vlj. 

xxj. 

December v. 

xvij. 

Januarie viij. 

ffebruarie xxvij. 

Marche xxiiij. 



April xix. 
Maye x. 

XXV. 

October xv. 

i. 

Januarie vi. 

vi. 

ffebruarie ij. 

xviij. 

XXV. 



Robt. Rycher sone of Henry Rycher ^ 

William Tayler sone of Thomas - Babtised. 

Helena Syre daught' of William J 

Edward Bret sone of Leanard Bret \ g^btised. 

Katheren Burget J 

Edward Bret Buried. 

Susan Richer daughter of John Babtised. 

Cristifer Arnold Buried. 



Jnno Do 



1564. 



Maye i. 

XX. 

June xij. 

xxiij. 

Julye i. 

August V. 

September xxiij. 

November i. 

XXV. 

December xvj. 
Januarie vij. 

XX. 
XX. 

ffebruarie x. 

Marche xiij. 

xviij. 



Mave 



]une XV. 

August xi. 

xviij. 



Bratrix Osbowne Buried. 

Thomasynge Bert Babtised. 

Elizabeth Syre Wedow, Buried. 

Agnes Makyn "j 

Rich. Leach V Babtised. 

Agnes Lcsse J 

Agnes Knock wyfe of Andrew Knock -1 
Susan Skepper daught' of William - Bur 

Rych Richer. J 

John Rushe sone of William Babtised. 

Jnno Domini 1565. 
Dyna Smyth daught' of John \ 
Agnes Bret daughter of Leanard | gg^tised. 
Paul Skepper j 

John Jacob sone of John J 

Henry Syre and Alys Jowre | U3.xn^d. 
Edmond Studd and Anne Elys J 
Water Deuerous sone of Robt. Buried. 
Robt. Studd ~j 

Walter Copinger sone of Henry - Babtised. 
Marie Richer daught'^ of Henry J 



vyfe of Robt. 
Babtised. 



ried. 



Bratrix Leach 

Jane Tayler 

ffrancis Grymsey 

Andrew Branston Babtised. 

Agnes Salter Wedow Buried. 

Robt. Murton sone of Walt' Babtised. 

Jyino Domini 1566. 
Edmond Makyn sone of Henry. 
Susan Sowgate daugh' of Henry. 
Walter Skarpe and Jane Spynkc married. 
Dorothy Bert Buried. 

John Brydgges and Margaret Hunt married. 
Jone Bond ") 



Dyna Syre J 



Babtised. 



The Parish Registers 



249 



September xv. John Waller and Anne Reve marr 

xxij. Julyan Bert Babtised. 

October xij. Andrew Crowne Buried. 

xiij. Thomas Grene and Alys Ward 

xvij. Andrew Knock and Helena Trypc 

November xiiij. Margaret Walker 

XXX. John Tayler sone of Edmond 

December xxij. Jane Brydgges daught' of" John 

iFebruarie ix. Jane Burget daught' of William 

xxvj. Helena Baker daughf of Edmond 



^nno Do 



1567. 



March XXV. Alys Leach daught' of Rich. Babtised. 
Maye xiiij. Thomas Passevant p'son Buried, 
xxviij. Roger Salter Burred. 

Thomas Salter and Anne Salter married. 
Rosse Shrife daught' of Thomas Babtised. 
John Salter and Alys Gysborough married. 
Anne Grymsey daught' of Robt. 'j 
Edmund Murton sone of Robt. | pi-, 
December xxviij. Thomas Makyn sone of Henry I 
Januarie xx. Henry Richer sone of Henry J 



Julye vi. 

August xvij. 

September xxi. 

October xij. 

xij. 



Apryl iiij. 





XIX. 


Maye 


xiij. 




xvij. 




XXX. 


Jun 


e vi. 


xxvij. 




xvij. 


August i. 


August XV. 


October v. 


•November 


xiiij. 




XX. 


Decembei 


• iiij. 




XXX. 


Januarie 


xvj. 




xvj. 


fFebruarie 


xiij. 



^4nt!o Domini 1568. 

Edmond Jacob sone of John Jacob 1 R K ' H 

Thomas Tayler sone of Thomas Tayler J 

William Skepper ■\ 

Thomas Brydges - Buried. 

Jane Brydges j 

Susan Syre daughter of William 1 „ , . , 
„,•,,• \, . „, , Babtised. 

William Murton sone of Walter J 

Robert Leach and Jone Pearson married. 

George Spynke Buried. 

Martha Salter daught' of Thomas Babtised. 

Thomas Baker and Jane Salter 

Robt. Wode and Jone Skepper 

Anne Brydges daughter of John Babtised. 

John Able and Margaret Coocke married. 

William Skarpe sone of Beatrice Babtised. 

fFrancis Maldine Buried. 

Agnes Baker daughter of Thomas \ 

ftrancis Studd daughter of Edmond 

Thomasyn Leach daughter of Robt. V Babtised. 

Rosse Grymsey daughter of Robt. 

Anne Beamys daughter of John j 

Z2, 



Married. 



250 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



April xxiij. 

XXX. 

June V. 

X. 

Julye xxxi. 
September xxv. 

October xj. 
November xiij. 

xxv. 
xxvij. 

Januarie i. 

vij. 

xxviij. 

xxix. 

fFebruarie xxviij. 

March viij. 

xviij, 



j7ino Domini 1569- 
Ann Rycher daughter of Henry ^ 
Pernell Salter daughter of George ( g^;,^;^^^^ 
Sara Makyn daughter of Henry f 
Robert Sowgate sone of Henry j 
William Osborne and Jone Jones ^ 

Robt. Salter and Jone Colman | Married. 

William Burgys and Margaret Kyssc j 
William ffowler and Jone Spynke j 

Mary Able daughter of John \ g^btised. 

Rebecka Deuerous daughter of Robt. j 
John Rushbrocke Buried. 

Thomas Bull | gabtiscd. ^ 

Margaret Spynk J . 

William Salter Buried. 

John Smyth sone of John Babtised. 

Margret Spynk Buried. 

Robert Murton sone of Robt. | g^^jjiggd, 

Gregory Tayler sone of Thomas J 



Jnno Domini 1570. 
Maye xxiij. Walter Coppinger Buried. 
October xx. Elizabeth Beart Babtised. 
xxvj. Elizabeth Beart Buried. 
November xiiij. George Dickenson and Eliz. Salter 
xix. John Salter and Jane Lever 



XXVJ. 

xxvj. 
December iij. 

X. 

xvij. 

Januarie xiiij. 

xxj. 

Marche xxiiij. 



Edmond ffrancis and Eliz. Smyth 
John Doe sone of John Doe 
Dorothy Syre daughter of William 
Dorothy Brydges daughter of John 
John Studd 

Anne Salter daughter of Thomas 
Susan Beamys daughter of Thomas 
Crystopher Grymsey 

Jnno Domini 157I. 
June xxviij. Margaret Bridges wyfe of John Bu 
September xxiij. Adlard Newman 

vij. Thomas Baker sone of Thomas 
vij. Jane Murton daughter of Walter 
vij. Basteford Dericke 
November xvi. Robt. Branson and Jone Wellam 
John Brydges and Eliz. Smyth 
Januarie i. Susan Abell ) 

fFebruarie xvi. Susan Salter daughter of John j 
xix. Susan Salter buried. 
March vij. Thomas Sovirgate Baptised. 



Married. 



Babtised 



Bapti : 

I maried. 
Baptised. 



The Parish Registers 



25' 



April vj. 

June viiij. 

September xv. 

October xij. 

xviij. 

November xi. 

XV. 

xxiij. 

Januarie xxv. 

xxxi. 

fFebruarie ix. 

xvi. 

March viij. 



Anno Domini 1572- 
Abraham Sergeant sonc of Rich. 
Anne Salter daughter of George 
Susan Brydges 
George Bramys 
Abraham Seargent Buried. 
Martha Smyth Baptised. 
AHce Salter wyfe of Gregory Buri 
Thomasine Salter Baptised. 



Baptised. 



Jeames Passavant 
ffrancis Salter ^ 
Anne Studd [ 
Daniell Richer j 
Susan Makyn j 



ed. 



Baptysed. 



Anno Do 

Marche xxxj. Katherine Doe 1 _ 
Aprill xix. William Syre j 
Maye xiiij. Jone Leach Buried. 



1573. 



June xxvij. 
Julye iij. 



September xxij. 

xxvij. 

December xxvij. 

fFebruarie vj. 

vj- 



Margret Mason | ^^ 

Thomas Seargent J 

Eden Mason Buried. 

Thomas Murton Baptysed. 

Eliz. Brydges 

Robt. Spinke 

George Murton 

Jane Salter daughter of George 

Thomas Salter sone of Thomas at y" 

John Grymsey 



Buried. 



Bapt: 



April xvij. 

xviij. 

xxvj. 

August j. 

October iij. 

iij. 

X. 

xxiij. 

November ij. 

December xij. 

xxvj. 

fFebruarie xj. 

xxj. 

xxviij. 

Marche xxiiij. 



Anno Domini 1574' 
Agnes Brydges daughter of John "j 
Edward Wode 

Henry Sowgate J 

Edward Salter sone of John ^ 

Martha Salter daughter of John ( 
fFrancys Branson 

Elizabeth Newman J 

Robt. Myles and Pewnell Dove 
Henry Marsh and Katherin Salter 

r""'^Mr I Baptised. 
George Makyn J 

Edmond Baker Buried. 

Barbarie Edwards Baptysed. 

Robt. Deuerous 1 _ . , 
[ Buried. 
Walter Murton I 



Baptysed. 



3aptysed 



252 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Marche xxxj. 

XXX. 

Maye iiij. 



Julye iij. 
vij. 

XXX. 

September xxix. 

xxviij. 

Januarie v. 

xij. 

fFebruarie xxj. 

xxiij. 

xxiij. 

March V. 



Jnno Domini 1575- 
Margrett Cuttyngc "j 
Anne Bradstret \ Buried. 

George Salter sen' j 
Martha Mann Baptysed. 
Margrett Bennet Buried. 
John Shipp and Susan Salter married. 
John Salter sone of John at Church post- 
Alice Crowe Buried. 
George Sargeant 
William Rycher 
Martha Studd 

Edward Salter sone of George \ Baptised. 
Nathaniell Bramys 
Rich. Grymsey 
Zacheos Smyth 
Rich. Crowe Buried. 
John Salter and Aldry Bette Maried. 



Jnno Do 



1576. 



Maye j. 

xiij. 

June V. 

xi. 

August ij. 

September iiij. 

viij. 

xviij. 

xxiij. 

November viij. 

October xxvij. 

Januarie xv. 

fFebruarie xiiij. 

xxj. 

March iiij. 

xiiij. 

xiiij. 



Baptised. 



Alice Salter 

George Bett 

George Clive and Susan Coppinger maried. 

Edward fFrancys 



Baptysed. 



Ma 



Sebastian Mann 

Lewes Wode 

Thomas Kempe 

John Derbye and Martha Murton 

Thomas Downinge and Eliz. Bennet J 

Margerye Bradstret Buried. 

John Salter sone of John of Langham Bap. 

Richard Syre Baptysed. 

Mathew Dedham 1 „ . , 

r i_ c 1 r r Buried. 

John baiter sen' j 

Susan Salter daughter ot Thomas ■) 

Robt. Smyth / ^"'P"' 

Agnes Baker Buried. 



Jnno Do 



Aprill vij. 

XXV. 

Maye x. 

xij. 

xij. 

xxxi. 



1577. 



Robt. Derbye 1 
Robt. Makyn j 
Judithe Arminger 
John Baker 
Anne Martyne 
John Branson 



Baptised. 



Baptysed. 



July xxviij. John Salter and Agnes Partridge maried. 



The Parish Registers 



253 



August xxij. 

Septem: xxij. 

October xxvj. 

XX vj. 

November iij, 

xvij. 

xxix. 

December j. 



fFebruarie ix. 
xiiij. 
xxij. 



March 



Baptysed. 



XllJ. 



John Doggett, Jun' 

William Kysse 

Jane Murton 

John Smythe 

Alyce Smyth Buried. 

Eliz. Brydges daughter of John Baptised. 

Avice Salter of y' age of Ixxxxv Buried. 

Amye Seargent Baptysed. 

Thomas Salter Buried. 

Josua Clyve sone of George Clive Esqre Baptysed. 

Eliz. Studd Baptysed. 

Jacob Buried. 

Robt. Murton sen' Buried. 

Rich. Bell Baptysed. 

Eliz. Salter daughter of John E. Tayler Bap: 



Anno Domini I578. 



Januarie xviij. 


Elizabeth Bradstret 




fFebruarie xv. 


Anne ffrancis 


' Baptysed. 


xxiiij. 


Raulf Salter sone of John Jun' 


March ij. 


Robt. Losse 


) 



1579. 



April! V. 


Mathew Ellys Buried. 


July xix. 


Rosse Brydges "j 

Dorothy Derick \ Baptysed. 

Edmond Gobbett j 


xxvj. 


August ij. 


xix. 


Henry Coppinger and Anne fFysshser marr. 


xxiij. 


Elizabeth Syre Baptysed. 


September xv. 


Robert Brownrygge and Anne Salter maried. 


October xxv. 


Thomas Salter sone of John sen' Baptised. 


xxviij. 


Richard Ward Buried. 


fFebruarie viij. 


George Kysse Baptysed. 



Jnno Do 



1580. 



Maye i. Brydgett Baker 

i. Philipp Osborne 

viij. Thomas Martine r Baptysed. 

June vij. Margret Keble 

August — . Eliz. Doggett 

September xxij. John Levitt and Alyce Grymsey maried. 

xxv. Anne Bradstret | _ 

December xviij. John Salter sone of John Junr ) 

Januarie ix. George Randall and Km. Raynold maried, 



254 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Anno Domini 158I. 

Maye vij. Agnes Randall 

vj. Henry Beamys 

xix. George Grace Wode 

June vi. Anne Suttle 

XX. Henry Coppinger sone of Robt. 



August xiij. 

xxiij. 

September iij. 

December xxx. 

fFebruarie xxv. 



Maye j. 
xxiiij. 

September xvj. 

November xviij. 

December iiij. 

November xxv. 

December xxiij. 

Januarie xiij. 

xiij. 



Henry ffrancys 
Dericke 
Ambrose Clyve son of George 
John Brydges 
Robt. Rust 

Anno Domini 1582. 

Dyna Sponer 

Anne Hart 

Jone Bradstret [ 

Thomas Baker sone of Henry [ 

Robt. Salter sone of John Jun' j 

Will. Coppinger 

Agnes Murton '\ 

Ann Richer daughter of John [ 

Anne Kysse I 

Thomas Curtesse 1 



\ Baptyscd. 



iptised. 



Anno Domini 1583. 

March xxxi. Ruthe Salter Baptysed. 

August xvij. Wedow Crosse Buried. 

September xxij. John Suttle ^ 

October xiij. Margarett Martyne .- Baptysed. 

November xvij. Anthony Rycher J 

December viij. Eliz. Harlinge Buried. 

viij. Susan Salter daughter of John 

Januarie xxij. Jane Salter daughter of John Sen" 

xxij. Agnes Wode 

ffebruarie ix. Thomas Doggett ^ 

March xxij. Thomas Bramys sone of Thomas Junior Bapty: 



Bapty: 



Anno 'Do 



1584. 



March xxv. Mary ffrancys 

Maye xxvij. Thomasyne Randall 

vij. George Wcstapp 

November iiij. Penelope Salter \ Baptysed. 

viiij. Dorothie and Jone Clerke 

xvij. Anthony Coppinger 

December vj. Ann Skotte 

ffebruarie xiiij. Edmond Alygood and ffayth Games maried. 

March xxj. Anne Alygood alias Games Baptysed, 



The Parish Registers 



255 



Aniio Domim 1585. 



Maye 
Jun 



Jane Curtesse "| 



Henry Chu 
John Mann 



:h/ 



Baptysed. 



?e and Thomasin 



<cr 1 



July xxxi. Thomas Rycher and Margret Bertt 

August iij. John Osburne Buried. 

October x. Annanius Smyth Baptysed. 

xxviij. William Raynolde Buried, 

xxxj. Jane Thostingson Baptysed. 

September v. Marke Salter and Jone Syre maried. 

November xxj. Susan Levytt 

December xxviij. Susan Coppinger 

ffebruaric ij. Grcgorye Salter Buried. 



Baptysed. 



A7ino Domini I586. 

Maye iiij. William Vcyscy Baptysed. 

xix. Henry IVIore and Prudence Murto mar. 

June V. Ann Beamys daughter of Thomas Ju ' 

xij. Cristian Church 

xij. Susan Smyth 

August xiiij. Rich. More sone of Henry 

October ij. George Bumstead 

Januarie xv. Hellen fFrancys 

March vij. Lyonell Salter 



March xxvj. 

Maye xiij. 
August xxiiij. 
September ij. 



Anno Domini 1587 
Dorothye Baker > 



Agnes Dericke 
Alice Randall 
Judithe Coppinger 
fFebruarie xj. Jane Williamson 
fFebruarie xxv. Jone Goldinge 



Baptysed. 



Jnno Do 



1588. 



Aprill viij. 

viij. 

June xxix. 

September xv. 

October xxxj. 

Januarie ij. 

xij. 

xxix. 

ffebruarie ij. 

March xxiij. 



Robt. Martyn 
Edward Bramys 
William Tayler J 
ffrancys Kyttle Baptysed. 
Rich. Lucus Buried. 
Agnes Baker Buried 
Robt. Coppinger 
George More 
Henry Salter 
Alice Derick 
Thomas Church 



Baptysed. 



Baptysed. 



256 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Maye iij. 
xiiij. 

XV. 

Julye xviij. 

xxiiij. 

October v. 

November ix. 

December xxv. 

Januarie xxv. 

March viij. 



March xxv. 
Aprill ix. 

XX vj. 

Maye vj. 

vij. 

December xij. 

Januarie xviij. 

ffebruarie xxiiij. 

xiiij. 

xiiij. 

March xiiij. 



Atino Domini 1589. 



John Abell \ 

Jone his wyfe 

Jone Maior \ 

Agnes Martine 

Henry Spynkc j 

John Actor "j 

Thomas Smyth J 

Thomas Sowgate 

John Taylcr 

— Sturpe daughter of W 



jried. 



Baptysed. 
Juried. 



Baptysed. 



Anno Domini 159O. 
William Goldinge Baptysed. 
Jane Brydges Buried. 
Edward Church 

Umphry Brydges Basse sone of Ja 
Dorothie Bramys Buried. 
Edward Leach 
Beatrice Rudland 
Susan More 
Abigaile Wade 
Weneffrid Bond 
Edward Kettle 



Baptysed. 



Bapt 



Aprill V. 

V. 

Maye ij. 

ix. 

Julye iiij. 

August j. 

xviij. 

xviij. 

October x. 

November j. 

Januarie xvj. 

iFebruarie xxviij. 



Anno Domini 159I 
Isack Warde 
Henrye More 

John Bradstret [- Baptysed 
Dorothie Robson 
John Sowgate 
George Austen 

Jone Martyne wyfe of Thomas 
John More sone of John 
Thomas Manninge ^ 

John Baker son of John 
Mathew Churche 
Susan fFolkes 



ptys 



Baptysed. 



Anno Domini 1592. 
Maye xxj. Roger Goldinge 
xxviij. Andrew Lucus 

xxj. Roger Goldinge ~| 

xxviij. Andrew Lucus J P X^'^ • 

June iiij. John Salter and Agnes Percust 

Julye ij. John Andrewe and Alice Leach 

Ann Hunger Buried. 



August xiij. 
September xxix. 

October iij. 

Januarie vj. 

fFebruarie xj. 



The Parish Registers 



257 



Eliz. Browne 
Thomas Tayler 
Eliz. Andrewes 
Henry Osburne 
Eliz. Smyth 



Baptysed. 



Aprill j. 

June j. 

Julye xxix. 

June 8. 

August xix. 

xxxj. 

October x. 

xi. 

xxj. 

Vovember xviij. 

December xix. 

Januarie xiij. 

XXX. 

ffebruarie iij. 
March ix. 



Baptysed. 



Anno 'Domini 1593. 

Susan Church Baptysed. 

John Cremc and Dorothic Syre maried. 

John Brydges Buried. 

Agnes Salter 1 

John More sone of - 

Susan Bramys 

Thomas Skarpe ) 

John Whyte and Eliz. Bradstret ") 

John Bennett and fFrancis Sowgate J 

Myrable Martyne ^ 

Nycholas Osborne ,- Baptysed. 

Robt. Baker J 

John More sone of Henry Baptysed. 

GefFery Blindes and Thomasyne Bert 

Marke Salter Baptysed. 

William Capron Buried. 



Japtyscd. 



Anno 'Domini 1594- 

Aprill ix. William Salter 

xxj. John Crearae 

Maye v. Margret Bumstead 

June ix. Anne Munninge 

ix. Margret Butcher 

September xxviij. Eliz. Noone 

xxix. George Andrewes 

November x. Eliz. fFolkes 

December x. Bryggett Lucus 

xiij. Marke Goldinge 

xxxi. Jane Osborne 

Januarie xvi. Eliz. Wade 

ffebruarie iij. Mark Salter 

xviij. Thomas Church 

XX. Rich. Humphry and Mary Salter maried. 

xxij. Eliz. Blyndcs Baptysed. 

xxviij. Thomas Doggctt Buryed. 



Anno 'Domini 1595- 



March XXX. Mothew Lucus ) 



Aprill 



Anne Mutton J 



34 



2s8 



History of the Parish of Buxhall. 



April xviij. 

xxvij. 

Maye j. 

xviij. 
June iij. 



Catherine Smyth 

Penelope Salter daughter of Tho. 

John Bramys sone of Thomas Jur 

Thomas fFrancys 

Brygett Lucus ^ R ' rf 

William Syre th'elder j ""^ " 



September iiij. Sarauell Salter "| 
xiiij. Susan Murton J 



December xxj. 

xxj. 

xxij. 

Januarie iiij. 



aptysed. 

Thomas Stannard and Ayre Goodwf 
John Hartinge and Alyce Lyvett 
Thomas Butcher "j 
Ann Derick , Baptysed. 

John Gylbcrt j 



fFebruarie ij. 
xiij. 



Anno 'Do. 
Anne Tayler "( 



Roger Powellye J 
Jeffrye Creame Buried 



1596. 

Baptysed. 



Anno 'Domini 1597' 



March V. 

Aprill X. 

xvij. 

Maye xxij. 

xxiiij. 

June V. 

September xj. 



October vj. 

xxiij. 

November v. 

December xiiij. 

fFebruarie xix. 

xxviij. 

xxviij. 



Baptysed. 



Alyce Baldry 

Rich. Pylbarrow 

Thomas Goldinge 

Susan Copsey j 

Thomas Salter "1 

Calebbe Wade - Baptysed. 

Lydya ffolkes J 

Catherine Leach Buried. 

George Creme Baptysed. 

Rich. Leach Buried. 

Eliz. Martine Baptysed. 

Rich. Bennett Buried. 

George Muskett and Rosse Brock maried. 

Eliz. Salter J _ , 

Baptysed. 



Dorothie Whytt 

Nicholas Heiward and Wed' 



Rusk 



Anno 'Dom. 
1 



Baptysed. 



Aprill xviij. Henry Gylbert 

xviij. Sylvester Blyndes J 

September x. John Doggett baptysed. 

xvj. An Taylor buried, 

xviij. Roger Robson baptised. 

fFebruarie xj. Thomas Andrewes "j 

xj. iFrauncis Creme - baptysed. 

XX. Henry Muskett j 



The Parish Registers 



259 



,Jniio Do 



1599. 



August xiiij. 

October viij. 

September 23. 

November 2. 

fFebruary v. 

Marche 2. 



Dorothie Churchc 

Prudence Moore 

Henry Sowgate and Rose his wyfe 

William Lucas babtysed. 

Jane Wade A 

Gregory Taylor 

John Brundishe 

Ambrose Rudlands 



buried. 



baptyscd. 



Juno Do 



1600. 



Maij j. 
June 29. 


Thomas Osburnc bapised. 
Robt. Rydnall 
Wedowe Murtou 


July 14. 

September 16. 

22. 

24. 


Agnes Spinke - Buried. 

Thomas Salter 

Ursula Bridges '' 

Robt. Wade and Phebe Pearson maried 


14. 

October 19. 


Thomas Goulde ~| 
Elizabethe Wade [ '°'^'^-''^- 



Anno Do 



16OI. 



Aprill 13. Elizabethe Sowgate baptised. 

June 21. Thomas Cricke and Elizabeth Smyth 

September 12. Thomas Bugg and Eliz. Bradstret 

October 4. Robt. Bond and Mary Jewett 

September 27. Elizabeth Robson J 

September 30. Eliza Bert and Katharine Osborne j 

Januarie 25. Judithe Raynam 

S. Aldwie Martine 

February 5. George Beamire }- baptyscd. 

November 25. Jane Salter 

October 11. Alice Thomson 



1602. 



Aprill 28. 


Elizabeth Baldwin 


July xi. 


Anne Bugge 


February 13. 


James Crick 


October 3. 


Thomas Sowgate 


13- 


Marye Wade 


June 27. 


Robt. Murton 


Marche 23. 


Hellen Muskctt 


Aprill 26. 


Anne Studde 


December 21. 


Susan Gilbortc 



f bapt\ 



zbo 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



buried. 



November 17. Anne Whitlockc 

December 9. Wcdowe Smythe 

January 25. Mary Lucus 

February 10. Anne Doggett I 

Marchc 6. he Murton J 

February 2. John Studd and Abygaile Pinson 



20. Daniell Richer and Anne Burndishe | 



J/ifio Do 



1603. 



XXX. 

August 7. 

September 25. 

25. 

26. 

October 9. 

November 9. 

December 25. 

25. 

26. 

January 8. 

17- 

20. 

Marche 4. 

5- 
1604. 25. 



Aprill 15. 

2+. 

May X. 

June xxiiij. 
August 23. 

5'" 
September 2. 
December 2. 

xiij. 

xvj. 

September 29. 

December 23. 

January 13. 

ft'cbruary 2'' 

17. 

Marchc 3. 

4- 



John Margera and Elizabeth Doe maried 

Hellen Willson buried. 

John Robson and Margaret Ridnall 1 

Henry Barton and Jane Salter J 

Daniell Richer baptyscd. 

Sym's Condall and Thomasin Salter maried. 

Hellen Muskett ~j 

John Grigges . baptysed. 

Jone Wade J 

The wife of John Rayna ^ 

Jone Wade 1 buried. 

Walter Kissc J 

John Stockdalde and Anne Skotte maried. 

Eliz. Muskett baptyscd. 

George Sargeant "j 

Susan Gilbert. ,- buried 

Vxor Georgii Beamirc j 

Jnno Domini l604- 
William Cxonson ^ 
George Dickins 
Thomas Creme 



ed. 



baptised. 



John Salter J 

Robt. Salter -i 

Anne Woode - buried. 

John Robson J 

Eliz. Barton baptised. 

Richard Kempe and Catharine Thomson maried 

John Gierke | _ 

William Robson J ^ 

Jane Webbe buried. 

Thomas Myllcr \ 

Richarde Gosse , . , 
buried. 
Henry Wade 

ftrauncys Sparkc J 

Henry Sowgate and Mary Drak maried. 

Rachacl Gussc buried. 

John Studde baptised. 

John Studde J 

Anne Studde I 



buried. 



The Parish Registers 



261 



May 5. 
13- 

25- 

25- 
June 28. 

23- 

July 8. 

September 29. 

November 29. 

7- 

November 23. 

Januarie 5. 

24. 

25- 

ffebruarye 9. 

24. 



buried. 



Anno Domini l6o5' 

Umfrey Taylor ") , . , 

i\,r u J ■ baptized. 

Margrett Hayvvarde | "^ 

William Robinson 1 

Wedowe Spink ) 

lohn Grymsey and | . , 

,^ -1, ■ maried. 

Margaret May ) 

William Crick baptized. 

Margret Burrowe buried. 

John Hyem and Grace Woode maried. 

William Grigges 

John Wood 

Margaret Strutte 

Margarete Sowgate 

John Lucas 

Alice Andrewes ~j 



baptized. 



buried. 



Alice Grymsey J 

Henry Cock and Anna Smythe maried. 
2. Catharine Studde baptized. 
Marche 29. Mary Losse buried. 



1606. 



25. 


John Raynam baptized. 






Aprill 29 


Joan Salter \ 

Henry Sowgate th'elder - buried. 

Thomas Maken J 






May 4 






23 






25 


Henry Cocke baptized. 






July 13 


Alice Glesinge baptized. 






September 7 


Thomas Marten ~1 , . , 






November 5 

5 


Susan Maior J '"'"'^• 
Susan Maior bapized. 






December 10 


Henry Cocke 1 , ■ , 
Ti J n- 1. buried. 
Prudence Richer J 






Aprill 6 






Marche 7 
•5 


Mary Lucas "| , . , 
Robt. Syer J bapuzcd. 

Anno Domini 1607. 






June 14 


Sara Wade 








26 


Penelope Clarke 








25 


George Strutte 








July 28 


Judithe Raynam 


■ baptized. 






September 27 


Margrete Crick 


Richard Clarke 


baptized 


Octob 


25 


Margarete Jackson 


9. 


1607. 




29 


William Sowgate > 









262 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



5- 


Alice Strubbe buried. 


January 2. 


Margarete Osburne ] 


3. 


Joane Paricarde J 


ffcbruary 2. 


Henry Sowgate ^ 


2. 


ffraunces Goddarde 


7. 


Anne Haywardc 


14. 


Ambrose Tayler 


24. 


John Maken 


7. 


Ely Hyem 


25- 


Thomas Makinc '' 



baptized. 



Anno Domini 16IO. 



IVIay 24. Walter Murton 

June 17. Rebecca Sowgate 

August I. Thomas Birdc ! baptized. 

5. George Syer 

ffebruary 29. Thomas Grigges 

July vj. Eliz. Murton 

September 16. Anne Osburne 

November 22. Alice Osburne J- buried. 

December 3. Thomas [Penninge] 

January 30. John ribbe 

June vj. Samuel Smythe and Susan Mahowe | 

Januarie 25. John Smythe and Anne Salter / 

25. Robt. Salter. 



Anno Do 



161I. 



Mar. 22. John Murton 

Mar. 30. Robt. Salter 

May 23. Thomas Wade 

24. Edwarde Smythe 

26. Edmond Trickcr 

June I. Eliz. Creme 

g. Richarde Hyem 

September 29. John Sowgate 

December 7. ffraunces Losse 

Ja. 29. Richarde Losen 

Mar. 22. John Murton 

Sept. II. Em. Sowgate 

December 27. Robert Beamin 

Ja. 29. Ux' Johis Rayna 

febr. 14. Stephe Ridatall J 

Sept. 22. William Wade and Mary Turnc 

November 30. Thomas Penninge and Margaret Bird 

30. Thomas Smythe and Eliz. Pcnne 



baptized. 



buried. 



The Parish Registers 



263 



Anno Domini l6l2. 



June 1+. 


Wiljiam Sowgate 






21. 


ffraunces Syre 




July 22. 


Richard Birde 




Sept. 22. 


William Nun 




Octob. II. 


Mary Poole 




Novemb. 30. 


John Wade 


baptized. 


Decemb. i. 


Dorothy Creme 




22. 


Edward Nunne 




Ja. 29. 


Judith Barton 




febr. 7. 


Martyne Smythe 




Mar. 21. 


Dorothy Hycni 




May 17. 


Robt. Ranson and 


An Wade 


29. 


Robt. Marten and 


Dorothy Robson 


July 5. 


Jo. Kinge and Eli 


I. Dickenson 


Aug. 16. 


Joe Wade and Ruthe Salter 


October 24. 


Ge. Dickenson an 


i Judith Kinball 


Apr. 25, 161 3. 


John Gloson and 


Eliz. Kinge 


Apr. 1612, 22. 


Eliz. Dickenson 






May 7. 


Wedowe Marten 






June 12. 


Agnes Salter 






21. 


John Baker 




■ Buric 


November 2. 


John Bradstrete 






febr. 25. 


John Marten and An. Bart 




Mar. 29. 


Martyne Smythe 


. 






Anno 


Domini 1613. 


May 23. 


Martyne Wade 




June 9. 


Ely Salter 




20. 


Thomas Smythe 




22. 


John Salter 




22. 


Judithe Trickcr 


- baptized. 


July 9. 
'3- 


Richarde Syre 
Richarde Grigges 




25- 


John Strutte 




September 22. 


Martha Wade 




June 29. 
September 22. 


Richarde Smythe 
Ely Barton 


- buried. 


28. 
October 16. 


Abigaele Studdc ^ 
Ely Powley [ 


buried. 


28. 


Jane Rushe 


'- baptized. 


November 7. 


Thomas [Martine] 


8. 


Anne Smythe 


J 


7- 


Abraham Coricke 
Smythe 


• maried. 


December 22. 


William Salter bap 


tized. 


January 4. 


Ely Syre buried. 







264 



History of the Parish of Buxhal 



January 8. 


Susan buried. 




16. 
February 2. 


John Raudland 1 , . ^ 
Mary Caufforde / ^'P''^'^' 


9- 


Rebecca Smythe mar. 


March g. 


Robt. Martync ~| . 
-. r u r baptized. 
Margaret Smythe J '^ 


13- 




Anno Domi/ii 1614. 


July 22. 


John Chondry 




Sept. 23. 


Prudence Umfrey 




Novemb. 25. 


John Smythe 


baptized. 


Decemb. 20. 


Mary Birde 




22. 


Margaret Penninge 




^7- 


Bridget Wade 




Novemb. 28. 


Eliz. Clarke maried 


October 7. 


John Creme | 




William Jewer J ^ ^' 


Mar. 31. 


Sara Nunne 161 5 \ 


Sept.' 4. 


Jane Harling | ^^.^^_ 


2. 


Jane Holife j 
Marke Salter j 


7- 


Novem. 9. 


The wife of Tobias Branson \ 
Robert Derrick | , 


fFebr. 20. 


idem. 26. 


Margaret Rise I 
Thomas Baker J 


March 8. 


Sept. 3. 


Daniel] Pool ' 


Novem. 30. 


Robert Richer 


ffebrua. 18. 


William Wade - baptized. 


idem. 2?. 


Brigett Richen 


March 17. 


Mathew Bull 


Novemb. 10. 


Edmund Jacob and \ 




Sara Stevens. J 




I616. 


Juli 8. 


Alice Crosse ^ 




Octob. I. 


Richard Grigge 




Novem. ig. 


Jone Clerk wid. 




Decem. ig. 


Dorithe Murton 


Buried. 


idem. 25. 


Robert Crosse 




jaun. 25. 


Margaret Penning 




March 17. 


Thomas Coulson 




August 4. 


Thomas Pilborough ^ 


Septem. 4. 


Anthony Salter 




idem. I I. 


Briget Jacob 




idem. 18. 


William Wade 




idem. 25. 


Ann Wade 


' Baptized. 


Octob. 7. 


Thomas Penning 




Decemb. 3. 


Elizabeth Smith 




January 25. 


Grace Birde 





buried 



The Parish Registers 



265 



Aprill 26. 
May 7. 



Julys 
August 31 



May 12. 

28. 

30- 

June 2. 

7- 

9- 

16. 

July 12. 

28. 

August 4. 

September 20. 
3°- 

November 24. 

29. 

January 19. 

25. 

ffebruary 8. 

March 20, 1619. 



March 7. 
14. 
19. 

30. 
Aprill 18. 



May 
Jun 



buried. 



Anno 'Domini 1617. 

Isble Silvester 

John Wade 

John Pilburrow 1 . , 

•' , „ ^ ,,• f maricd. 

and Susan Cullington J 

Elizabeth Bret 

Elizabeth Annes 

Phillip Chenery 

Aldsey Wade 

John Masham 

Grace and Anne Losse 

Jlnno Tlomini 1618. 
The widow Martyn buried. 
Thomas Jacob Babtized. 
William Coulson and Jone Clarice maried. 
Jane Smalle 
Richard Peclc 
Susan Murton 
Margaret Rudland 
Robert Baicer 
Richard Grigges 
Elizabeth Copinger the daughter of Mr. William 

Copinger 
William Kingc 
John Jacob 
Richard Sier 
Thomas ffenne and 

Margaret Brett 
John fFookes "I 

Prudence Hagger J 
William Bell buried. 
Roger Smith babtized. 
Mr. George Dickenson somi 

ffiftie yeeres and now 

patet &c. 

I618. 



babtized. 



cd. 



babtized. 



tyme Parson of Buxall by the space of 
lieth buried in the Chancel there ut 



Babtized. 



Edmond Shusork ■! 
Margaret Penninge J 
William King 
Anne Fapraan j 
Elizabeth Toulson Babtized. 



ied. 



The Widow 
Ursula King 
Samuel Ranson 



Anno 'Domini 1619. 
Sowgate 



IS 



266 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



August 8. 


Jane Pilbarrow s 




i8. 


George Pilbarrow and Salter 




19. 


Thomas Martyne 






John Osbournc 


■ Babtized. 


22. 


ffrances Thorndicke 


December I. 


Margaret Wade 




25. 


William Baker 




26. 


John Martin ■' 




Mar. 18. 


The Wedow Benet buried. 


25. 
26. 


WUliam Kmg | ^^^.^^^_ 
Elizabeth fFookes J 


Aprill 19. 


Thomas Tayler buried. 




Jmo 'Domini 1620. 


May 26. 


Sarah Kimbolde \ 


July 20. 


Mary Hogges 


August 6. 


Sarah Jacobe \ baptized. 
Elizabeth Smith f 


October 8. 


30. 


Robert Murton 




Anne Cunicole , 


December 10. 


John Osborne 


13- 
March 10. 


Judith Copinger 1 
Walter Yonges bast, j ^ 


April 2. 


John Pilbarow 


Aprill 26. 


The Widow Fenike ^ 

The wife of Robert Goddard , . , 
'- buried. 


September 30. 


October i. 


John Seanster j 
Richarde Woode J 


December 20. 


July 20. 
October 30. 


Annanias and Elizabeth Wckum "j . 
William Cunicole and Anne Tayler j 




J;!no Domini 162I. 


April 22. 


Susanna Jacob ^ 


June 8. 
24. 


John Coulsonne 1 

William Pilbarrow j baptized. 


24. 


John Pcele 


26. 


Henry Coppinger the sonn of William Coppinger 


July II. 


William Sier 




Thomas Bracket 


November 18. 


Dorothie Penninge 


25- 


Margaret Smeith 


December 2. 


Susanne Baker 


8. 


Saraucll Kimbull 


February 17. 


Robert Osborn 


17- 


Robert Kinge 


March 5. 


Jone Moortham 


622. April 14. 


John Wade 


28. 


Richard Godwood 


J 



baptized. 



The Parish Registers 



267 



November 2. 

August 26. 

September ig. 

October 31. 

ffebruary 9. 

March 25. 

July 17. 

August 8. 



The Widowe Salter 
Thomas Bracket 
Simon Maye 
William Kinge 
The wife of Simon Rafe 
Robert Salter 
John Tayler 
Robert Godward and 
Thomasinne Pilbarrow 
William Salter and 
Rose Downinge 



May 4 

22 

October 19 

November 13 

January 30 



June 18. 

July 28. 

September 11. 

October 6. 

December S. 

february 16. 

March 9. 

Aprill I 5. 

february 19. 



Anno '■Domini 1623. 
The wife of John Jacob 
The wife of ffransis Powell 
Audrey Martine \- buried. 

The wife of Richard Ken 
Robert Baker 

1623. 

Richard Martine 

Francis Rushe 

Anne Jacob 

Edmund Griggcs 

Mary Smith \ babtized. 

Andrew Pollcw 

Robert Smalle 

William and Margret ffookcs 

Thomas Pilbarrowe 

Simon Ralfe and Margcre Heyward ^ 

George Knopc and y' Widdow Allexander J 



Anno Domini 1623, 
May 12. William Godard 
August 7. Thomasin Coppinger 
October 12. Mary Wade 
November 9. Susan Smith \ baptized. 

December 20. John Gie 
January 12. Anne Slipper 

March 7. Margret Kimbull 
August 27. The wife of John Studd' 
November 24. Daniel Childe 
December 18. The widowe Baker 
September 25. Robert Baker and 
Briget Bird 
October 19. John Jacob and 
Catherine Rose 



I 



268 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



October 14. 

17- 
December 8. 

December 12. 

Januarie g. 

14. 

februarie 14. 

June 5. 



baptized. 



baptised. 



fried. 



buried. 



1624 

Aprill 7. Daniell Worth baptised. 
September 19. Thomas Raphe \ 

29. Phebe Jacob 

George Motham 

John Baker 

William Coppinger gentleman the sonn of Mr. W\ 

Coppinger 
Susan Smith 
Andrew Smith 
Elizabeth Grimwood 
Phebe Osborne 
William Grimward and 
Elizabeth Bantocke 
July 28. Thomas Osborne and 
Alic Thomson 
August 31. Richard Kempe and 
Susan Gayfor 
The widdow Benit \ 
John Grigges 
Margaret Sowgate 
Tomissinge Lucas 
Richard Kempe I 

The widdow Ealie / 
Jone Salter widdow buried when she had lived in the favor of God 

and all good people Ixxi yeares. 
Thomas fokes was baptized. 
John Goddard. 
Robarte Baker. 
Robarte Slepper. 
Margrete Pilbarrough. 
Ambrose Salter. 

Elizabeth Osbourne daughter of Thomas Osborne baptized December xvith 1625. 
Samucll Phillips baptized febr viij 1627. 

Elizabeth Pilborrowe daughter of Thomas baptized februarye xxvjth 1627. 
July 7. John Woode and Mary Rush "| . , 

October 13. John Robson and Ann Pelbarrough J 
Ruthe Wade daughter of John Wade baptized March xith 1627. 
Thomas Crosse and Elizabeth Small maryed March xxiijth 1625. 
Susan Salter daughter of William baptized March xxvjth 1626. 
An Smyth daughter of Onamyes Smyth baptized Aprill second 1626. 
John Strutt buryed January the xiiij 1625. 
William Basem and An Jawer maryed February nynth 1625. 

[Deanc of Lavenham] buryed on the 22 [ — ] 1625. 



June 
July 
August 
October 


•7- 
Ji. 
zg. 


January 
Marche 


2. 
15- 


Aprill 


5- 


Aprill 


9- 


July 
August 
October 


7- 
23. 


November 


3- 



Mariages in Anno Domini 1626. 
Edward Baldrie and Jane Barton married Aprill 25, 1626. 
Robart Copinger gent and Margaret Griggs maried June 15, 1626. 



The Parish Registers 



269 



Buri„l/s in Anno Domini 1626. 
Elizabeth Hall buried. 

Susan Smith the wyffe of Samuel Smith buried. 
Ruth Wade y° wife of John Wade buried. 
The widdow Smith. 
Elizabeth White the wife of Mr. John White gent. 

Christenings in Anno Domini 1626. 
Samuell Smith y° sone of Edward Smith. 
John Robinson the sone of John Robinson baptized. 
Marie Jacob the daughter of Edmund Jacob 

Edmund Baldrie the sone of Edmund Baldrie baptized May 4, 1627. 
William Baltman Baptised the 20'" of May 1627. 
October 7. Robert Baker 1 „ . , 
„ 28. Thomas Kittle | ^^P'"<='^- 
November 4. Samuel Pilborrow baptized. 

Januarye. 
The 12 day ffrances Copinger daughter of William Copinger Esq. 



■uarie the 15"'. 


Mr. Syer mariage to Cathren Osborne. 


Marche 16. 


William Small. 


Aprill first. 


Buried William Mootsam. 


November 1 1 . 


Thomas Baker. 


Mariage of Sii 


r Thomas Brekingham Knight and Jone Rinck ye .... Me 




Burialls 1627. 


June 26. 


Georg Knop was buried. 


Julie 20. 


Thomas Sire „ 




November. 




The 23 Jane Rush wyfe of Edward Rush. 




Ajino Domini 1628. 


Maij 15. 


Susan Martin 1628 baptyzed. 


September 26. 


Marye Copinger daughter of Mr. Robt. Copinger baptized. 


September 14. 


John Whyte baptyzed. 


October 12. 


John Heves baptyzed. 


December 6. 


Sara Joye. 


December 13. 


John Batcman. 


November 12. 


Marye Worthe. 


October 21. 


Marye Wade. 


Januarie 8. 


Jane Wood baptyzed Henry ffoakes and An iFoakes. 


Januarye 22. 


John Grymwood. 


ffebruarye 4. 


An Salter. 


fFebruarye 14. 


Marye Smyth. 


Marche. 


Susan Jacob. 




Anno Domini 1629. Christenings. 


April .7. 


Ann Syer. 


May 7. 


William Pilbarrow. 


May 21. 


Elizabeth Salter. 


May 28. 


Elizabeth Smyth. 



270 



History of the Parish of Buxhall 



Buryalh 1628. 
im Sowgatc July 



July 30. Elizabeth Cr 



April 15. 

July 28. 

September 30. 



June 28. 

August 4. 

Novemb. 22. 

January 5. 

March 4.. 

17- 



Sept. 
Febu. 



Manages 1628. 
John Wood and Marrie Ralph. 
Robert Salter and Margrett Jower. 
Symon Johnson and An Smyth. 

Anno Domini 1629. Christenings. 
William Motham the sonne of John Motham. 
John Baker the sonne of Robt. Baker of Fen Street. 
Gosse the sonne of William Gosse. 

Dorethie Barton the daughter of Elizabeth Barton Base Borne. 
Robert Bateman the sonne of William Bateman. 
Margaret Copinger the daughter of Robart Copinger gentl. 

Manages X629. 
Richard Jarsraan and Ester Wood. 
Richard Pettit widdower and Anne Badcocke singl. 



Burialls 1629. 
Julie 25. Anna Stud the wife of John Stud. 

Christenings 163O. 

June 28. William Motham sone of John Motham. 

August 4"". John Baker sone of Robt. Baker of ffen Street. 

November 22"''. Gosse sonne of Mr. Gosse. 

Januaryc 5"*. Dorethye Barton daughter of Elizabeth Barton base borne. 

March 4"'. Robt. Bateman sonne of Mr. Bateman. 

March 17. Margrett Copinger daughter of Robt. Copinger gent. 

Mariages. 

September 21". Rychard Jarsman and Ester Wood, 
ffebruarye 2"''. Rychard Pcttett and Anne Badcocke. 

Babtixed September 16, X63O. 
Mary Copinger the daughter of William Copinger Esq™ was borne the third day 

of September in the yeare of our Lord six hundred and thirty and babtized 

the sixteene day of the same moneth. 
Jane Wad daughter to John Babtized October 19, 1630. 

Christenings 163I. 

Robt. sonne of Edward baptized May viiij*. 

Thomas Worth sonne of John Maye 22°''. 
Marey Pilborrow daughter Tho. June 10'". 



The Parish Registers 271 



An Copynger daughter of M'- Robt. Copinger August third. 

Marey Grceme daughter of John 27"' of July. 

John Baldey sonne of John September second. 

An Bennett daughter of William September the 5'". 

Edmund Jacob sonne of Edmund October 16"'. 

Elizabeth and An Skarfe daughter of Martin Skarfe December 18. 

An Pilborrow daughter of William December 24. 

George Bird sonne of George December 23. 

Thomas and John Sowgate sonnes of An Sowgate base borne februarie 19"' 

Rebecca Smyth daughter of Ananyas Smyth March 1 1"'. 

Peter Syer sonne of William March 16"'. 

Rose Jarsman daughter of Rych. Aprill Second. 

Rychard Martin sonne of Rye. februarye second 163 1. 

Marriages. 

John Wood and Ellin Webb Maye 17. 
William Webb and Jane Wood July 8"". 
John Kinge and Susan Pilborrow Septemb. 8. 
John Heyward and ffrances Mickfield October 2"". 

Buryalls. 

Rychard Martin June the 8'". 

Symon Bennett July fifth. 

John Salter October 22"''. 

An Croft widow Januarye the first. 

Henry Lucas Januarye the 9"". 

Elizabeth Rafe widow Marche the I5'\ 

Thomas and John Sowgate sonnes of An februarie 23"". 

John Studd Marche the 29'". 1632. 

Christennings I632. 

The 7 of June Robt. Gey son of Mr. Gey. 

The 7 of October Thomas Guymwood sonne of John. 

The 4'" of Februarye Margrett Salter daughter of Robt. Salter. 

The 18 of December An Wye daughter of Mr. Wye. 

The 24 of Januarye Rychard Syer sonne of Henry Syer. 

The 7 of februarye William Cooke sonne of Mr. Cooke. 

The Marriages. 

The 16"' of februarye Henry Syer and An Studd. 
The 7 of June William Cooke and An Pilborrow. 
The lo"' of October Edmund Bctt and Mary Studd. 
The second of October Edward Edgar and An Elenson. 
The xi"' of October John Brett and Marye Bradberye. 
The 16'" of May and Rox Hust. 



272 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Buryalls. 

The xi"" day of Aprill William Batcman. 

The xx'" day of July Widow Stonham. 

The xi"* day of October Dyana Hatihett wyfc of Thomas Hatihett. 

The first of November An Poole wyfe of Rye. 

Ckristinings 1633. 

The le"- of May Hanna Osburne the daughter of Henery Osburne was Bapti : 

The 20 of June Matthew Motham the sonne of John Motham was Bapti : 

The 20 of November Edmund Wade the sonn of John Wayd was Bapti : 

The 3 December Rachell Wye the daughter of Richard Wye was Bapti : 

The 3 of January Elizabeth Jacob the daughter of Edmund Jacob was Bapti : 

The 24 of January Ann Greene the daughter of John Greene was Bapti : 

The 31 of January Mary Syer the daughter William Sier was Bapti : 
february the 2 Judith Copinger the daughter of Mr. William Copinger was Bapi 

The 13 of February Ann Hempson the daughter of Edward Hempson was Bapt 

The 22 of february Thomas Rush the sonn of Edward Rush was Bapt : 

The 25 of March Peter Deuereux the sonn of Mr. Peter Deuereux was Bapti 

The 25 of March Mary Salter the daughter of William Salter was Bapti : 

The 7 of Aprill Elizabeth Martin the daughter of Richard Martin was Bapti : 

The 9 of Aprill Susan Oruis y' daughter of Samuel! Oruis was Bapti : 

Marriages. 
May the 30. William Hoine and Rose Hurst were married. 
November the j. John Durrant and Ann He . . . U were married. 

Biirfings. 

The 4 of June Mary Lucas was Buried. 

The 31 Rose Jacob the wyfe of John Jacob was Buried. 

The 8 of february Simon Rafc was Buried. 

Ckristnmges 1634. 

May the 27"'. Mary Cooke the daughter of William Cooke was baptiz : 

July the 30. Judith Worth the daughter of John Worth was baptiz : 

August y" 17. John Mole y° sonne of Thomas Mole was baptiz : 

Septem. 28. Elizabeth Euersome the daughter of Thomas Euersome was baptiz : 

October 27. Robert Salter y" sonne of Robert Salter was baptiz : 

february the i. William Wye the sonne of Richard Wye was Baptiz : 

febru. the i. William Hayward the sonne of John. 

March y' 28'". William Sier the sonne of Henry was bapt : 

Marriages. 
July the 25"". Nicolas King and Elizabeth Janning were married. 
August the 21. Martin Scarfe and Rachell Weaver were married. 
October the 7. William Kimbe and Anne Ralfe were married. 



The Parish Registers 



273 



Burriiil/s. 

May 2o'\ Elizabeth Scarfe y' wyfe of Martin Scarfe was buried. 
November the 20"'. Richard Martine was buried. 

March the 3. Elizabeth Martine y' daughter of Richard Martine was bu 



Aprill 6. 

ApriU 19. 

October 27. 



15 June. 

19 of May. 

Novemb. 2 3 . 

January 2. 



Ma 



19 June. 
4 Septemb. 
18 Septemb. 



4 Decemb. 

9 Decemb. 
January j. 
March 23. 



Decemb. 9"'. 
Decemb. iii. 
March ii"". 



Christinings 1635. 
Elizabeth Fouler y' daughter of William Fouler was baptiz : 
Grace Syer the daughter of George Syer was Baptiz : 
Elizabeth Deueurux and Mary Deueurux y' daughters of Peter Devereux 
and Mary his wife were baptized. 

1636. Burialh. 
Edward Crosse was buried. 

Margarett OfFold y" wife of Edmund OfFold was Buried. 
Mary Deuereux y° daughter of Peter Deuereux was buried. 1635. 
Elizabeth Deuereux y' daughter of Peter Deuereux was buried 1635. 

Christmngs 1636. 
Edmund Hemson y° sone of Edward Hemson was baptized. 
Mary Bouarcher ye daughter of Eduard Bouarcher was baptized May 31. 
Samuel Smith ye sonne of John Smith was baptized. 
Susan Wade ye daughter of John Wade was baptized. 
Rose Hobie ye daughter of Eduard Hobie was baptized. 

1636. Marriages. 
Charles Bennitt was married May 16. 
George Corkesedge was married 23 of June. 

1636. Christinings. 
Elizabeth Wye y" daughter of Richard Wye gentleman and Ann his 

wife was baptized. 
Ann Deuereux was Baptized. 

William ffowler ye sonne of William ffowler was baptized. 
John Dean son of Rafe Dean. 

Buryalls 1636, 
Mary Deuereux ye wife of Mr. Peter Deuereux was buried. 
Ales Dericke ye wife of Abraham Dericke was buryed. 
The widow Gosse was buried. 



1637. CIristinings. 
Aprill 23. Mary Hayward ye daughter of John Hayward was baptized. 
May 9'". Peter Syer ye sonne of Henry Syer was baptized. 
October j"". Thomasin Copinger ye daughter of Mr. William Copinger was baptized. 
October 29. Mary Rafe ye daughter of Thomas Rafe was baptized. 
Decembr. 13. Robert Davy the sonne of Robert Davy was baptized. 
March 11'". Sara Sowgate ye daughter of Thomas Sowgate was baptized, 
36 



2 74- History of the Parish of Buxhall 

March 1 8'". Livia Smith ye daughter of John Smith was baptized. 

ffrauncis Deuereux ye sonne of Peter Deuereux was baptized. 
William Worth ye sonne of John Worth was baptized. 

Marriages. 

August 23. John Phillips and Mary Bayford were married. 

Novemb' 4. Nicolas Stannard and Mary Rust were married. 
Novemb' 14. John Worth and Mary Bennitt were married. 
Novemb' 30. Thomas Sowgate and Bridgett Jacob were married. 

Buryalh. 
february 18'". William Maior was buried. 

Burials 1638. 
Aprill 21. Ann the daughter of Thomas Molde. 
Aprill the 23. Susan Kemball the wife of William Kemball. 
May I. Thomas Rush the sonne of Edward Rush. 

Christenings, 

May I. George Frost the sonne of William Frost. 
May 4. Philip Mould the sonne of Thomas Mould. 
May 27. Peter Martin the sonne of Peter Marten. 

Marriages. 
Aprill 25. Abraham Derick and Betterisse Sargent. 

Robert Hubbard and Mary Gwiling were married. 

Christenings 1638. 
Susan Boaurcher ye daughter of Jeames Boaurcher was baptized June 27. 

Wood ye of John Wood was baptized Novemb' 5"". 

Elizabeth Syer ye daughter of Henry Syer was baptized December 21''. 
John Clarke ye sonn of John Clarke was baptized Decemb' 21". 

Biirialts. 
William , Gy was buried September 6"'. 
Ann ye wife of William Kembe was buried Sepf 9"". 
Philip ye wife of Nathaniell Maulden was buried Octob' 25"'. 
Mary ye wife of Eduard Clarke was buried Novemb' ii"". 
The widow Strutt was buried Novemb' 27"'. 

1639. Burialls. 1639. 
John Pilborrow was buryed the last of Aprill. 
Edmond Jacob was buryed the 20"' of June. 
John Wade was buryed the 18"' of [uly. 
The widdow (Jsborne was buryed July 30. 
John Jacob was buryed August xij. 



The Parish Registers 275 



Robert Dauyes child was buryed October 27. 

George Sayers child was buryed Novcrab' 3. 

Peeles daughter was buryed Novemb'' vj. 

Thomasine Rudland was buryed March viij"'. 

Thomas Everson son of Edward Everson babtized November the viij 1640. 

Chrlitimngi l639- 
Dorothy Coxedge the daughter to George aud Mary his wife was baptized the 

seaventh of Aprill. 
Elizabeth Salter the daughter of William Salter and his wife was baptized the 7'" 

of Aprill. 
ffrancis Hayvvard the daughter of John Hay ward and his wife was Baptized the 19'" 

of Aprill. 
John Scarpc the sone of John Scarpe and his wife was Baptized the 9'" of Aprill. 
Anna Lanraer the daughter of William Lanmer was Baptized the 29"' of June. 
William Grimwood the sonne of John Griniwood was Baptized the 21" of July. 
George Wode the sonne of Widdow Wade Baptized Octob' 13"'. 
William Strutt ye sone of Elizabeth baptized November 7"^. 

ffowlers child named John baptized Decemb' 7. 

Susanna Keene was baptized ffebruary viij. 

Elizabeth Euersson daughter of Thomas baptized March ye 4."'. 

1640. 

Thomas Everson son of Edward Everson baptized November 8. 

William Greme and Elizabeth Leeuer were marryed the first day of May. 

Thomas MarierS and Susanna Bowker were marryed September the 20"'. 

Edward Clearke and Susanna Wade were marryed October the 28"'. 

John Sovvgatc and fFranccs Godard were marryed the third of Novemb'' 3. 

Mari Jacobs daughter of Sosan Jacob base born baptised Januerare the i 1643. 

Sept. 2 Thomas Bucke Esq. maryed to Elizabeth the daughter of William Copinger Esq. 

1644. Christenings. 
Marie Holder ye daughter of James and his wife bapt. Dec. 
Anna the daughter of Edward Eversham and Anna his wife baptiz : March 7"'. 
March 9. William the sonne of John Wade and Mary his wife. 
March 15. Mary the daughter of Robert Baker and Thomasine his wife. 

Ann the daughter of John and Lydia Smyth bab : the 14 of 
February 1 64.4. 

1645. 

April 6. Edmund the sonn of Robert Dauy and Anne his wife. 

April 12. Esther the daughter of John Welham and Mary his wife. 

May 13. Dorothie the daughter of John and iFrancis 

May 29. Stephen the sonne of Nathanael and Elizabeth Maiden. 

Septemb' 11. Lydia the daughter of John and Lydia Rudland. 

Septemb. 20. Mary the daughter of Thomas and ffrancis Sowgate. 

Septemb. 22. Richard the sonne of Edward and Susan Gierke. 



276 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

October 3. Edmund the soiinc of Thomas and Bridget Jacob. 

October 28. Thomas the sonnc of Thomas and Mary Osborne. 

Decemb. 17. Mary the daughter of William and Mary fFrost. 

Februar. 2. Thomas the sonne of John and Barbara Gierke. 

Februar. 15. Annie the daughter of John and Annie Smith. 

Memo that Robert the sonne of Robert and Martha Bowie was baptized at Brctc 
vpon the 4"' of March. 

Miiridges 1644. 
Thomas Sowgatc and ffrancis Manfeild was married Novemb' 30. 
Thomas Osborne and Mary Everson married Decemb'' 16. 

1644. 

May 26. Richard Horslyc of Edwardstonc to Jane King of this parish. 
Jane Coc daughter of John Coe was baptized the fifth of Apryl 1644. 

1644. Bury alii 
Do"'- Copinger hauingc bene Rector of Buxall about 25 yearcs was buried January. 
M"' Wy y° wife of Richard Wy gent, buryed October. 
Old Goddard a poure man buryed Jan. 12. 
Margarita Copinger buryed Jan. 17. 
Alice Wade widdowe was buried vpon the 5"' of March. 

1645. 

June 20"^. Robert Stoneham was buried. 
Septemb. 15. Simon Bennit the Elder was buried. 
October 23. ffrancis Bowie was buried. 
December 8. James the child of William (Toulcr. 

Christenings Anno 'Domini 1646. 

March 30. Ambrose the sonne of Tho. and Bridget Sowgatc. 

April 10"'. Robert the sonne of Robert and Hannah Richards. 

May I. Margaret the daughter of John and Mary Lanncr. 

May 24.. Elizabeth the daughter of Mr. ffrancis and Elizabeth Copinger. 

June 7"'. Richard the sonne of John and Mary Welham. 

June 21. Susan the daughter of Elias and Elizabeth Scoefield. 

August 2'"'. Elizabeth the daughter of Peter and Mary Martin. 

March 20"'. Margaret the daughter of John and Mary Wade. 



Buriah An 



1646. 



February 14"'. Jane the wife of William Webbe. 
February 24"^. Elizabeth the daughter of Robert Salter. 



Marriages 1646. 



James Copsy to Annie Scot April 6. 



The Parish Registers 



277 



Christenings Anno Domini I647. 

March 26. Mary the daughter of George and Mary Cocksedge. 

May 16. John the sonne of Edward and Susan Gierke. 

May 30. Mary the daughter of John and Annie Smith. 

May 30. Elizabeth the daughter of William and Elizabeth Offold. 

June 14. Susan the base daughter of Grace Losse. 

August 20. Mary the daughter of William and Mary ftrost. 

Septemb. 5. Sarah the daughter of Edward and Anne Euersham. 

Novemb. 8. Anne the daughter of Robert and Thomasin Baker. 

Decemb. 5. John the sonne of Raphe and Anne fFrost. 

Decemb. 29. Anne the daughter of Robert and Anne Dauy. 

Decemb. 25. Richard the sonne of William and Dorothy Kem. 

Fcbru. \'^. Elizabeth the daughter of Susan Morton base. 

Burials Anno Domini 1647. 
June ig"'. Edmund the sonne of Matthew Wade vviddowc. 
Octob. 10"'. Sarah the daughter of Edward Euersham. 
Octob. 27. Richard Syre of Combes. 

Februa. 20. Barbara the wife of John Gierke of Hitcham. 

Burials Anno Domini 1648. 
The widdow Lanner of Shelland July 23. 
August 26. Anne Jacob. 
October 3. William Sowgate. 
October 5. Thomas the sonne of John Wade. 
Nouemb. 23. Robert the sonne of William Sowgate. 
Nouemb. 24. Elizabeth the wife of Thomas Shepherd. 

Christenings Anno Domini 1648. 
May 5. Bridget the daughter of Thomas and Bridget Jacob. 
May 12. Mary the daughter of Robert and Hannah Richard. 
June 8. Margaret the daughter of John and Lydia Rudland. 
June 22. Robert the sonne of William and Susan Martine. 
October i. Sarah the daughter of Nathanael and Alie Maiden. 
Decemb. 3. Robert the sonne of Robert and Mary King. 
Decemb. 24. Thomas the sonne of John and Annie Smith. 
Febru. 23. Robert the sonne of Peter and Mary Martin. 
Thomas the sonne of Robert and Martha Bowie was borne vpon 
Sept. and baptized at Bretenham vpon the 25 of October. 



Burialls Anno 'Domini 1648. 
January 14"'. William Gopinger Esq. Lorde of the Mannor and Patron of y' 

Ghurch. 
Jan. 29"'. John Sowgate the sonne of William Sowgate. 
March 2. Edmund Offold. 



278 



History of the Parish of B 



ux 



hall 



Burials Anno Domini l649- 

April 7'\ William Holder. 

June 23. Susan the daughter of Grace Lossc. 

Novemb. 30. Mary the wife of Henry Reynolds. 

Deccmb..i8. Samuel the sonnc of Thomas Shepherd. 

March 13. Elizabeth the daughter of Henry Copinger Esq. 

March 19. Elizabeth the Relict of Richard Syer of Combe. 

'Burials Anno Domini I650. 
April 9. Sarah the daughter of Nathanacl Maiden. 
May 9. Eliah the child of Eliah Scocfield. 
May Susan Smith 

Christenings Anno Domini 1649. 

June 23. William the sonnc of John and Anne Taylour 

July 22. Thomas the sonne of Thomas and Bridget Sowgate. 

July 28. Mary the daughter of Mr. fFrancis and Elizab. Copinger. 

August 26. Mary the daughter of John and Mary Lanner. 

Dccemb. 25. Anne the daughter of John and Mary Gye. 

Janu. 15. Esther the daughter of John and Elizabeth King. 

March 15. Mary the daughter of Hugo and Jane Badcocke. 

March 24. Elisa the sonne of Eliiah and Elizabeth Scoefield. 

Christenings Anno Domini I65O. 

July 20. John the sonne of Thomas and Bridget Jacob. 

October 11. John the sonne of George and Mary Cocksedge. 

Novemb. 10'". Martha the daughter of William and Dorothy King. 

Novemb. 30"', Mary the daughter of Edward and Susan Clerke. 

Deccmb. 14"". Martha the daughter of Robert and Martha Bowie. 

Janu. 9. John the sonne of William Carpenter and Anne his wife. 

March 11. Elizabeth the daughter of John King and Elisab. his wife. 

12. William the sonne of William Martin and Susan his wife. 

Burials Anno Domini I650. 
Dccemb. 15'". Dorothy the wife of William Kimbe. 
January 7'". Samuel Smith. 
January 13. John y' sonne of William Carpenter Jun. 



Aprill 27. 
May 18. 
June 7. 
June 18. 



Christenings 165I. 
Nathaniel sonne of Nathaniel Molden and Alice his wife. 
John the sonne of Robert King and Mary his wife. 
John the sonne of Richard Ramphlin and Margret his wife. 
Aimy daughter of George Pilbrow and Aimy his wife. 



[5 entries faded, one a child of William Carpenter.] 



The Parish Registers 



Mary Copinger daughter of Henry Copinger Esqt 
2 Aprill 1652. 



id Mary his wif baptized 



Penellope Coppinger daughter of William Coppinger Parson of 

his wife borne Decembe 1 6th. 
John Bowie son to Henri Bowie was born May the 16, 1653. 



iuxall and Mary 



Register of all the Marriages Births and Burialls in the Parish of Buxall from the Nine 
AND Twentie Day of September in the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Six Hun- 
dred FiFTiE Three. 



We the Inhabbitants of Buxall have chose William Salltcr for Regester whose names 
are hereunder written — 

Henry Copinger. 
William Sycr 
George Cocksedge. 
William ffrost. 
John Grim wood. 
Richard Gage. 
Peter Bret. 
Richard Martin. 
Richard Bowie. 
&c. 



I doe approue of William Salter for Regies- 
tor and ye oath taken this date before 



George Grome. 



1653- 

Margret King daughter of John King and Elizabeth his wife borne November i, 
Richard Ramplin sone of Richard Ramplin and Margret his wife borne November 
Mary daughter of Henry Copinger gent, buried November 23. 
John son of William Carpenter and Ann his wife' borne November 27. 
Hannah Kembe daughter of William Kcmbe and Matheu his wife borne January 
Edmund Griggs and Mary Syer married March 21 it having been published tl 



Lords dayes namely the 12 of Feb 
the same. 
Thomas Pilborough son of Henry 
•653- 



nd the 



Pilborough and Anne hi 
1654. 



February and 28 of 



wife born March 20" 



Robert Smith buried Aprill 18. 

daughter of base borne May 21, 1654. 

Jemimah Syer daughter of Peter Sycr and Mary his wife born the twentie fift of 

March in the year one thousand six hundred fliftie and foure. 
Joseph Boule sonne of Robert Boule and Martha his wife born Aprill 8. 
Thomas Richar sonne of Robert and Ann his wife borne Aprill 24. 
Thomas Copinger sonne of William Copinger minister of Buxall and Mary his wife 

borne Aprill 27. 



2 8o History of the Parish of Buxhall 

The marriage between Robert Wade of Buxall sonne of Caleb Wade of Buxall and 
Elisabeth Godard daughter to the wife of Peter Bacher of Drinckston was 
published three Lords' dayes namely Aprill 27, and 30, and May 7 and was 
solemnised May 18. 
The marriage between Richard Lusher carpenter and Mary Carver was published 
three Lords' dayes namely May 28 June 4 and the 11 and solemnised 
June 15. 
Mary Rush daughter of William Rush and Margaret his wife borne May 10. 
Briget and Ann Shepheard daughters to Richard Shepheard borne June 27. 
Henry Copinger sonne of Henry Copinger Esqr. and Mary his wife borne July 2. 
Mary Jacob daughter of Thomas Jacob and Briget his wife borne August 13. 
Anne Shepheard .... Shepheard buried. 

Phebe Kendall .... July 4 died at 

Thomas Martin sonne to Thomas Martyn buried August 15. 
Thomas Lanan sonne to John Lanan buried August 27. 

Robert Racroft single man of Bilston and Susan Martyn widow to William Martyn 
of Buxall their intent of marriage was published July 23 and 30 and August 6. 
They were married September 27. 
The intended marriage between Thomas Vice singleman sonne of Thomas Vice of 
Baughton and Mary Godard singlewoman daughter to the wife of Antony 
Darkin of Buxall was published three severall Lord's Days namely the 20 and 
27 of August and the 3 of September and solemnised the 27 of September. 
The marriage intended between Henry Garnham single man servant to Robert 
Richer of Buxall and Susan Murton servant to Goodman Fuller of Felsum 
was published three severall Lord's days namely the 10 and 17 and 24 of 
September and solemnised the first October. 
Robert Martyn Buried Nov. 6. 

October 17. Grace Bugg daughter of Bugg and Grace his wife. 

October 20. Hanna Martyn son of Thomas Martyn and Hanna his wife. 
. . . . . . . . Bennett son .... elder borne. 

March 4. Elizabeth Wade daughter to Robert and Elisabeth Wade borne. 
March 20. John Sougate son to Thomas and Brigett Sougate borne. 

1654 Morriiiges. 
February 7. John Wright and Ann Pilbrow were married. 
February 17. William Heyward and Mary Tayiour were married. 
March 27 1655. Richard Shepheard and Elisabeth Tayiour were married. 

"Birth 1655. 

May 9. Joseph King son to Robert and Mary King was borne. 

October 19. Jonathan Boulc son to Robert and Martha Boule was born. 

October 6. William Death son to William Death was borne. 

December 7. Ralphe Frost son to Ralphc and Anne Frost was borne. 

October 2. Elisabeth Friend daughter to Richard was borne. 

October 10. Thomas Vice son to Thomas and Mary Vice was born. 

December 16. Hannah daughter to William and Jane Carpenter was borne. 



The Parish Registers 



281 



December 17. Elisabeth Ramplyn daughter to Richard and Margaret Ramplyn borne. 
January I. Elisabeth Bannock daughter to Henry and Elisabeth Bannock was 
borne. 
December 16. William son to William Copinger minister of Buxall and Mary his 
wife was borne. 
February 6. Elisabeth Shepheard daughter to Richard and Elisabeth Shepheard 
was borne. 
February 15. John son to John and Ann Wright was borne. 

February 22. Sarah the daughter of Thomas Blomfield gent, and Elizabeth his 
wife was borne and babtised the 28 of the same. 
March 15. John son of Edmund and Mary Griggs was borne. 
March 16. John and William Sowgate to John and Elizabeth King born. 

Marriages 1655. 
April] 30. Thomas Roude and Jane King were married. 
June 26. Edmunde Stephens and Elisabeth Eversome were married. 
September 11. George Boldry and Alse Webb were married. 

October 9. Anthony Mapole and Francis Tanney were married. 
Novem 29. John Eversome and Mary Mallepher were married. 

'Burielh 1655. 
June 2. Brigett the daughter of Richard and Ann Shepheard buried. 
August 14. William Frost buried at Halston. 
December 31. Robert Copinger gent, buried. 

March 17. The wife of George Sougate buried. 
August 20. The wife of Thomas Martyn buried. 

'Births 1656. 
Susan Kembe daughter to William and Martha Kembe borne Aprill 21. 
Peter Bennet son to William Bennet the younger and his wife borne 

June 8. 
Caleb son to John Wade and Rachell borne Octob. 6. 
Ellen Tottie daughter to John and Jane borne August 18. 

Elisabeth daughter to Henry Copinger Esqr. and Mary his wife borne November. 
Hannah daughter to Robert Richer and Hannah his wife borne December 20. 
Peter son to Thomas Jacob and Briget his wife borne Novcmb. 25. 
Mary daughter to John Eversome and Mary his wife borne January I. 

Marriages 1656. 
John Tottie and Jane Wood married May 28. 
Robert Lewes and ftan. Godard married August 18. 
George Sougate and Elisabeth Wattson married Apr. 12. 



Burialls 1656. 
John Musket buried March 28. 
Widow Sougate buried Aprill 25. 
Rose Salter wife to William Salter buried Oct. 25. 

37 



2^2 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Caleb Wade buried March 15. 

Elisabeth Sowgatc .... buried June . , . . 

The widow Bennett .... 

John King buried .... 9 

Edward Salter Decemb. 16. 

The widow Jacob Decemb. 18. 

The widow King Decemb. 28. 

Ann the wife of John Smyth buried Feb. 6. 

Grace Wittham daughter to John and Grace Wittham buried February 

'Birth. 

James son of Robert and Martha Boule borne July 22. 

John Mapole son to Anthony Mapole and Frances his wife borne Nov i 

Thomas son to William Death and his wife was borne Octob. 6. 

Joseph son to William and Ann Carpenter borne February 14, 1657. 

Sarah daughter to Robert and Ann Wade borne March 14. 

John son of Henry and Susan Garnar his wife borne Feb. 19th. 

'Birth 1658. 

William son of John and Ann Wright borne August 14. 

John son of John and Mary Godard borne July 14. 

John son of John and Jane Tottie borne Febr. 20th. 

Mary daughter of Henry and Mary Copinger borne November i, 1658. 

'Burialls 1658. 
ay 2"°. 



G of John Witham May. 

Mary the wife of William Wade May the 20th. 

Widow Lumbly June 10. 

Widow Wade Novemb. 27th. 

Anthony Mapole Novemb. 29. 

Widow Carpenter Decemb. 11. 

Brigitt the wife of Thomas Jacob Decemb. 22. 

Widow Smyth Octob. 20. 

Elisabeth Burges servant to Henry Copinger Esq. January i8th. 

Elisabeth wife of Thomas Smyth January 21. 

Margarctt ye wife of William Hues January 27. 



'Burialls 1659. 



Abraham Rudland May 10. 
Thomas Bixby July 27. 
William Hues August 14. 
Thomas Euersome January y" 2 
Adam Gutteredge February 14. 
William Pilbrow March 24. 



The Parish Registers 283 



•Birth 1659. 
Sarah Richard daughter to Robert and Ann his wife June 28. 
Mary Vice daughter to Thomas and Mary Vice Sept. 8. 
Mary daughter to Edmund and Mary Griggs Decemb. 18. 

'Birth 1660. 
Gregory son to William and Mary Copinger borne March 25, 1660 and babtised Aprill 

loth, 1660. 
Henry son to Henry Garneham and Elisabeth his wife babtised February i, 1660. 
Joseph son of John and Jeane Tottie babtised Feb. 3, 1660. 

Sarah daughter to Edmund and Martha Yardly his wife babtised Feb. 11, 1660. 
Ann daughter to William and Ann Carpenter babtised February 15, 1660. 

Marriages 166O. 
Richard Gotbald and Dorithie Coxsedge married Decemb. 20th, 1660. 

•Burialh 1660. 

Christnings 166I. 
Mary daughter to John Wade and Rachel his wife babtised April 15, 1 661. 
George son to John Goddard and Mary his wife babtised Aprill 15, 1 66 1. 
Laurance son to John Wright and Ann his wife babtised Aprill 21, 1661. 
Ann daughter to Philip Ramply and Margrett his wife babtised May i, 1661. 
John son to William Rush and Margrct his wife babt. May 24., 1661. 
Mary daughter to Richard Sheapheard and Elisabeth his wife babt. June 16, 1661. 
Ann daughter to Mr. Henry Copinger and Mary his wife babt. June 23, 1661. 
Ann daughter to Thomas Vice and Ann his wife bapt. August 11, 1661. 
Ann daughter to Mr. Robert More and Ann his wife babt. Decemb : 16, 1661. 
Richard son to John Witham and Elisabeth his wife babt. Decemb : 21, 1661. 
Elisabeth daughter to William Copinger clerk and Mary his wife babtised January 19th, 

1661. 
Caleb son to Robert Wade and Elisabeth his wife babtised February 7th, 1661. 
Ann daughter base borne to Mary Norfold babtised February 23, 1 66 1. 

Marriages 166I. 

Edward Eu[ersome] Decemb. 31, 1661. 

John Heyward and Margrct Rudland February 6th, 1661. 

BuriaLs 166I. 
Amy Pilbrow ye wife of George Pilbrow Aprill 2, 1 66 1. 
Mary Heyward Aprill 9th, 1661. 
Widow Elmer Octob. i8th, 1661. 
John Heyward March 6, 1661. 

Christ/lings for y' year l662. 
John son to George Sougate and Margrett his wife May 25, 1662. 
Hannah daughter to William Carpenter and Ann his wife babtised June i, 1662. 



284 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Mary daughter to James Durrant and Mary his wife June 24, 1662. , 

James son to James Durrant and Mary his wife babt. June 24, 1662. 

Sarah daughter to William Dean and Sarah his wife babt. June 25, 1662. 

Thomas son to Thomas Vice and Ann his wife August 24. 

Elisabeth daughter to Edward Waspe and Elisabeth his wife Octob. 18. 

Octob. 26. 

Edward Euersome and Martha his wife Decemb. 21. 

Thomas son to Thomas Jacob and Elisabeth his wife babtised March 22, 1662. 

Burialls for f year l662. 
Robert Salter Aprill loth. 
Henry Bennock Aprill 19th. 
George Sougate May 28th. 
William Wade June 12th. 
Peter Syer July 8. 
Widow Martyn August 18. 
The wife of Nathaniell Maulden Sept. 2. 

Thomas Blomfield the sonne of Thomas Blomfield gent November 15th. 
Mary daughter to William Rush and Margrett his wife Decern. 13. 
William OfFord January 24. 

Rachel y" wife of John Wade February 21, 1662. 
Amy Euersome March 14. 

A Register of y"^ Christnings Marriages and Burialls w'^" have been in the Parish of Buxhall in 

YE YEAR OF OUR LoRD GoD 1663. 

Richard Gierke buried Aprill 20th. 

John Wade buried Aprill 22. 

Richard son to John Witham and Elisabeth his wife buried Aprill 30. 

Joane widow of Abraham Rudland buried May 4th. 

John son to William Rush and Margret his wife buried May 10. 

Peter Martyn buried May 16. 

Mary daughter to George Pilbrow babtised May 26. 

Richard Martyn and Alie Coxsedge the daughter of Mr. John Coxsedge of Wetherden 

marryed June 30. 
James son to Robert King and Mary his wife babtised July 25. 
Nathaniell Maulden and Elisabeth Stafford marryed August 3. 

Henry son to William Copinger Rector of Buxall and Mary his wife baptised August 30. 
Stephen More and Elisabeth Mole married September 5th. 
Thomas Smyth buried October 6. 

Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Jacob jun. and Elisabeth his wife buried Novemb. 22. 
Ruth daughter to William Utteredge and Elisabeth his wife babtised December 5. 
Elisabeth and Ruth Utteredge wife and daughter to William Utteredge buried Decemb. 12. 
Mary daughter of John and Jane Tottie babtised January 10. 
Thomas son to Richard Ramply and Margret his wife babtised February 2. 
Mrs. Mary Copinger the widow of Mr. William Copinger buried March 6. 
There were this year Marriages 3, Christnings 6, Burialls 11, Robert Gooderick and John Goddard 
being church-wardens. 



The Parish Registers 285 

A Register of y'' Marriages Christnings Burialls w"^" have been in y' Parish of Buxall in y' 
YEAR OF OUR Lord God 1664. 

Dorithie daughter of Richard Shcapeard and Elisabeth his wife babtiscd March 25. 
Edward son of Edward Euersome and Martha his wife babtised March 29, 1664. 
William Mathew and Frances Grimwood married Aprill 12, 1664. 
Robert Halfepenny buried May 27, '64. 

Thomas son to Thomas Shave and Elisabeth his wife babtised July 2, '64. 
John Molham buried August 2, '64. 

Elisabeth daughter to William Mathew and Francis his wife babtiscd August 6. 
Mary Jacob and John Lydia married Octob. 8, 1664. 
Thomas son of Edmund Griggs and Mary his wife babtiscd Novemb. 17. 
Thomas Martyn and Susan Murton married November 26, 1664. 
Frances Mapole widow buried December 3, 1664. 

James son of Thomas Sougatc and Brigett his wife buried Decemb. 14. 
Robert son of William Death and Sarah his wife babtised December 26. 
Ann daughter of William Copinger and Mary his wife babtised January 3, 1664. 
Ann daughter of William Copinger and Mary his wife buried Janu : 6. 
Stephen son of Stephen More and Elisabeth his wife babtised January 12. 
Mary daughter of John Goddard and Mary his wife babtised Janv. 13. 
Ann Pilbrow widow buried Janv. 14. 

Martha daughter of Thomas Jacob and Elisabeth his wife babt. Janv. 15. 
Brigett daughter of Giles Hibble and Mary his wife babtised Janv. 24. 
Lewis Wood buried February 21. 

Elisabeth Heyward daughter of Frances Heyward widow buried March 23. 
There were this year marriages 3, christnings 10, Burialls 8, Robert Goodcrich and John Goddard 
being church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls w'" have been in ye Parish of Buxall 

IN THE YEAR OF OUR LoRD 1665. 

Ellen Motham widow buried March 27. 

George son of George Wade and Jane his wife babtised March 28, '65. 

George son of the widow Sougate buried May 31st. 

Dorithie daughter of Richard Sheapheard and Elisabeth his wife buried June I, 1665. 

John Tottie buried June 4th, 1665. 

John Bret of Shelland widower and Ann Bannock of Buxall widow married June 29, 1665. 

July 16, 1665. Robert son of William Death and Sarah his wife buried. 

July 25, 1665. Hannah daughter of Edward Waspe and Elisabeth his wife babtised. 

August 2, 1665. Mary and Ann daughters of Richard and Margrett Ramply buried both 

in one grave. 
August 14th, 1665. Charles son of Mr. Dudley North and Frances his wife buried. 
October 3, 1665. Richard Darcy and Mary Houlder married. 

November 7th, 1665. Richard son of John Witham and Elisabeth his wife babtised. 
John Hargard and Briget Sougate married November 16, 1665. 
December 7th, 1665. Edmund Welham widower of Bury St. Edmunds and Elisabeth 

Pilbrow singlewoman were married. 
and . . . .' of Buxall singlewoman were married, 

Decemb. 14, 1665. 



2 86 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Marian Euersome (who died at Hitcham) was buried here December 25, 1665. 
Robert Griggs was buried December 26th, 1665. 

Mary daughter of William Copinger and Mary his wife was babtised January nth, '65. 
John son of Edward Euersome and Mathew his wife was babtised February 2, '65. 
John son of John Hayward and Briget his wife babtised March 7th, 1665. 
Jeremiah son of William Carpenter and Ann his wife babtised March 13, 1665. 
There were in the year 1665 Marriages 5, Christenings 7, Burialls 10, Robert Gooderick and 
John Goddard being churchwardens. 

A Register of y'= Marriages Christnings and Burialls which have been in ye Parish of Buxall 
IN y" year of our Lord 1666. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob junior and Elisabeth his wife babtised Aprill 23, 1666. 

Henry Boule buried May 29, 1 666. 

Mathew daughter of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife babtised June 24, 1666. 

Isaac son of Richard Darcy and Mary his wife babtised July 17th, 1666. 

Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babtised August 12. 

Robert Edgarde of Coddenham in the County of SufF. widower and Dorithy Osborne 
of Buxall in j" county of Suff. singlewoman married August 14th, 1666. 

Elisabeth daughter base borne daughter of Margaret Sougate widow babtised August 17th, 
1666. 

Thomas son of Thomas Boule and wife babtised August 27, 1666. 

Rose Folcks buried October 6th, 1666. 

Thomas Alden of Coddenham in the countie of SufF. singleman and Susan Wade of 
Rougham in y" same countie singlewoman married Octob. 9th, '66. 

Thomas Grimwood of Buxall singleman and Margret Bennett of yc same parish single- 
woman were married Octob. 17th, '66. 

John son [base borne] of Elisabeth King widow babtised Octob. 23, '66. 

Nathaniell Bradstret of Buxall singleman and Mary Aldcrton widow of the same were 
married Novemb. 13th, 1666. 

John Maulden of Buxall singleman and Ann Gladdam of old Newton singlewoman 
married November 21, 1666. 

Elizabeth King widow buried November 29th, 1666. 

Mary Lannar buried Decemb. 25th, 1666. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob jun. and Elisabeth his wife buried March i ith, 1666. 
There were in this year 1666 Marriages 5 christnings 7 burialls 5, Robert Gooderick and John 
Goddard being church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls which have been in the Parish of Buxall 
IN y'^ year of our Lord 1667. 

March 28. William son of William Lilly and Ann his wife babtised. 
Mary daughter of John and Jane Tottic buried Aprill 1 6th, 1667. 
Susan y*^ wife of Edward Clerke buried Apr. 18. 
Henry Davy buried May 3rd, 1667. 

Thomas son of Stephen More and Elizabeth his wife babtised July 17th, '67. 
Robert Beamount singleman and Thamar More singlewoman were married August 20th, 
1667. 



The Parish Registers 287 

Ann Grimwood daughter of Thomas Grimwood and Margret his wife babtized Septem- 
ber 8th, 1667. 

October lo"', 1667. John Lannar widower and Elisabeth Bruester singlewoman (both of 
this parish) were married. 

Ann Maulden daughter of John and Ann his wife were babtised October 13, 1667. 

November 7'", 1667. Robert Rush of Mendlehame singleman and Margret Syer single- 
woman of y' same parish were married. 

Cisly daughter .... and Mary his wife .... burled December .... 

Sarah daughter of ... . Bradstreet and Mary his wife babtized Decemb. 14th, 1667. 

Elisabeth daughter of John Withara and Elisabeth his wife babtised Decemb. 13th, 1667. 

Daniell son of Thomas Jacob and Elisabeth his wife baptised Decemb. 14th, 1667. 

Elisabeth wife of Elias Scovill buried Decemb. 30th, 1667. 

Charles son of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife babtised February the 2, 1667. 

Alie Wood widow late wife of Lewis Wood buried February 25th, 1667. 

Martha Smyth widow buried March loth. 

Mary daughter of Richard Ramply and Margret his wife babtised March 23, 1667. 
There were in this year 1667 Marriages 4' Christnings 10 Burialls 7, Robert Gooderich and 
John Goddard being church-wardens. 

A Register of y'^ Marriages Christenings and Burialls which have been in y'^ Parish of Buxall 
IN y"^ year of our Lord 1668. 

Mary Parkfield buried April! 8, 1668. 

Charles son of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife buried April! 21, 1668. 

Elias Scovill Widower and Mary Wade singlewoman both of this parish were married 

May 19th, 1668. 
Jeremiah Kemball of Hitcham widower and Frances More of this Parish singlewoman 

were married May 21, '68. 
Elisabeth daughter of y' widow Sougate was buried May 22, 1668. 
singleman and parish singlewoman were married May 26, 

1668. 
William Syer buried June i8th, 1668. 
Benjamin Bret singleman and Martha Rudland singlewoman both of this parish were 

married June 25th, 1668. 
William Sparrow of Ofton singleman and Elisabeth Brabif of this parish widow were 

married June 29th, 1668. 
Deborah daughter of William Carpenter and Ann his wife babtised July 5th, 1668. 
Elias son of Thomas Scovil! and Susan his wife babtised Septerab. 13, '68. 
Mary daughter of Edward Waspe and Elisabeth his wife babtised September 18th, 1668. 
Edmund Ship singleman and Elisabeth Crow singlewoman both of this parish were married 

Sept. 21, '68. 
John son of William Lilly and Ann his wife babtised November 24, 1668. 
Thomas son of John Wright and Ann his wife babtised Janv. 29, '68. 
William son of Thomas Grimwood and Margrett his wife babtised February 5th, 1668. 
There were in this year 1668 Marriages 6 Christnings 6, and Burialls 4, John Heyward and 
William Micklefield being church-wardens. 



Should be 3. 



2 88 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

A Register of y'^ Marriages, Christnings and Burialls which have been in y^ Parish of Buxall 
IN y"^ year of our Lord 1669. 

Margaret the wife of Richard Ramply buried Aprill 10, 1669. 

James Houlder buried May 21, 1669. 

Edward Death of Hitcham singleman and Ann Kemball of the same singlcwoman were 
married May 27, 1669. 

Mary daughter of William Copinger and Mary his wife buried June 16, 1669. 

Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Jacob ju. and Elisabeth his wife baptised Sept. 9th, 1669. 

Abraham Jacob buried Sept. 21, 1669. 

John Lannar buried Sept. 22, '69. 

Nathaniell Maulden buried Sept. 28, '69. 

Richard Ramply widowe and Mary Norfold both of this parish were married October 1 2, 
1669. 

John Heyward buried Octob. 22, 1669. 

Esther Jarsraan widow buried Octob. 27, '69. 

Elisabeth daughter of Nathaniell Bradstreet and Mary his wife babtised January 11, 1669. 

James son of Richard Darcy and Mary his wife babtised February 2, 1669. 

John son of Richard Sheepheard and Elisabeth his wife babtised Febru. 6, '69. 

Anthony Smyth buried February 19, 1669. 

Elisabeth daughter of John Goddard and Mary his wife babtised March 3rd, '69. 
There were in this year 1669 Marriages two Christnings five Burialls eight' Anthony Smyth and 
John Heyward being church-wardens till they died. 

A Register of y"^ Marriages Christnings and Burialls w'-" have been in y''- Parish of Buxall in 
y"^ year of our Lord 1670. 
George son of Elias Scovyll and Mary his wife babtised May y'= 23, 1670. 
John son of Edmund Ship and Elisabeth his wife babt. May 29. 
John son [base borne] of Elisabeth King widow buried June 19th. 
Henry son of Richard Ramply and Mary his wife babtised July 27, 1670. 
Francis son of Robert Cobball and .... his wife babtised Septemb. 4, 1670. 
Robert son of Robert Beamont and Thamar his wife babtised Septemb: 18, 1670. 
Sarah daughter of Nathaniell Bradstreet and Mary his wife buried Sept : 24., 1670. 
Benjamin son of Benjamin Bret and Martha his wife babtised October 2, 1670. 
Henry Birby of Thorpe Morieux Widower and Bridgctt Houlden of Buxall singlewoman 

were married October 20th, 1670. 
James Thomson .... and Mary Boule .... singlewoman were married 

Octob : 25, 1670. 
William son of John Heyward and Bridgett his wife was babtised Novenib. 6th, 1670. 
Henry son of Richard Ramply and Mary his wife buried Decemb. 12th. 
Susan Reade widow of Fincborrow Magna buried Decemb. 13th. 
Mary daughter of Thomas Grimwood and Margrett his wife was babtised 'December 15th, 

1670. 
Edward son of John Wright and Ann his wife babtised December 23, 1670. 
John son of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife babts : June 2. 
Edward Clerk buried Janv. 31. 
Mary Ramply buried Janv. 31. 

' Should be q. 



The Parish Registers 289 

Susan daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babtised February z, 1670. 

Edmund son of Edmund Griggs and Mary his wife babtised Feb. 3, 1670. 

Martha daughter of Edward Waspe and Elisabeth his wife babtised Febru. 17th, 1670. 

all singlcman .... gcr of the same parish .... were married 
March 4, 1670. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife buried March 12, 1670. 
Thomas sonne of Peter Smyth and Hannah his wife babtised March 12, '70. 
There were in this year 1670 Marriages three Christnings fourteen Burialls seven. Thomas 
Pilbrow and Thomas Grimwood being Church Wardens. 

x\ Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls wch have been in ye Parish of Buxall 

IN YE YEAR OF OUR LoRD 1 67 1. 

John son of Thomas Jacob junior and Elisabeth his wife babtised Aprill 3rd, 1671. 

Susan daughter [base borne] of Ann Grimwood babtised Aprill 5th, 1671. 

Ann the wife of Robert Davy buried June 2, 1671. 

Henry son of William Copinger Parson of Buxall and Mary his wife buried Septemb. 

igth, 1671. 
John Girtten singleman and Elisabeth Pennell singlewoman both of this parish were 

married September 30th, 1671. 
Robert Goodrich buried Octob. 2, '71. 
Ambrose Sougate and Elisabeth Salter both single persons of this parish were married 

Octob. 5, 1671. 
Jeremiah son of Jeremiah Scovill and Hannah his wife babtised October 13, 167 1. 
Robert son of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife buried Novemb. 20th, 1 67 1. 
Susan Jacob buried Decemb. 23, '71. 
The widow Smyth buried Decemb. the 15 th. 
Elias Scovill buried March 15th, 1671. 
There were in this year 1671 marriages two Christnings three Burialls eight,' Thomas Pilbrow 
and Robt. Richer being church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls w"^" have been in ye Parish of Buxall 

IN YE YEAR OF OUR LoRD 1672. 

Thomas son of Ambrouse Sougate and Elisabeth his wife babt : June i6, 1672. 

John Colchester of Rinxall in the Countie of Suffolcke singleman and Judcth Death of 

Hitcham in ye same countie singlewoman were married June 27. 
George Pilbrow buried July 7th, 1672. 

Thomas son of Ambrouse Sougate and Elisabeth his wife buried July 13th, '72. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife buried July 14th, 1672. 
Sarah daughter of Nathaniel Bradstreet and Mary his wife babtised August 27, 1672. 
Thomas son of Thomas Sougate and Mary his wife babtised September 13, 1672. 
Edmund Offord widower of this Parish and Dorothy Gooddall singlewoman of the same 

were married October 3, 1672. 
Elisabeth and Ann twinn-daughters of John Girtten and Elisabeth his wife were babtised 

Octob. 29, 1672. 
Ann one of the aforesaid daughters of John Girtten and Elisabeth his wife was buried 

Novemb. 5 th. ^^ 

' Should be 7. 
38 



290 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Thomas son of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babtised November 6th, 1672. 
Elisabeth the other twinn-daughter of John Girttcn and Elisabeth his wife was buried 

Novemb. 8th, 1672. 
John son of Benjamin Bret and Martha his wife babtised November loth, 1672. 
Martha wife of Benjamin Bret buried Novemb. nth, 1672. 

Penelope daughter of William Mathew and Frances his wife babtised November 29th, 1672. 
Susan daughter of Ann Grimwood buried Decemb. 25, 1672. 

Edmund son of Edmund Ship and Elisabeth his wife babtised January loth, 1672. 
Thomas S .... and Margaret .... 
Mary and Ann two twinn-daughters of Thomas Jacob junior and Elisabeth his wife 

babtised March 20th 1672. 
Jeremiah son of William Carpenter and Ann his wife buried March 21, 1672. 
There were in this year 1672 Marriages two Christnings eleven Burialls nyne ' Robt. Richer 
and Thomas Pilbrowe beinge Churchwardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls w'" have been in the yeare of o" Lord 

ONE thousand six HUNDRED SEAVENTY THREE. 



John son of John Maulden and Ann his wife babtised May 26, 1673. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob ju : and Elisabeth his wife buried May 31, 1673. 

.4nn daughter of Mary Norfold buried June 6th, 1673. 

Elisabeth daughter of Ambrose Sougate and Elisabeth his wife babtised June 7th, 1673. 

Robert Richer was buried Septemb. 26, 1673. 

Susan daughter of Anthony Le Straing and Margrct his wife babtised October 27th, 1673. 

buried November. 

Thomas son of John Hayward and Brigget his wife babt. November 2, 1673. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Grimwood and Margaret his wife babtised November 5, 1673. 
Thomasine daughter of William Mathew and Frances his wife babtised Novemb. nth, 1673. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Grimwood and Margaret his wife buried Novemb. 19th, 

1673. 
Elisabeth daughter of Edmund OfFord and Dorothy his wife babtised Novemb : 23, 1673. 
Thomas King of this parish singleman and Sarah Death of Lavenham singlcwoman were 

married Novemb : 27. 
Robert son of John Multiyward Gent, and Martha his wife buried Decemb : I, 1673. 
Elisabeth daughter of John Girtten and Elisabeth his wife babtised January 24th, 1673. 
William Rush buried Febru : 19th. 
Ann Davy buried Febru : 23, 1673. 

Thomasine daughter of William Mathew and Frances his wife buried March 4th, 1673. 
There was in this year 1673 one marriage there were eight christnings and nine Burialls Robt. 
Richer and Thomas Pilbrow being Church-wardens. 

A Register of ye Marriages Christnings and Burialls w*^" have been in y^ year of our Lord 

ONE thousand six HUNDRED SEVENTY FOUR. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob ju. and Elisabeth his wife christned June Sth, 1674. 
Elisabeth daughter of Robert Beamont and Thamar his wife babtised June 21, 1674. 
Mary daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babt. November 5th. 



The Parish Registers 291 

George Baker buried Novemb. i6, 1674. 

Thomas son of Edward Eversome and Mathew his wife babtised Novemb. 22th, 1674. 
Amy Houlder widow buried December 3, 1674. 
Ann the wife of John Brett buried Decemb : 27th, 1674. 

Ursula daughter of Thomas King and Sarah his wife babtised January gth, 1674. 
Sarah daughter of Thomas Grimwood and Margaret his wife babtised January 24th, 1674. 
• Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob ju. and Elisabeth his wife buried March 9th, '74. 
Mrs. Judeth Copinger buried March 20, 1674. 
There, were this year 1674 six christnings and five Burialls Robert Richer and Thomas Pilbrow 
being Church wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls which have been in ye year of our Lord 

ONE thousand six HUNDRED AND SEVENTY FIVE. 

John son of John Maltyward Gent and Martha his wife babtised Aprill 6th, 1675. 

John Bret buried June 15th, '75. 

Isack son of Thomas Jacob ju. and of Elisabeth his wife babtised July 25, 1675. 

August 5'", '75. Ursula daughter of Thomas King and Sarah his wife buried. 

John Witham singleman and Elisabeth Martyn singlewoman both of this parish were 

married September 22, 1675. 
Francis Parr and Ann Deadman both single persons and of this parish were married 

September 22, 1675. 
Edmund Levor and Judeth Coc both single persons and of this Parish were married 

October 19, 1675. 
Henry Copinger Esq"^ buried December 6th, 1675. 
January 11"', 1675 the widow Waller was buried. 

Elisabeth daughter of John Witham and Elisabeth his wife was babtised February 5th, 167;. 
There were in this year marriages four ' Christnings three Burialls three ^ Anthony Le Straing 
and Thomas Vice being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls which have been in y" year of our Lord 

ONE thousand six HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SIX. 

John Goodwin of Ratlesden singleman and Sarah Loss of this Parish singlewoman were 

married Aprill 2, 1676. 
Thomas Martyn buried Apr. 5th. 

Susan daughter of Ambrose Sougate and Elisabeth his wife was babtised Aprill 14, 1676. 
Thomas son of Thomas King and of Sarah his wife babtised Aprill 22, '76. 
Francis son of Anthony Le Straing and Margaret his wife babt. May 5th, 1676. 
Ambrose Sougate buried May 7th, 1676. 
Thomas Badcock of Ringshall singleman and Elisabeth Stearne singlewoman of this parish 

were married May 23, 1676. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas King and Sarah his wife buried July 21, '76. 
Edmund sonne of Edmund Lever and Judeth his wife batised August 25, 1676. 

John Martha his wife babtised Septemb. I, 1676. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Sougate and Mary his wife babtised September 3, 1676. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babtised Septemb. 3, 1676. 

' Should be 3. = Should be 4. 



292 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Hannah daughter of William Mathew and Frances his wife was babtised Septemb. 29, 1676. 

Benjamin sonne of Edmund Jacob and Ann his wife babtised October 14, 1676. 

Thomas son of Thomas Chaplyn and Elisabeth his wife babtised Octob. 27th, 1676. 

Joane Grimwood widow buried October 29, 1676. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob ju. and Elisabeth his wife babtised Novemb. 11, 1676. 

A Stranger buried Decemb. 4. 

Henry Alexander singleraan and Susan Goodrich singlewoman both of this parish were 

married Decemb. 29, 1676. 
James sonne of Edmund OfFord and Dorithy his wife babtised Janv. i, '76. 
Richard sonne of Richard Darcie and Mary his wife babtised February 2, 1676. 
There were in this year marriages three Christnings thirteen Burialls five Richard Darcy and 
Thomas Chaplyn being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages, Christnings and Burialls w"^" have been in y"^ year of our Lord 
1600 seventy seven in y"^ Parish of Buxall. 

John Sonne of Thomas Grimwood and Margaret his wife babtised March 25, 1677. 

Hannah daughter of Robert Penning and Margaret his wife babtised Aprill 3, 1677. 

Mary daughter of John Cocksedge and Naomi his wife babtised Aprill 17, 1677. 

James Eastcrson of Fineborrow Magna singleman and Ann Syer of this parish singlewoman 
were married May 15th, 1677. 

Ann daughter of George Tompson and Ann his wife babtised June 9th, 1677. 

Thomas sonne of Thomas King and Sarah his wife babt : June 13. 

Susan daughter of John Pilbrow and Jane his wife babtised July 28, '77. 

Susan wife of Henry Osburn buried July 28, 1677. 

Thomas son of John Maulden and Ann his wife babtised August 5th, '77. 

Thomas sonne of Thomas King and Sarah his wife buried August 31, 1677. 

Ann daughter of Thomas Jannyns of Haughly and Elisabeth his wife babtised Septem- 
ber 2, 1677. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Jacob ju. and Elisabeth his wife buried Octob. 3, 1677. 

Elisabeth daughter of Ambrose Sougate [deceased] and of Elisabeth his relict buried 
Octob : 10, 1677. 

Frances daughter of Henry Alexander and Susan his wife babtised October 15th, 1677. 

John sonne of Edmund Lever and Judeth his wife babtised Octob. 29, '77. 

Peter sonne of Peter Jacob babtised December 30, '77. 

Daniel sonne of John Darrant and Ann his wife babtised January 2, 1677. 

Thomas Pilbrow buried January loth, 1677. 

Mary daughter of John Hayward and Bridgget his wife babtised January 27, 1677. 

Elisabeth daughter of Francis Parr and Ann hiswife babtised January 29, 1677. 

Daniel sonne of John Durrant and Ann his wife buried February i, 1677. 

Thomas Sougate buried February 28, 1677. 

Miles Bumstead buried Febru. 28, 1677. 
There were in the year 1677 Marriages one, Christnings fourteen Burialls eight Richard Darcy 
and Thomas Chaplyn being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls which have been in the Parish of 

Buxall in the year of our Lord 1600 seventy eight. 

Sarah daughter of Thomas Jacob junior and Elisabeth his wife babtised Aprill 3, 1678. 



The Parish Registers 293 

Henry Bannock of this parish singleman and Susan Clarke of the same singlewoman were 

married May 2, 1678. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife buried July 15th, 1678. 
Ann the wife of Edmund Jacob buried the 26th day of Septemb., '78. 
Mary daughter of Robert Thurgood and Susan his wife babtised October 2, 1678. 
William Webb buried October 9th, 1678. 

William . . . . es his wife babtised Octob. i6th, 1678. 

Abigail the relict of Nathaniell Mauldcn buried October 22, 1678. 

John Ramplyn of this parish singleman and Catherine ScarfF of the same singlewoman 

were married Octob. 29, 1678. 
Robert Beaumont buried October 30, 1678. 

Mary daughter of Robert Chappel and Ann his wife babtised Decemb. 16, '78. 
Peter Jacob junior buried Janv. I, 1678. 
William Martyn of Hitcham widower and Elisabeth Jourdaine of this parish singlewoman 

were married Janvary 14, 1678. 
Sarah daughter of Thomas King and Sarah his wife babtised Janv. 19, '78. 
Robert Burlyn of Onehouse widower and Thamar Carpenter of this parish singlewoman 

were married Janv. 23, 1678. 
Elisabeth the wife of Richard Shepherd buried Janvary 31, 167S. 
Edmund sonne of John Girtten and Elisabeth his wife babtised March 9th, 1678. 
Edmund Griggs yeoman buried March 19th, 1678. 
There were this year Marriages 4 Christnings 6 Burialls 8, Edmond Griggs and Robert Pen- 
ninge being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls w'-" have been in the Parish of Buxall 
IN y'^ year of our Lord 1679. 

Ann daughter of Thomas Chaplyn and Elisabeth his wife babtised Aprill 5th, '79. 
Thomas Smyth buried Aprill loth, 1679. 

Isack Sonne of Thomas Jacob junior and Elisabeth his wife babtised May 2, 1679. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Covill (sic) and Susan his wife was babtised May 16, 1679. 
Ralph Keling of St Clements parish in London Gent and Mrs. Elisabeth Copinger of 

this parish were married May 25, 1679. 
Isack sonne of Thomas Jacob ju. and Elisabeth his wife was buried June 4th, 1679. 
Robert Goodrich was buried July 5th, '79. 

Elisabeth daughter of Francis Parr and Ann his wife was buried July 15th, 1679. 
Leonard sonne of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babti. July 22, 1679. 
Henry sonne of Henry Bannock and Susan his wife babtised August 10, '79. 
Catherine wife of John Ramplyn buried August 22, 1679. 

Mary daughter of Joseph Woods and Mary his wife babtised August 30th, 1679. 
John son of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife buried Sept. I, '79. 
Robert sonne of Edmunde Lever and Judeth his wife babtised Septem. 5th, 1679. 
John Sonne of John Ramplyn and Catherine his wife babtised Septem. 5th, 1679. 
Margaret Pilbrow widow buried Sept. 15th, 1679. 
Mary wife of Thomas Sougate buried Septem. 19th, '79. 
Susan daughter of Elisabeth Sougate widow buried Septemb. 23, '79. 
Henry sonne of Henry Bannock and Susan his wife buried Sept. 29, '79. 
Susan wife of Henry Bannock buried October I, 1679. 



2 94 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

George Cocksedge yeoman buried October yth, 1679. 

Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Grimwood and Margaret his wife babtised Octob. i6th, 1679. 
Robert Davy widower buried Novemb. 17th, 1679. 

Richard Sonne of Richard Ramplyn and Elisabeth his wife babtised Janvary 7th, 1679. 
Robert Sonne of Wm. Mathew &c. babt. Janv. 10th, '79. 

George sonne of George Tompson and Ann his wife babtised Janvary 23, 1679. 
Richard son of Richard Ramplyn and Elisab. his wife buried Janvary 23, 1679. 
Benjamin sonne of John Pilbrow and Jane his wife babtised Febrv. 6th, 1679. 
Judcth Coe wife of John Coe buried Febrvary 13, 1679. 
Elisabeth Boule widow buried Febrvary 21, 1679. 

Mary daughter of John Witham and Elisabeth his wife babtised March 1 3, '79. 
George sonne of George Tompson and Ann his wife buried March 18, 1679. 
There were this year Marriages I Christnings 14, Burialls 19' Joseph Woode and Robert Pen- 
ninge being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages, Christnings and Burialls which have been in the Parish of 

BUXALL in the year OF OUR LoRD 1680. 

Susan daughter of John Pilbrow and Jane his wife buried Aprill 6th, 1680. 

Mary daughter of Francis Parr and Ann his wife babtised Aprill 26, '80. 

John Jacob singleman and Mary Brinckly singlewoman both of this Parish were married 
May 13th, '80. 

John Chaplyn singleman and Mary Jourdaine singlewoman of Finebarrow Magna were 
married May 15th, 1680. 

Henry Osburn buried May 19th, 1680. 

Widow Hayward the Relict of John Hayward Butcher buried May 28th, 1680. 

Edward Eversome junior buried May 31, 1680. 

John Ramplyn widower of this Parish and Elisabeth Stanton of this Parish single- 
woman were married June 8th, 1680. 

Susan the wife of Edmund Denny of Combes was buried July 13th, 1680. 

Elisabeth the wife of Peter Jacob was buried Septemb. 7th, 1680. 

John sonne of Edmund Jacob and Thomasinc his wife was babtised September the loth, 
1680. 

William Mickelficld was buried Septemb. 20, 1680. 

Jacob ju Octob. 26 buried. 

Henry Da ... . widower buried October 27, 1680. 

Elisabeth wife ot John Girtten buried Decemb. 7th, 1680. 

Mary daughter of Edmund Offord and Dorethy his wife babtised December 29th, 1680. 

Symon Warner of Stowmarkett widower and Mary Gills of this parish singlewoman were 
married Janvary 23, 1680. 

John Deadman buried Febvary 7th, 1680. 

Elisabeth daughter of John Cocksedge and Naomi his wife babtised March i, 1680. 

Nicholas Hall buried March 13th, 1680. 

John sonne of Richard Ramplyn and Elisabeth his wife babtised March 17th, 1680. 

Margarett the wife of Thomas Buries of Debdcn in the County of Suff. Gent, buried 
March l8'th, 1680. 

John Sonne of Richard Ramplyn and Elisabeth his wife buried March iSth, 1680. 



Should be 



The Parish Registers 295 

Elisabeth wife of Ricliard Ramplyn buried March 21, 1680. 
There have been this year Marriages 4 Christnings 6 ' Burialls fifteen William Mathew and 
Edmund Lever being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriges Christnings and Burialls w"^" have been in the Parish of Buxall 
IN the year of our Lord 1681. 

Ellen daughter of John Ramplyn and Elisabeth his wife was babtised this 26 day of 

March, 1681. 
Bridgett the wife of John Hayward was buried the thirtieth day of March 1681. 
John Pearle of Ratlesden widower and Mary Cocksedge of this parish singlewoman were 

married Aprill nth, 1681. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas Boule and Sarah his wife were babtised Aprill 13th, '81. 
Edmund Witham of this Parish singlcman and Mary Richer singlewoman of ye same 

married Aprill 19th, 1681. 
Mary daughter of Richard Darcy and Mary his wife babtised May 3, 1 681. 
Sarah daughter of Francis Parr and Ann his wife was babtised May 6th, 168 1. 
James Durrant of Bretenham singleman and Elisabeth Death of Hitcham singlewoman 

were married June l6th, 1681. 
John Sonne of Edmund Jacob and Thomasine his wife buried June 20th, 1681. 
Benjamin sonne of John Maulden and Ann his wife babtised June 30th, 168 1. 
John Sonne of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife babtised July 3, 1 681. 
John Sonne of Daniell Southgate and Susan his wife was babtised July 19th, '81. 
Robert sonne of Robert Richar and Mary his wife was babtised September I, 1681. 
Judeth daughter of Edmund Lever and Judeth his wife babtised October 6th, 1681. 
Robert sonne of Robert Chappel and Ann his wife babtised Octob : 9th, 1 68 1. 
Ann the wife of Thomas Jacob was buried October loth, 168 1. 
Richard Ramplyn widower of this parish and Ann Kemball singlewoman of the same were 

married October 25th, 1 68 1. 
Francis daughter of William Mathew and Frances his wife was babtised Decemb : 2, 1681. 
William sonne of Jeremiah Scurvill and Hannah his wife babtised December 23, 1681. 
Dorithy daughter of Joseph Woods and Mary his wife babtised Jan vary 7 th, 1 681. 
Edmund sonne of John Griggs and Hannah his wife was babtised Janvary 14., 168 1. 
Sarah daughter of Thomas Jacob ju : and Elisabeth his wife babt. Jan v. 15. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Sou[gate and Mary] his wife babtised Janv. 15th, '81. 
Sarah daughter of Thomas Jacob ju : and Elisabeth his wife buried Janv. 28, '81. 
Margaret Sowgate widow was buried Febrvary 8th, 1 68 1. 

Robert Sonne of Robert Chappel and Ann his wife was buried Febrvary 12th, 1681. 
There were this year 1 581 Marriages 4, Christnings 16, Burialls 6, Joseph Wood and Edmund 
Lever being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls W-" have been in y'' Parish of Buxhall 
IN the year of our Lord 1682. 

Bridgett Sougate widow was buried Aprill 13, 1682. 

John sonne of John Witham and Elisabeth his wife babtised Aprill 15th, 1682. 
John Hayward widower and Elisabeth Syer singlewoman both of this parish were married 
Aprill 25, 1682. 

" Should be 5. 



296 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Mary daughter of Edmund Witham and Mary his wife babtised May 5th, l'682. 

John sone of Charles Cross and Sarah his wife babtised May 18th, 1682. 

. . . . Thomas Grimwood and Margaret his wife babtised Janv. 6th, 1682. 

John Stanton of Hitcham singleman aud Mary Everet widow were married June 8th, i6S^. 

Edmund sonne of John Griggs and Hannah his wife was buried June 26th, 1682. 

Mary daughter of Francis Parr and Ann his wife was buried July 5th, 1682. 

Samuel sonne of Samuel Bateman and Mary his wife babtised August 21, 1682. 

John Ormesby buried August 22. 

Margarett the wife of Richard Scott of Fineborrow Magna buried Sept. 7th, '82. 

Abigal daughter of John Goddard and Abigal his wife babtised Septemb : 28, 1682. 

John Sougate and Ann Paine both single and both of this Parish were marryed Octob : 

15th, i68z. 
Thomas sonne of Robert Penning and Margarett his wife was babtised October 

16th, 1682. 
John Hay ward buried November 9th, 1682. 

Elisabeth daughter of Thomas King and Sarah his wife babtised Decemb. 22, 1682. 
Winifreid daughter of Edward Boggas and Ann his wife babtised December 22, 1682. 
Ann daughter of Thomas Vice and Ann his wife was buried December 26, 1682. 
Caleb Wade of this Parish singleman and Elisabeth Bacon of West Creton sing : woman 

were married Janv. 14, 1682. 
Susan daughter of Thomas Scovill and Susan his wife was buried Janv. 19th, 1682. 
Richard Stafford was buried Janvary 31, 1682. 

Abigal daughter of Joseph Wood and Mary his wife was babtised February 2, 1682. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas King and Sarah his wife buried February 12th, 1682. 
Susan daughter of Daniel Sougate and Susan his wife was babtised Feb. 13, 1682. 
Edmund sonne of John Griggs and Hannah his wife was babtised March the 3, 1682. 
Hannah daughter of Thos. Jacob jun. and Eliz. his wife was baptized Mar. y' i6th, 1682. 
Elisabeth the wife of Tho. Jacob ju. was buried March 18th, 1682. 
John Goddard buried March 20, '82. 
There were this year 1682 Marriages 4 Christnings seven,' Burialls 17,^ Henry Copinger Gent. 
and John Maltyward Gent, being Church-wardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls w^" have been in the Parish of Buxhall 
IN the year 1683. 

Edmund sonne of Edmund OfFord and Dorithy his wife babtised March 25, 1683. 

Richard sonne of Margarett Palmer base-borne babtised Aprill 8th, 1683. 

Mary daughter of Richard Spincke and Elisabeth his wife was babtised Aprill 16. 

Hannah base borne daughter of Hannah Mole of Ratlesden baptised y' 22nd of 
Aprill, 1683— Memorandum this child was brought from little ffinborrow where it 
was at nurse to be christened here there being noe minister there at that time. 

Benjamin sonne of John Maulden and Ann his wife was buried May 3, 1683. 

Elisabeth daughter of John Ramplyn and Elisabeth his wife was babtised May 1 6th, 1683. 

Judeth daughter of Edmund Lever and Judeth his wife buried June 2, 1683. 

Thomas Vice buried June 2, 1683. 

Anthony L'Strange was buried June 9th, 1683. 

Ann daughter of John Sougate and Ann his wife babtised July 14th, 1683. 



Should be 13. ' Should be 12. 



> The Parish Registers 297 

Syer widow (formerly the wife of William Syer deseased) was buried y' i8th day of 

July, 1683 
Susan daughter of Robert Thurgood and Susan his wife babtised August 4, 1683. 
Thomas S . . . . Susan Thurgood .... 

Mary daughter of [Thomas] Pilborow and Rachael his wife babtised August 19th. 
Naomi daughter of John Cocksedge and Naomi his wife was babtised September 

10th, 1683. 
Thomas Pilbrow of Rougham singleman and Sarah Paman of this parish singlewoman 

were married October 2, 1683. 
Robert Thurgood of this parish widower and Jane Balles of the same singlewoman were 

married October 7th, 1683. 
Thomas Baker of Wetherdon singleman and Mary Colbourne of the same Parish single- 
woman were married October llth, 1683. 
Robert Diaper of this Parish widower and Elisabeth Gibbons of Old-Ncwton widow were 

married Octob : 27, '83. 
Thomas Chaplyn was buried Octob : 28. 
Bridget Salter buried Novem. 4. 

Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Poole and Elisabeth his wife babtised Novemb. 19th, 1683. 
Hannah daughter of Edmund Witham and Mary his wife was babtised Janvary 26, 1683. 
Mary daughter of Edmund Jacob and Thomasine his wife was babtised March 2, 1683. 
Elisabeth Chaplyn and Thomas Chaplyn lately deceased) was babtised 

March 11, 1683. 
Samuel sonne of Thomas Sougate and Ann xx his wife was babtised March 23, 1683. 
John Sonne of John Goddard and Abigail his wife was babtised March 24, 1683. 
There were this year 1683 Marriages 4, Christnings 15, Burialls 7, Henry Copinger Gent, and 
John Maltyward Gent, being Churchwardens. 

A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Burialls w"" have been in the Parish of Buxhall 
IN the year 1684. 

Symon sonne of Thomas Jacob and Sarah his wife was babtised May 20. 

Sarah daughter of John Witham and Elisabeth his wife babtised May 27th, 1684. 

John sonne of Francis Parr and Ann his wife was babtised May 28. 

Thomas sonne of Caleb Wade and Elisabeth his wife babtised June 15th, '84. 

Elisabeth wife of John Witham buried June 27th, 1684. 

Ann daughter of John Girttcn and his wife babtised July 13, 1684. 

Ann daughter of John Girtten and his wife buried July 1 8th, '84. 

Sarah daughter of John Witham and Elisabeth his wife buried August 13, 1684. 

Margaret Hayward widow buried August 25, '84. 

William Sougate and Margaret Rudland were married Septemb : 23, 1684. 

William Smyth and Ann Groom were married Septemb: 28, 1684. 

Thomas Penninge of this Parish singleman and Susan Cocksedge of the same parish 

singlewoman were married October 5th, 1684. 
George Mordcn singleman was buried October i6th, 1684. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Pilbrow and Rachel his wife buried Octob. 26th, 1684. 
John sonne of John Witham was buried October 29th, 1684. 
William Mathews buried Decemb : 17th, 1684. 
Elisabeth daughter of Thomas Pilborow and Rachael his wife was babtised December 

25th, 1684. 

i9 



298 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Henry son of Richard Spinkc and Elisabeth his wife was babtised Decemb : 26, '84.. 
Hannah daughter of William Mathews late deceased and ffrances his Relict was buried 

Jan. 7th, 168+. 
Thomas son ot Robert Richer and Mary his wife baptised 22 Decemb: 1684. 
John son of Richard Darcy and Mary his wife, babtised February the secod, 1684. 
Thomas Jacob and Mary Maninge were married February 12, 1684. 
ffebruary 25. Edward Kilbourne and ffrances Coleman were married. 
March 4th, 1684. Mr. William Copinger Rector of this Parish was buried. 
The widow Looper was buried on Trinity Sunday, 1685. 
Mary daughter of Joseph Woods was buried i6th March, 1685. 
Naomi the wife of John Cockscdge was buryed 17th March, 1685. 
. . . . the daughter of John Ramplyn was buried March 17th, 1685. 

Christnings. 
Judeth daughter of Edm'' Levir was baptised 9 August, 1685. 

A Register of y'' Marriages Christnings and Burialls w'" have been in the Parish of Buxhall 

IN THE YEAR 1 686. 

Edward Wasp was buryed ffeb''' 2nd, 1686. 

Hannah daughter of John Griggs was baptised 1686. 

Ann daughter of Thomas Sowghate was baptised July 3rd, 1686. 

Isaac Matthews was buryed 2 Aug: 1686. 

Thomas Adgar and Ann Bright were married Jan', 1686. 

March 18, 1686. Simon son of Symon Bradstreet was baptised. 

Richard Ramplin and Mary Stanton were marryed Jan", 1686. 

for y' year 1687. 

Edmund .... buryed May 8th, 1687. 

Mary Witham Wid. buryed July 19, 1687. 

John Lawrence and Hannah Carpenter were marryed July 24th, 1687. 

Edm'' Turner and Elizabeth Copinger were marryed 26 July, 1687. 

John Barnes and Mary Tillot were married 6th Octob', 1687. 

Ann Vice was buryed 26 Novemb. 1687. 

William son of W'" Shire of Clare was baptised Decemb' 23, 1687. 

John son of John Soughate and Ann his wife was baptised 2 fFeb'', 1687. 

John son of John Poole was baptised I3lh fFeb"', 1687. 

Margaret daughter of Wm. Copinger and Margaret his wife was baptised 26 fFeb"', 1687. 

Priscilla daughter of Wm. Choate was baptised 3 March, 1687. 

Jeremiah Squirrill was buried Apr. 2nd, 1687. 

A Register of the Burialls Christnings and Marriages in this Parish of Buxhall in y' 

YEARE 1688. 

Henry Allexandcr was buried 3rd of Jan'>', 16S8. 

Tho. Poole was buryed 1688. 

Mary daughter of Thomas Pilborrow was baptised ffeb"' 24th, 1688. 

Sarah daughter of Thomas Sughate and of Ann his wife was Baptiz'd 31 of May, 1688. 

John son of Tho. Sughate and of Ann his wife was Baptizd y' loth of May, 1690. 



The Parish Registers 2gg 



William son of Thomas Soughatc and of Ann his wife was Baptiz'd on or about y" 3rd of 

Aprill, 1692. 
Abraham son of Thomas Sughate and of Ann his wife was Baptizd y' 25 of 

January, 1694.. 
Y' 4th day of March, 1696. Joh son of John Parker was baptised. 
Thomas so of Tho. Fuller was baptised about y' 5th of May, 1696. 
John son of Edward Boggas was baptised about Easterday. 
Anna daughter of John Jacob was baptized June the — 1696. 
Sarah j' wife of John Jacob was baptised June — 1696. 

BuriM, 1696. 
The Wid. L'Strange, Aug. 1696. 
Ralph Johnson's child. 

Winifred daughter of Mr. Chenery of HaughJey. 
John and Peter sons of Thomas Pelbarrovv and Elizabeth his wife were baptized 

II Octob', 1696. 
Crackerode son of Mr. William Copinger Rector ib'm and of Margret his wife was born 

y" iith of Octob' 1696 and was baptised y'" 20th Octob' 1696 Sam Crackerode 

Walter Clopton Godfathers Mrs. Isabella North Godmother. 
August 14th, 1695. 

Elisabeth daughter of William Copinger born 29 of June, 1695. 
Tho. Simonds of St. Edm'" Bury Widower and Hananah Waldingfield of the same town 

were married about the middle of the month of August, 1695. 
Ann daughter of Jeremiah Sheppard was born and Baptised y' 26th day ot Septemb', 

1695. 
Robert son of John Hayward was born and baptised y" 26th day of Septemb', 1695. 
Ann daughter of Jeremiah Sheppard was buryed Octob' y' — , 1695. 
Richard son of John Ramplin was baptised 28th of Octob' 1695 and was born six weeks 

before St. Michaell last past. 
Susan daught' of Elias Scofield was baptised y'' 3" of November. 
Thomas Barrow of Bcyton singleraan and Rachcll Hibble of this Parish singleworaan were 

marryed the 17 of No : 1695. 
The wife of Wm. Carpenter was burryed the 25th of Novemb', 1695. 
Sarah the daughter of Sam' OfFord was baptised the 26th of Novemb', 1695. 
Mary Daughter of Edw" Major and Mary his wife was baptised i695- 't was 

born vpon y"" 4th of November, 1695. 
John Grimwood was buryed March y' 6th, 1695. 
John son of Thomas Parker was baptised y° 5th of Apr', 1696. 
Elizabeth daughter of John Goddard was baptised the first of May, 1696. 
Mary daughter of John Griggs was baptised May ye 10, 1696. 
John son of John Poole and Ann his wife was baptised fFeb" 18, 1686. 
Mary daughter of Joseph Woods and Mary his wife was buried i6th March, 1685. 
Naomi wife of John Cocksedge buried 17 March, 1685. 
Easter daughter of Jo Woods and Mary his wife was baptised Jan-, 1585. 
The daughter of John Ramplyn buried 16 March, 1685. 
Edward Wasp was buried fFeb'>' 2, 1686. 
Widow Cooper died on Trinity Sunday, 1685. 
Judeth daughter of Edmund Levir bap. 9 Aug., 1685. 



) History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Hannah daughter of John Griggs and Hannah his wife was baptised on the Saturday- 
preceding Trinity Sunday, 1686. 
Isaac Mathews was buried 2nd August, 1686. 
July 3'', 1686. Ann daughter of Tho. Sougate was baptised. 
March 13, 1686. Simon s. of Simon Bradstreet was baptised. 
Caleb Wodes child about that time. 
John Girt and Rose Diaper were married 27 Novemb., 1687. 

Tho. Adgar and Ann Bright 1 • , 1 > j r i i^\>h 

„. , , ° , , ,, ^ ■ maried about the end of Jan. 1680 

Richard Ramplyn and Mary Stanton J 

The Relict of Edmund Witham buried 19th July, 1687. 

John Laurence and Hannah Carpenter maryed July 24, 1687; 

Edmund Turner and Elisabeth Copinger mar: July 26, 1687. 

John Barnes and Mary Tillot 6th Octob', 1687. 

An Vice buryed 26 Novemb', 1687. 

Hen. AUexander was buried the third day of Jan-, 1688. 

Tho. Pool was buried. 

Mary D. of Tho. Pilbarrow baptised fFeb"' 24, 1688. 

Sarah daughter of Henry Copinger Esq'^ was born the last day of August and Baptizec 

the eight day of September in the year one thousand six hundred eighty nine. 

^ Me Wm. Copinger Rector. 

[End of Register 2.] 

ICCOUNT OF THE NaMES AND QUALITIES OF THE PERSONS WHO HAVE BEEN BuRYED IN WoOLLEK 

IN THE Parish of Buxhall in the year 1694. 
Elizabeth Chaplain Affidavit was certifyed by Mr. Walter 

Widow was buryed 24 Noyemb', 1694. Clopton Rector of Ratlesden 30th No. 1694. 

Mary Wade Widow was buryed Affidavit certifyed by Mr. Clopton 28th of fFeb. 

2 1 St ffeb., 1694. 1694- 

Elisabeth Harrison Widow was buryed Affidavit certifyed by Mr. Walter Clopton 

8th March, 1694. L5th March, 1694. 

Wm. Copinger Rector ib'm. 



Allowed by us 

The marke of - Churchwardens. 



^/'" " . ■* ' Stephen Keble ^ 

H Huntingtower „, ^.^ ,. [ 



]. Barker. i u I 

Tho : Jacob J 

Buxhall Suff. The Names and Qualities of the Persons who have been Buryed in ye Parish 

of Buxhall in the year 1695. 

Martha the wife of John Barns was buryed Apr. 22. Affidavit of her being buryed 

ye 19th of April, 1695. in WoUen was certifyed by Mr. Walter Clopton. 

4th May. Tho. Jacob Butcher was buryed. Affidavit of his being buryed in Woollen 

was certified y' 7th of May by Mr. Weld. 
30th May, 1695. Wm. Choate was buryed. Affidavit of his being buryed in Woollen 

was certifyed y' 4th of June, 1695, by Mr. 
• Walter Clopton. 
Thomas King was buryed the 7th Affidavit certified by Mr. John Daynes 

of July, 1695." Rector ot Washbrooke 13th of Julij, 1696. 

' Note. — As all the other entries in this book appear also in the subsequent Register, this 



The Parish Registers 30: 



A Register of the Marriages Christnings and Buryalls which have been in the Parish ( 

BuXALL IN THE YEAR OF OUR LoRD 1695. 

Christiiirigs. 
Elisabeth daughter of Wm: Copinger Rector ib'm and of Margrctt his wife was baptised 

y' 29 June, 1695. 

Ann daughter of Jeremiah Shepheard and his wife was baptised 26 Septemb', 1695. 

Robert son of John Hayward and Ann his wife was baptised y' 26 Sept., 1695. 

Richard son of John Ramplyn and his wife was baptised about y^ 20th of July, 

1695. 
Susan daughter of Elias Scofield and Ann his wife was baptised y" 3rd of Nov'"'', 1695. 
Sarah y' daughter of Samuell Offord and Elisabeth his wife was baptised ye — of 

Novemb', 1695. 
Mary daughter of Edw'' M[ajor] and Mary his wife was baptised y" 4th of Novemb'', 1695 

Marriges. 
Thomas Symonds of Bury St. Edm''* and Ann of Waldingfield of the same were marryed 

August, 1695. 
Thomas Burrow of Beyton singleraan and Rachaell Hebbell of this Parish were marryed 

y' 17 th of Novemb', 1695. 

Buryalls. 

Ann daughter of Jeremiah Shephard was buryed in Octob^, 1695. 

[Ann y" '] the wife of William Carpenter was buryed y" 25th of Novemb', 1695. 

John Griggs was Buryed y" 6th of March, 1695.^ 

1696. 

John son of Thomas Parker was baptised ye 5th of April, 1696. 

Elisabeth daughter of John Goddard was baptised y= ist of May, 1696. 

Mary daughter of John Griggs and Hannah his wife was baptised y° 10 May, 1696. 

Thomas the son of Thom' fuller and his wife was baptised 5 May, 1696. 

John son of Edward Boggas and his wife was Baptised vpon Easter day 1696. 



Register of persons buried in Woollen is not continued. The Register itself proceeds to the year 
1731. The Register was kept pursuant to the Act of 30 Car. II. cap. 3 (1679), entituled "An Act 
for Burying in .Wollen," and was intended " for the lessening the importation of linen from beyond 
the seas, and the encouragements of the woollen and paper manufactures of this kingdom." An 
affidavit was to be brought within eight days of the burial under a penalty of j^3 that the deceased 
was not buried in linen. By section 4 of this Act it was enacted that all persons in Holy Orders, 
Deans, • Parsons, Deacons, Vicars, Curates, and their, or any of their substitutes, should within their 
respective parishes, precincts, and places, take an exact account, and keep a Register of every 
person or persons buried in his or their respective parishes or precincts, or in such common burial- 
places as their respective parishioners are usual buried. But no penalty was to be incurred by reason 
of any person dying of the plague, although such persons should not be buried according to the Act. 

' Particulars supplied from the Woollen Register. 

^ In the Register of Persons buried in Woollen the name is given as John Grimwood. 



302 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

Hannah daughter of John Jacob was baptised in June, 1696. 
Sarah wife of John Jacob was baptised y^ — of June, 1696. 
John and Peter twin sons of Thomas Pilborrow and Elisabeth his wife were baptised y' 

nth Octob', 1696. 

Stephen son of Wm. Ranson and his wife was baptised y° i8th Octob' : 1696. 

Cracicerode son of William Copinger Rector of this Parish and of Margrett his wife was 

Baptised y' 25th Octob: 1696. 
Ann daughter of George Goddard was baptised y" 25 of Octob', 1696. 
Ann daughter of Jeremiah Sheppard and of his wife was baptised y'' loth of 

Novemb'', 1696. 
Mary y' daughter of John Brett and his wife was baptised vpon y" 28th of October, 

1696. 

Marryagei. 
Robert Green and Penelope Mathews were marryed in October, 1696. 
Edmund Levir and Mary Pearle of the Parish of Ratlesden both single maryed in 

Octob', 1696. 
John Lockwood and Martha Colson of Stowmarkett both single marryed y' 15th Octob', 

1696. 

BuyyM in 1696. 
Ruth Jacob was buryed y'' 2nd of July, 1696.' 
John Clarke was buryed y'^ 8th of July, 1696 [yeoman]. 
Elisabeth L'Strange was buryed y' nth of August, 1696 [widow].= 
Winnifrid Chenery was buryed y' 3rd Septemb', 1696 [daughter of Tho. Chcnery of 

Haughly]. 
Richard Ramplyn was Buryed y' 2nd of January, 1696. 
John son of Thomas Pilborrow was buryed y" 4th of Jan''', 1696. 
There were in this yeare 1696 Baptisms 13 Marriages 3 Buryalls 6, Thomas Smith and Edwara 
Griggs being Church-wardens. 

Wm. Copinger 

Rector ib'm. 
1697. 
Ckmtnings. 
Elisabeth daughter of John Chaplin and Bridgett his wife was Baptised y" 29 of March, 

1697; 
Margarett daughter of Henry Whistle and of Margarctt his wife was baptised y' nth 

day of April, 1697. 
William son of William Shave and of Elisabeth his wife was baptised y= 6ih day of May, 

1697. 
James son of Thomas Sughate and of Ann his wife was baptised y° loth day of May, 
■697. 

' In Woollen Register the entries are — 

June. Ruth daughter of Sarah Jacob widow. 

July 2. Sarah the wife of John Jacob was buryed. 
= Supplied from Woollen register. In this register appears — September, 1696. The son of 
Ralph Johnson unbaptiz'd was buried in woollen. 



The Parish Registers 303 



Margret daughter of William Lambert and of Margrett his wife was baptised -f — of 

May, 1697. 
Mary daughter of Joseph Godfrey and of Elisabeth his wife was baptised y" ist day of 

June, 1697. 
Elisabeth daughter of Edmund Blake and of Elisabeth his wife was baptised y"' 23 of 

June, 1697. 

Maniiiges. 

[John Leaver and Mary Raulin raarry'd October y' 17th, 1709. 
John Hayward and Sarah Badcock marry'd Nov. y° 23, 1709.'] 

Burialh. 
John Boggas was buryed y' y' 26th of March, 1697. 
Alice Johnston was buryed y' y' 13th of April, 1697. 
William son of William Shave was buryed in May, 1697. 
John Brett was buryed y' 2nd of July, 1697. 
John Stern and Elisabeth Offord were marryed 1697. 

Matrages. 
John Stanford and Elisabeth Green both single marryed y' nth of April, 1697. 
George Ellet and Ursula Roper of Gypping marryed f 3rd day of May, 1697. 
Jo son of Joseph Tottie was baptised. 

son of John Hayward was baptised. 

Novemb' i6th, 1697. Elisabeth Ranson was buryed [wife of Wm. Ranson^]. 

Robert y° son of John Parker and his wife was baptised y' 21 of Novemb^ 1697. 

Leonard Mannings was buryed the 29th day of November, 1697. 

John Sughate widower and Susan Camplin singlewoman were married the 2nd day of 

Decemb', 1697. 
William Lambert of Nawton singleman and Ann Mauldin of this Parish were married 

the 5th day of Decemb', 1697. 
Robert son of John Parker was buryed y' 7 Decemb', 1697. 

Elias son of Elias Scofield and Ann his wife was baptis'd y= 2d day of January, 1697. 
Mary daughter of Robert Rought and Dorithy his wife was baptized 2d day of January, 
1697. 

22 Jan^, 1697. 
Mary Thorowgood was buryed. 

Sarah daughter of John Griggs and Hannah his wife was baptiz'd y" 12 day of ffeb"', 1697. 
Elisabeth daughter of John Sterne and Elisabeth his wife was baptiz'd ye 13th of fteb"', 

1697. 
Ann daughter of Wm. Copiuger and Margrett his wife was baptiz'd the 14th of ffeb'", 

1697. 
William son of William Shaue and Elisabeth his wife was baptised 1697 Born y" 24th of 
ffebruary, 1697. 

1698. 
Robert Deadraan of Ratlcsden singlem" and Elisabeth Harrison of Brctcnham singlewom" 
were marryed y' 4th day of April, 1698. 



In different handwriting. 

Particulars in brackets supplied from Register uf persons buried 



304 History of the Parish of Buxhall 

John Hinds of Kettlebaston singlem" and Susan Brook of Bretenham singlewoman were 

marryed y" 4th day of April, 1698. 
Hannah daughter of John Ramplin and Elizabeth his wife was Baptised y' loth of April, 

1698 Was born y' 27th of March. 
Stephen son of William Ranson was burycd y' loth of July, 1698. 

Mary daughter of Edward Boggas and Ann his wife was baptized y' 16 of July, 1698. 
John Witham and Elisabeth Walter were marryed y' 21 of June, 1698. 
Daniel son of John Goddard and Elizabeth his wife was baptised y' 19th of Septemb', 

1698. 
Elizabeth the daughter of William Brook and Elizb'" his wife was born and baptised y' 

24th of Octob', 1698. 
Daniel son of John Chaplin and Bridget his wife was born y' 28 Novemb. and was 

babptized y' 4th of Decemb'', 1698. 
Mary Ralph of Needham Market was buryed about y' 9th of Novemb', 1698 [Widow]. 
Sarah daughter of John Sughate and Susan his wife was born y° 22 of Octob' and was 

babtized y*" 6th of Novemb', 1698. 
Sarah daughter of John Griggs was buryed ye — Decemb', 1698. 
John son of Thomas ffuller and Priscilla his wife was baptiz'd j" 24 Decemb', 1698. 
Stephen son of Wm. Ranson and Mary his wife was baptized 6 Jan"^, 1698. 
Sarah Osborn was baptized ye 11 of June, 1699. 
Daughter of John Stern baptized. 

Mary Keble was was buryed Feb. 4th, 1698 [The wife of Stephen Keble •]. 
Mary Salter was buryed y' 5th of Feb''', 1698. 
John Makyward Gent, was buryed y' 14th of February, 1698. 
Elizabeth daughter of John Chaplin and Bridget his wife was buryed the 2 2d day of 

April, 1699. 
Wm: Rush of the Parish of Onehouse was buryed y' 24th day of April, 1699. 
Margret Armsby widow was buryed j' 29th day of April, 1699. 
Martha daughter of William Gibson of Onehouse and of Martha his wife was born y" 

30th of April and Baptized y« ist of May 1699 and was buryed the eight day ot 

May, 1699. 
fFrancis Soughate was buryed j' 24th of May, 1699. 

Mary daughter of Wm. Lambert and Marg.' his wife was born y" 2d of June and bap- 
tized y' 16 of the same month, 1699. 
Hugh Girten was buryed Maij, 1699. 
Sarah daughter of Thomas Pilborrow and Elizabeth his wife was born y' 20th and was 

baptised y" 25th of June, 1699. 
Edmund son of Edmund Blake and Eliz"' his wife was born ye 29th May, 1699, and 

baptised y° 1 8th of June, 1699. 
Thomas y' 3d son of Wm. Copinger and Margrctt his wife was born y= 22d of July and 

was baptised y" 3d day of August, 1699. 
Edmund son of Edm" Blake was buryed y*^ 2 2d day of August, 1699. 
Henry Smith was buryed [September i '] . 

Sam Offord's child born about y' Lady 1700 Baptised in July following named Joseph. 
16 of Octob', 1699. Stephen Ranson of this Parish singlcman and Ann Studd of this 

Parish singlewoman were marryed. 



Particulars in brackets supplied from Register of persons buried in Woolle 



The Parish Registers 305 



Margaret King widow of the Parish of great ffinborrow was buryed. 

Mary daughter ot" Elias Scofield and Ann his wife was baptised lOth Novemb. 1699. 

Ann daughter of John HeywarJ and of Ann his wife was baptiz'd the loth of Decemb", 

1699. 
Ann daughter of Robert Rought and of Ann his wife was baptiz'd the 10th of Decemb'', 

1699. 
John fFuIler was buryed January y' 15th, 1699. 
Mary Copinger was buryed y" 23d of January, 1699. 
Ann Rought was buryed y" 13th of ffcbruary, 1699. 
Thomas son of Thomas Biles und Deborah his wife was baptized y° 2d day of March, 

1699. 



It had been intended to give an account of the eminent natives of Buxhall, 
but as this would mainly be a repetition of what has already appeared on the subject 
in the writer's " History of the Copinger Family," 1884 (H. Sotheran & Co.), this 
has been omitted, and the parish history brought to a close with its Registers. 

" Now sleep, the beauteous landscape fades 

Beneath the waning morn ; 
And I forsake these lovely glades 

To seek my home alone ; 
Still, still the scene shows fair and bright — 

Thou village of my heart ! good night ! " 



40 



APPENDIX 

TRANSCRIPT OF A COURT ROLL, APRIL 24, 3 EDW. VL 

Buxhall. Curia Generalis ibidem tenta die Mercurii xxiiij'" die Aprilis Anno Regni Regis Edwardi 

Sexti tcrcio. 

Essoniatores Edwardus Salter per Willielmum Bradstrett Thomas Lawman per eundem Cristina 
Crosse per Thoraam Crosse Elizabeth Cage vidua per Ricardum Catton Robertas Crosse 
per Johannem Taylor Johannes Crosse et Thomas Roger per Thomam Talmage Isa- 
bella Hill per Andream Ellys Georgius Benytt per Robertum Colman Ricardus Crowe 
per Henricum Richardes de communi. 

Capitales Willielmus Bradstrett \ Andreas Salter ] 

cum homagio Johannes Taylor • Juratores Robertus Osborne 

Willielmus Berte ) Robertus Makyn 

Johannes Woode \ Johannes Glanvyle 

Andreas Ellys I Juratores Henricus Richardes 

Georgius Salter ) Henricus Murton 

Johannes Salter dc Badwell, Jurator. 

Communis finis Capitales predicti presentant quod dare debent domino ad hunc diem de comuni 
ijs. fine ut in capite ct inde in plena Curia satistecerunt domino dc iiijs pro duobus 

annis. 

Secta Curie Capitales cum homagio presentant super eorum sacramentum quod tenentes manerii de 

in misericordia Lefey heredes Johannis Spryng militis Thomas Tymperley armiger Johannes Jower 
Thomas Smyth " bayly " Robertus Smyth Robertus Bradstrett Johanna Salter Relicta 
Ricardi Salter Agnes Kyng tenentes terrarum nuper Hcnrici Smyth senioris debent 
sectam Curie ad hunc diem et fecerunt detaltam ideo quilibet eorum in misericordia 
iijd. 
fines xxs. Ad banc Curiam venit Johannes Glamvyle et ostendit Copiam tactam ad Curiam hie 

tcntam die Mercurii in Festo Sancti Jeronimi anno regni regis Henrici vij, xvj per 
quam patet quod ipse cepit ex concessione domini unum tenementum vocatum 
"Brownys" jacens in Buxhall nuper Petrij Nele prout in Rotulis Curie predicte 
plenius patet quequidam Isabella obiit per diversos annos jam elaupsos Et predictus 
Johannes presens in Curia sursumreddidit in manum domini preJictum Tenementum 
cum pertinenciis ad opus et usum Willielmi Childe et heredum suorum sub condicione 
sequente videlicet si predictus Willielmus heredes executorcs vcl assignati solvant aut 



3o8 Appendix 



solvi faciant prefato Johanni Glamvyle executoribus vel assignatis suis xj li legalis 
monetc Anglie in tbrma sequentc videlicet ad fcstum Pasche proximum post titulum 
hujus Curie xxs. et sic de anno in annum durante termino decern annorum extunc 
proximo et immediate sequente ad predictum festum Pasche quolibet anno xxs. legalis 
monete Anglie quousque dicta summa xj'' fuerint plene soluta et satisfacta Et ulterius 
sub conditione quod predictus Johannes durante vita sua quiete et in pace hebebit (.r/V) unam 
Cameram in occidentali parte tenementi predicti una cum libero introitu et exitu in 
eodera Ac eciam quod idem Johannes similiter bene et in pace capere potest ad usum 
suum proprium medictatem fructus crescentis in orto et pomario premissis pertinentibus 
Et ulterius quod idem Johannes omne tempore se califaciat ad ignem ipsius Willielmi 
vel assignatorum suorum infra tenementum predictum factum ad terrainum vite dicti 
Johannis Glamvyle alioquin sursumredditio predicta sit ad opus et usum predicti 
Johannis iGlam\7le et heredum suorum et in defectu premissorum ex parte dicti Wil- 
lielmi perimplendorum bene licebit prefato Johanni licencia Curie optenta in premissa 
reintrare et sibi retineri imperpetuum presente sursumredditione non obstante. Et 
predictus Willielmus Chylde presens in Curia petit admitti inde tenentem Cui liberata 
est inde seisina tenendum sibi heredibus et assignatis suis de domino per virgam ad 
voluntatem domini secundum consuetudinem manerii sub condicione predicta salvo Jure 
fidelitas et dat de fine et fecit fidelitatem et facit sectam Curie et alia servicia inde debita &c 

reddendo inde domino per annum iiij'. 

Ad hanc Curiam venit Margareta Salter Relicta Johannis Salter "bocher" in plena 
Curia presenti Johanni {sk) filio dicti Johannis dcfuncti et cognovit tenerc de domino 
ad terminum vite sue remanere inde prefato Johanni filio et heredibus suis unum 
tenementum vocatum " Rysbys " cum Crofto adjacente continente per estimacionem 
ij acras jacentes in Buxhall juxta tcrram Edwardi Salter vocatam "Tylars" ex 
oriente et viam ducentem versus " Fenne strett " ex occidente cum tribus acris terre 
j acra prati et dimidia, j acra pasture eidem pertinentibus per servicium unius clavi 
Gariofili per annum et sectam Curie et fecit inde fidelitatem. Cognovit eciam tenere 
libere unum Croftum sive pictellum vocatum " Paynys " jacens ad finem borialem Crofti 
tenementi predicti et inde rcddat per annum IXd. de rcdditu nuncupato "Willisons 
fidelitas rent " et predicta Margareta fecit inde similiter fidelitatem &c. 

fines Ixiiij' Ad hanc Curiam presentatum est per homagium quod Agnes Cator alias Smyth relicta 

Thome Cator alias Smyth post ultimam Curiam extra Curiam secundum consuetudinem 
manerii In consideracione vj'' xiij' iiij" sibi per Henricum Copynger armigerum dominum 
manerii predicti fideliter persolvendorum modo et forma prout continetur in Indor- 
samento cujusdam scripti obligatorii gerentis datam xxiiij'" die Aprilis anno regni regis 
Edwardi Sexti tercio per quodquidem scriptum idem Henricus obligatur eidem Agneti 
in majore summa pro securitate solucionis dicte summe vj'' xiij* iiij'' predicta Agnes sur- 
sumreddidit remisit relaxavit et quietum clamavit dicto Henrico domino manerii et 
heredibus suis similiter per manus Henrici Richardes et Henrici Murton nativorum 
tenendum in prescncia diversorum fide dignorum hoc testantium viij acras terre plus 
vel minus vocatas " le Buxhalle marshe " que nuper conjunctim cepit cum Thoma 
Smyth nuper viro suo et Johanne filio suo et heredibus suis ut in anno nono Henrici 
viij patet. Ita quod nee ipsa nee heredes sui decetero aliquid juris tituli seu demaundi 
de et in premissis exigere clamare seu vendere poterint in futurum &c. 
Et dominus sic seisitus in ista plena Curia consit extra manus suas Thome Langerwoode 
et heredibus suis predictas viij acras tenendas sibi heredibus et assignatis suis de 
domino per virgam ad voluntatem domini secundum consuetudinem manerii Sub con- 



Appendix 



309 



prcccptum 
distringere 



satistaccio 
redditus 



dicione quod predictus Thomas heredes executores ct assignati sui infra vij annos jam 
proximo futures construant et edificiunt super predictas viij acras tcrre unum domum 
mancionem competentcra alioquin bene licebit domino et heredibus suis in predictas 
viij acras terre reintrare et eas in manibus suis reseisire present: concessione non obstante 
Cui videlicet prefato Thome liberata est inde seisina tenendum sibi heredibus et assig- 
natis suis sub condicione et forma predicta reddendo inde per annum xiiij^ et facit 
sectam Curie ct alia servicia et fecit fidelitatem &c. 

Item prescntant quod Henricus Smyth alias Bayly tam liber tenens quam nativus obiit 
post ultimam Curiam seisitus de et in omnibus illis terris nativis quas tenuit de hoc 
manerio tempore mortis sui sed quantum inde ignorant et dicunt quod Johannes 
Smyth quo ad terras predictas nativas filius dicti Henrici est inde heres propinquior 
ct est etatis quinquc annorum et nuUus venit &c idco preceptum est ballivo seisire 
premissa in manum domini et inde domino respondere de exitibus quousque &c. 
Et ulterius dicunt quod idem Henricus tenuit de manerio libere certas terras per ser- 
vicium redditus per annum vj'' nee non alias terras per servicium redditus per annum 
vocati "Willisons Rente" ij'' ob. sed certitudinem tenementi prcdicti ad presens ignorant 
ncc utrum obiit seisitus idco prcccptum est ballivo distringere tenentes dictarum ter- 
rarum quod sint ad proximam Curiam hie tcncndam ad ostendendum quomodo ingressi 
sunt feodum domini &c. 

Ad hanc Curiam venit Alicia Gawgys vidua et in plena Curia sursumreddidit in manum 
domini unum clausum terre jacens juxta "bedwell" continens per estimacionem x 
acras cum seperali via eidem clauso pertinente sive sit plus vel minus cum pertinenciis 
nee non unum mesuagium cum Gardino adjacente prout Includitur nuper Willielmi 
Basker prope ecclesiam cum suis pertinenciis que omnia premissa cum suis pertinenciis 
eadem Alicia cepit conjunctim cum Roberto Gawges nuper viro suo et Johanne filio 
suo jam defunctis ex eoncessione domini ut patet ad Curiam hie tentam die Jovis 
proxima post festum Sancti Leonardi anno regni regis Henrici viij, xix ad opus et 
usum Henrici Richardes et heredum suorum qui presens in Curia petit admitti inde 
tenens Cui liberata est inde seisina, tenendum sibi heredibus et assignatis suis de 
domino per virgam ad voluntatem domini secundum consuetudinem manerii et dat de 
fine ct fecit fidelitatem &c reddendo per annum viij*. 

Ad hanc Curiam venit Johannes Lacy et satisfecit domino de xx'' pro arreragiis unius 
annualis redditus iiij'' in aretro existentis per quinquc annos exeuntis de tribus acris 
terre parcelle cujusdem Campi vocati " le Melle Felde " et inde dominus eum 
it &c. 



Nunc de Le 



Juratores 
deccnne 



defectus secte 
decenne 



Ad hunc diem veniunt Willielmus Bert Junior, Ricardus Cage, Robertus Colman, 
Ricardus Gawges, Willielmus Richardes, Johannes Moore, Johannes Knok, Andreas 
Knok, Thomas Bert, Edmundus Fraunces, Ricardus Catton, Thomas Crosse, Thomas 
Reve, Johannes Jacob, Johannes Richard, Walterus Moore, Edwardus Smyth et Hen- 
ricus Richardes et Jurati sunt in decenna domini Regis 

Item dicunt quod Robertus Leche, Johannes Stirpe, Johannes Lambe, Robertus Moore, 
Georgius Baker, Robertus Smyth, Christoferus Barrard, Thomas Salter, Johannes Crosse 
et Walterus Kyske sunt decenarii comorantes infra procinctum hujus lese ultra unum 
annum et unum diem et ad hunc diem fecerunt defaltam secte Curie ideo quilibet 
eorum in misericordia iij*" 



3IO Appendix 



pena Item dicuiu quod Robertas Smyth ct Thomas Crosse custodientes equas pascentes in 

iiiisericordia comunibus strati's ct viis hujus villc contra statutum ct ordinacionem inde cditas ad 

nocumentum ct perturbacionem diversorum vicinorum, ideo ipsi in miscricordia uterque 

iij'' preceptumque est eisdem ne sic amplius faciant sub pena uterque xij'' 
pena forisfac- Dicunt eciam quod Ricardus Spynk forisfccit penam super ipsum positam in ultima 
tura vj'' Curia quia non escuravit fossetum apud " Coksall medowe " prout habuit in mandato 

preceptumque est eidem escurare et mundare sufficienter citra festum natalis domini 

proximura sub pena vj" 
pena posita Preceptum est villate de Buxhall escurare fossatum apud " Gardyners brydge " citra 

festum Sancti Michaelis Archangeli proximum sub pena vj° viij'' 
pena Preceptum Roberto Colman escurare fossatum in "Brodbroke Strett " in longitudine 

juxta terram domini in lirma sua ex austro dicti vici citra idem festum Sub pena iiij" 
pena Preceptum Elizabethe Cage escurare fossatum apud "mans barne " ex boriali dicti vici 

juxta terram suam citra proximam Curiam Sub pena xij" 
pena Preceptum Henrico Richardes escurare fossatum in longitudine iiij particarum juxta 

"Mellc fclde" ex oposito tenementi vocati "barons" citra proximam Curiam Sub 

pena vj'' 
pena Item dicunt quod Willielmus Kyske permisit tenementum suum nativum fore Ruinosum 

in omnibus necessariis ideo ipse est in miscricordia preceptumque est eidem sufficienter 

reperare dictum tenementum citra proximam Curiam sub pena xij'' 
pena Preceptum este villate de Buxhall sufficienter facere metas suas citra festum Penticostes 

proximum Sub pena x" 

Affirmatum per capitalcs cum homagio. 



TRANSLATION OF A COURT ROLL 5 AND 6 PHILIP AND MARY. 

I. Court with Icet there held in the Feast of St. Jerome the Priest in the fifth and sixth 

years of the reigns of Philip and Mary by God's grace of England, Spain, France, 
both the Sicilies, Jerusalem and Ireland, King and Queen, Defenders of the 
Faith, &c. 

issoins. John Richar essioncd by Henry Richar, Andrew Salter by John Salter, William 
Bradstrete by Robert Martyn, Robert Bradstrete by Robert Eevclos, Robert More 
and Thomas More his son essoined by John Osborne, Michael Talmage by Thomas 
Laman, Thomas Smyth by Richard Collen, Edward Hubbard by Robert Sevelos, 
John Woode by William Syer, William Goodriche by John Cooke. 

Plaint. Richard Elis complains against Robert Osborne of a plea of detention of one cow, 
pledges to prosecute : John Doo, Richard Roo. 



(William Syer "j Thomas Laman ^ William Berte 

Henry Richar \ sworn William Kysse - sworn Henry Murton 

Richard Collen j Richard Richar J Robert Waren 



nj 



Appendix 



31 



Who say upon their oath that Hciiry Murtoii out of court surrendered into the 
lord's hand by the hand of George Salter, bond tenant, in the presence of Robert 
Smythe and Robert Crosse, likewise bond tenants, twelve acres of bond land called 
"bertes" lying in Bu.xhall, which lately were of John Tynton, which the aforesaid 
Henry Murton late had at the same time and in common with William Murton and 
Fine xxiiijs. J°^" ^^^ ^^''''^ ^J '^^ surrender of Henry Murton as appears in the court held here 
on Thursday on the morrow of St. Jerome in the 15th year of the reign of King 
Henry the eighth, to the behoof of James Crosse and his heirs to whom seizin 
thereof is delivered. To hold to him his heirs and assigns by the rod at the will 
of the lord according to the custom of the manor and by a rent of ics. by the year 
and suit of court, saving the right &c And he gives for fine &c and did fealty to 
the lord &c. 



Who say upon their oath that Robert Crosse, bond tenant, died since the last court 
and before his death surrendered into the lord's hand by the hand of Henry Murton, 
bond tenant, in the presence of John Crosse of Sudbury likewise bond tenant, 
xiiij acres of meadow and pasture land lying in Buxhall between the lands of the 
manor of Buxhall and the lands of the Vicar of Fynbarow called Malingdowne on 
the one side, and lands late of the said Robert Crosse on the other side, one head- 
land abutting upon lands of the manor of Fynbarrow Halle called " Lowfyldc " and 
another headland abutting upon the Street called Gardeners strete, to the behoof of 
his testament or last will, by which he willed and declared that James Crosse his 
brother should have all and singular the premises to him his heirs and assigns, which 
Fine LVjs. . all and singular the premises with the appurtenances the aforesaid Robert Crosse 
lately had by the surrender of John Crosse his father as in the first year of King 
Edward the sixth appears. And hereupon the aforesaid Henry Murton into whose 
hands the aforesaid surrender was made and present in Court surrendered into the 
lord's hand the aforesaid xiiij acres of meadow and pasture land with the appur- 
tenances to the behoof abovesaid. And now comes the aforesaid James Crosse and 
prays to be admitted to the aforesaid xiiij acres of meadow and pasture land with the 
appurtenances, to whom seizin is thereof delivered. To hold to him his heirs and 
assigns by the rod at the will of the lord according to the custom of the Manor 
&c saving the right &c and by the rent of iiijs by the year and suit of court Sec 
And he gives to the lord of fine &c And he did fealty to the lord &c. 



And that Robert Crosse bond tenant died since the last Court and before his death 
surrendered into the lord's hand by the hand of Henry Murton bond tenant, in the 
presence of John Crosse of Sudburi, likewise bond tenant, one tenement newly built 
and ten acres of meadow and pasture land called " buxhall mershe " lying in 
Buxhall between lands of the manor of Buxhall on one side and lands called 
"benalles" in part and lands of William Goodridge on the other side, one headland 
abutting upon lands of the said manor of Buxhall and another headland abutting 
upon "Gardeners strete" which the aforesaid Robert Crosse lately had by the sur- 
render of Thomas Langerwode as in the third and fourth years of the lord and lady 
Philip and Mary the now King and Oueen it doth appear, to the behoof of his 
testament or last will, by which he willed and declared that James Crosse his brother 
should have all and singular the premises to him and his heirs and assigns. And 
hereupon the beforesaid Henry Murton into whose hand the aforesaid surrender was 



Appendix 



made and present in Court surrendered into the lord's hand the aforesaid newly built 
tenement and ten acres of meadow and pasture land with the appurtenances to the 
behoof abovesaid. And now comes the beforesaid James Crosse and prays to be 
admitted to the aforesaid newlv built tenement and the aforesaid ten acres of meadow 
and pasture land with the appurtenances, to whom seizin is thereof delivered. To 
hold to him his heirs and assigns by the rod at the will of the lord according to 
the custom of the Manor by the service of xiiijs rent by the year. And suit of 
Court Saving the right &c And he gives to the lord of fine &c. And he did fealty 
to the lord Sec. 



And that Robert Smythe bond tenant of this Manor died since the last Court and 
before his death surrendered into the lord's hand by the hand of Robert Waren bond 
tenant in the presence of Robert Rydnall likewise bond tenant all his lands held of 
this Manor to the behoof of Edward his son and his heirs. 



f It is commanded to distrain Richard Sare so that he may be at the next Court 
to do fealty -, to do fealty or other service to the lord for certain free tenements, called White 
I erthes, of this manor by the service of ijd by the year &c. 



mercy iijd. 



r And that William Kysse permits his bond tenement to be exceedingly ruinous and 
I in decay by default of "le Thackinge" Therefore &c and it is commanded to him 
1 to well and sufficiently repair the tenement aforesaid in all things before the feast 
I of the Nativity of St. John Baptist under the pen 



IJS. 



And that Richard Sare entered into the wood of the lord called Buxhall Woode and 
there cut down and carried away certain " le broche woude " and certain "le fagot 
bendes " out of the wood aforesaid. Therefore in mercy as in the head. And 
he is commanded not to do so any more under the penalty of vs. 



I" And that Agnes Kingc of 

I jointly with Anna Kinge daughi 



retenham widow died since the last court and held 
of the said Agnes certain bond tenements held 
of this manor And the aforesaid Anna Kinge came not Sec. 



And that Robert Reches esquire, William Springe esquire, Thomas Tympcrley 

mercy xviijd. 4 esquire, Robert Rydnall, Roger Salter, the vill of Fynbarrow because they owe suit 
to this court and have made default Thereof each of them in mercy as appears 
^ upon their heads. 



Office of C And that they have elected Robert Waren into the office to collect all and singular 

collector. \ sums of money for the ensuing year. 



And that Robert Osberne is guilty of the action aforesaid and that the aforesaid 
cow is, by right, of Richard Elis. And the costs and damages aforesaid are 
adjudged to Richard by the court at iiijd &c. 



Appendix 



313 



Fine xs. iiijd. 



And that William Pylbarow in mortal extremity on his bed surrendered into the 
lord's hand by the hand of William Syer bond tenant in the presence of divers 
men one Croft called " Paynes Crofte " containing iiij acres of bond land lying in 
Buxhall between lands of the manor of Buxhall and lands of the manor of Fenhalle 
on one side and lands late of William Pilborow on the other side, one headland 
abutting upon lands of John Salter and another headland abutting upon lands of the 
said William and one piece of meadow called benctes meadow containing one acre 
lying in Buxhall aforesaid between lands of the manor of Fennhalle on the further 
side, one headland abutting on lands of the manor of Buxhall called " peynes Crofte " 
and another headland abutting upon lands of the manor of Fenhalle to the behoof 
of his last will and testament by which it appears enough that the same William 
Pilborow amongst other things willed and declared as follows. "Item I bequeth 
to Margaret my wyff all my londes and tenements both fre and copye sett lyenge 
and being in Buxhall One house and Coddenham for terme of hir lyfFe naturall 
If she mary not Item I bequeath to William my sonne the tenement with all the 
londes both fre and copie to the same perteyning the which I lately bought of 
John Salter of Badwell p . . . nge Immediately after the death of the said Margaret 
my wyff to Edmond my sonne tenne pounds of lawfull English money and other 
tenne pounds of lawfull Englishe money to Agnes my dowghtcr And if Margaret 
my forseid wyff do mari then I will that the forseid William my sonne shall pay 
the forseid tenn pounds to Edmund my sonne at his age of xvj years and the other 
tenne pounds to Agnes my dowghter at her age of xvij ycres " And the aforesaid 
William Pilborow in his said will or Testament made and ordained his executors 
the aforesaid Margaret his wife and Nicholas Pilborow his son. And hereupon the 
aforesaid William Syer into whose hand the surrender aforesaid had been made 
present in court surrendered into the lord's hand the aforesaid iiij acres of land 
called Peynes Crofte and the aforesaid piece of meadow called Benettes meadow 
which the aforesaid William Pilborow lately had by the surrender of John Salter of 
Badwell and Joan his wife, as in the first year of Mary the now Queen it doth 
appear to the behoof of the aforesaid Margaret and her assigns for the term of her 
life if she shall live sole and unmarried And if she shall be wedded and married, 
with remainder according to the force form and effect of the aforesaid last will or 
testament of the said William Pilbarow the father as is abovesaid, to which same 
Margaret seizin is thereof delivered by the aforesaid William Syer her attorney To 
hold to herself and her assigns in manner and form abovesaid by the rod at the 
will of the lord according to the custom of the manor, saving the right &c 
Rendering therefor to the lord by the year for the aforesaid Croft called Peynes 
Crofte iijs. vjd. and for the aforesaid piece of meadoV xxd. And suit of Court 
And other service &c And she gives to the lord of fine &c And she did fealty 
to the lord &c. 



NOW OF THE LETE. 

common fine f Who say upon their oath that they do give and ought to give for a certain lete as 
of js. 1 of ancient usage was &c. 



3H 



Append! 



r And that Henry Richar encroached upon the common way with his hedge from the 
* I corner of his field as far as the corner of the meadow of Daniel Richar his brother. 

1 Therefore in mercy Sec And he is commanded to amend the encroachment before 
y the feast of the Nativity of our Lord next under penalty of iijs. iiijd. 

r And that the aforesaid Henry Richar has not yet cut off the branches of trees 
to forfeit I hanging across the high way from his house along the high way there as he had 

penalty of xijd. ] (to do) upon pain at the last lete under penalty of xijd. Therefore that 



% 



brfeited &c. 



to ferfeit 
penalty of 



to forfeit 
penalty of xijd. 



to forfeit 
penalty of xijd. 



Order, unde 
penalty. 



And that Henry Murton has not yet cleansed his ditch at Lytill Woodefylde as 
William Rychar had (to do) upon pain at the last lete, to wit : from his gate as far 
as Rogers tufte. Therefore that penalty is forfeited And he is commanded to well 
and sufficiently cleanse the aforesaid ditch from Smethes corner 4s far as Rogers 
Tufte before the feast of Easter next under penalty of iijs. iiijd. 

And that Edward Hubborde has not yet cleansed his ditch from Cogmans-lane towards 
Whyte Yerthes as he had to do at the last lete on pain of xijd. Therfore that 
penalty is forfeited &c And Richard Sare is commanded to well and sufficiently 
cleanse the ditch aforesaid before the aforesaid feast of Easter under penalty of ijs. 

And that William Berte has not yet cleansed his ditch in 2 separate places at Crosse 
strete as he had to do at the last lete on pain of xijd. Therfore that penalty 
is forfeited &c And he is commanded to well and sufficiently cleanse the ditch 
aforesaid before the feast of Easter aforesaid under penalty of ijs. 

Capital pledges order, that if any capital pledge of this lete being sworn, shall 
conceal or disclose any part of a verdict of the capital pledges among themselves 
found and agreed contrary to his oath, that each time he shall forfeit to the lord of 
this manor xs., to be levied upon his goods and chattels to the use of the lord. 

Also they order that if any inhabitant of this town shall let (.'share) his tenement 
to such man or woman who is a breaker of hedges or who shall milk the cows of 
any of the neighbours or who shall steal " sheves " out of the fields in autumn time 
or any the like (offences) that then such inhabitant shall answer to the aggreived 
party for such deeds perpetrated on any such farmer at his own proper costs and 
expcnccs, and besides he shall forfeit to the lord of this manor xijd. to be levied on 
his goods and chattels to the use of the lord &c. 



Also they order that William Syer shall procure for his wind mill such honest man 

as shall grind wheat, or other grain of any of the neighbours and besides make the 

J , , " mele " lawfully without any fraud or deceit or any other diminution of the tolls, 

under penalty. 

except under penalty of xs. forfeited to the lord of this manor to be levied on his 

\ goods and chattels to the use of the lord &c. 



' John Salter, "bochcr" 
, John Salter, senior 
Capital pledges. | j^;^^^^^ Leche 

William Skepper 



John Jacob 

John Deveras 

John Jower l-sworn. 

Robert Sevelos 

Walter Kysse 



John Cooke 
John Woode 
Robert Martyn 
Tshomas Salter 



Of distraii 
for fealty. 



Appendix 



315 



It is commanded to distrain Margaret Pylbarow so that she may be at the next 
Court here to be held, to do fealty to the lord for one messuage and six acres of 
land, meadow and pasture, late of John Salter held free of this manor by the service 
of iijs. iiij-i-d. by the year and suit of court Sec. 



Of distraint 
for fealtv. 



It is commanded to distrain James Crosse so that he may be here at the next 
Court to do fealty to the lord for one messuage and one acre of land to the same 
adjoining, held free of this manor by the service of 5|-d. by the year and suit of 
Court &c. 



Headborough. The tenement fasbornes 
The Mershe 

■ Taylors, Pyes & Wigmans 
Farthinges and Cleves 
Rames and Hawes 

Elis Tenement 
Taylors Tenement 
Bates Tenement " 
Readers Tenement 
Edward Salter's tenemente 
Darwises Tenement 
Hiccins and Hilles 
Robert Osbornes Tenemente 
Langmers Agglettes & Footcs 
Cogman's tenement 
Childc's tenement 
Henry Richers tenement 
Pyes tenement at Pyes 
woode 



Danyell Richer's tenement 
Oates Coote 
Kysses Tenement 
Agnes Salter's Tenement 
Robert Crosse for Scotes 

and Kebes 
John Crosse for Barbours 
Winters Tenement 
Thomas Smyth for Costardes 
The tenement at the Mille 
John Salter for Risbies 
Revelles Tenemente 
Revellcs Tenement at Bradbrokestrete 
Kenettes Tenemente 
The tenement at Buxhall woode 
Pilbarowcs tenement 
Andrew Saltcrs tenement 
Caprons tenement 
Lambcs tenement 
Wyllyam Syers tenement 



Swetmans tenement 
Wardes tenement 
Roger Salters Tenement 
Gages Tenement 
Gorelles tenement 

Cosons tenement 
The ferme of the 

manor of Buxhall 
Tilles Tenement in 

Bretnamstrete 



INDEX 



Adders Hai.i. Manor, 145, 224 

Aggletts, 128, 129, 130, 148, 150 

Aldanis, l87« 

Aldewock, Alderworke, 134, 137 

Aldham, 167 

Alms House Field, 202 

Alms Houses, 5 

Amptons al. Hardhedder, 187 

Babwell, Bequest to Friars of, 235 
Backhouse (Bakhous) Croft, 175 
Backhouse Fields, 150, 158 
Bacon family, 3, 14S, 211, 220, 231, 

230 
Badwell, 132, 133 
Baker family, 30, 88, 136, 157, 159, 164, 

185, 199 
Baldwin, Abbot of Bury, 11, 16, 24 
Bannards, 210 
Barbers (Barbours) and Berts, 12S, 129, 

130, 148, 154, 155, 168 
Barbers al. Barones land, 196 
Barkers, 2, 129, 130, 190, 226 
Baron, Court, 77, 78, 82, 181 
Barons, 4, 148, 219, 220, 221, 222, 

240 
Barons Lane, 4, 11, 168, 171, 220, 221 
Barony s, 53 
Barrowes, Barronhis, Barber's Parcel, 

168 
Battisford, 141 
Battisford Tye, 162 
Baynards, 211 

Bedwell, 63, 65, 199, 200, 201, 203 
Bells, 47, 48, 49, 65 
Benalls, Bannels, Benaldes, Benallys, 

196, 197, 203 
Bendies, 135 

Benets Meadow, 14S, 160, 194, 238/1 
Bennetts, 3, 211 
Bentall's Croft, 135 
Betts family, 176, 177, 237 
Betts, Wm., Will of (1551), 237 
Blackmans, 89, 212 



Blackmans, Little, 212, 213 
Blacksmith's shop, 2, 127, 227 
Blaxhall, Blakeshall, 31,96 
Blocks, Bleakes, Blokks, 187, 221 
Blomefield's "History of Norfolk,'' 

cited, 31, 49, 54 
Bloody Meadow, 9, 194 
Boarded Barn Farm, 163 
Boggas family, 119, 207, 224 
Bonnet, Grant to Walter Copinger to 

wear, 100 
Borough Lane, 5 

Boulogne family, 24, 25, 27, 170, 171 
Bounds, Beating the, 41 and n, 42 
Bowles played on green, 21, 55 
Boycroft, 214 
Boycroft, Great, 150 
Boycroft, Little, 148, 150 
Boyton Hall, 144 
Boyton Manor, 31 
Bradbrook al. Broadbrook Street, 5, 6, 

8, 9, 64, 89, 128, 129, 185, 214, 215, 
216 

Bradstreet, 134, 145, 164 

Bradstreet family, 33, 87, 129, 134, 145, 

150, 157, 158, 159, 164, 238 
Bradstreet, Edw., Will of {1572), 238 
Brandeston Manor, 183 
Brett family, 17, 155, 196, 213, 229 
Brettenham, Brethenham, Bretnani, i, 

9, 10, 14, i6«, 17, 28, 36, 105, 112, 
149. 157, 169, 184, 187, 191, 217, 239 

Brettenham Street al. Breton Street, 9, 

133, 134, 150, 157, 164 
Bricett, 62, 149, 187 
Broad Brook Street, 1S5, 231, 233 
Broode Meadow, Brodmedowes, 185, 

186 
Brook Farm, 10 
Brookefeld, 175 
Brookes, Brokes, 215 
Browns, Browys, 8, 129, 130, 190, 219, 

220, 231, 232, 241, 243 
Burford Bridge, 53, 144 



Bury St. Edmunds, 14, 15, 16, 24, 47, 

74, 117, 151, 156, 171, 182, 184, 1S6, 

191, 192, 210, 224, 229 
Bury Abbey, 50« 
Bury Church, St. Mary's, 185 
Butterfly Farm, 5, 136, 190, 196, 223, 

224 
Buxhall, Acreage of, 14 ; Danes in, 23 ; 

Derivation of, 15 ; in Domesday, 15 ; 

its extent, 24; Healthiness of, 15; 

Population at various times, 14 
Buxhall Hall, 25, 38, 53, 63, 112, 115 
Buxhall Hall Farm, III, 125 
Buxhall House, 10, 190, 194 
Buxhall Lodge, i, 5, 190, 20S 
Buxhall Manor, Extent of, 86 ; List of 

Lords of, 130 
Buxhall Marsh, Description of, 203, 204, 

240 
Buxhall Post Office, 2, 130 
Bu.xhall Rectory, i, 2, 200 
Buxhall Street, 21S 
Buxhall Tye, 6, 20, 112 
Buxhall Vale, 3, 10, 190, 194 
Buxhall Wood, 128, 129, 166, 206, 

215 

Camping Field, 194 

Cantelin, Cantelon family, 27, 172 

Cantloes or Cantlow, 224 

Caprons, 128 

Carpenter family, 112, 155, 222, 242 

Carpenter, Wm., Will of (1652), 242 

Cat family, 30, 51 

Cat, Thos., Will of (1392), 51 

Gates Coates, 4, 129, 148, 220 

Chalybeate Spring in Buxhall, 4 

Chapel, Primitive Methodist, 6 

Chaplyn's Farm, 125/; 

Charities, 37, 73 

Child family, 129, 231, 240 

Child, Daniel, Will of (1623), 240 

Childes, 128, 130 

Chilton hamlet, 23, 24 



Church, 2, i8, 46 ; Description of, 45, 

46 ; Restoration of, 47 
Church goods, 65 
Church Green, 36 
Church Meadow, 127 
Church Street, 129, 225, 227, 22S 
Churchwardens' Accounts, Extracts 

from, 70-76 
Churchyard, Headstones in, 49, 50 
Churnmilk Farm, 10 
Chypelfilde, 221 
Clarkes Croft, 210, 211, 212 
Claypytt feilde, 221 
Cleves, 2 

Clock, 49, 55, 70, 72, 73. 74 
Cockerells Hall and Estate, 4, 7, S, 9, 

19, 27, 31, 49, 50K, 64, 105, 142, 146, 

171, 172, 178, 179, 219,222, 232 
Cockerells Hall Manor, 124, 150, 164, 

168, 170, 175, 176, 177, 179, 218, 221, 

237, 242 
Cocksalls Cophalls, Coxhall, in, 112, 

124, 148, 152 
Cocksalls Manor, 86, 186 
Cocksalls Meadow, 186 
Cocksall Old Rettons, 105 
Cocksedge's, Mr., Account to Sir Edw. 

Ward, 192 
Cogman'sFarm, in, 12S, 129, 191, 225 
Cogman's Lane, 5, 9, 63, 129, 145, 223, 

225 
Cogsett al. Cocksetts garden, 112, 118, 

124, 191, 192, 194 
Cokerell family, 27, 30, 31, 44, 97, 172, 

173. 175 
Colchester, St. John's Abbey, 2, 2S, 62 
Coles Farm, 8, 9, 130, 190, 214, 216, 

233 
Combs, 14, 23, 24, 33. 35. '55. 205 
Cooper's Lane, 10 
Copdock, 30, 166 
Copinger, Origin of name, 52;: 
Copinger family, 4, 7, 8, 9, 19, 21, 30, 
31. 33. 34. 35. 37. 40, 44. 45. 47, 49, 
52, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 60, 62, 63, 66, 
83, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, loi, 
102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 
no, in, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 
118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 
126, 128, 130, 131, 138, 149, 152, 158, 
159, 16S, 169, 171, 178, 179, 180, 181, 
190,191, 192,194,196,200,204,207, 
211, 214, 216, 217,218, 219, 222, 223, 
225, 226, 232, 233, 235, 236, 237, 238, 
240, 243, 244 
Copinger, Agnes, Will of (1599), 240 
Copinger, Henry, Will of, 1 14 



Index 

Copinger, John, Will of {1441), 235 

Copinger, Wm., Will of (1436), 53 

Copinger, Margaret, Will of (1710), 243 

Copinger Hall, 190 

Copingers Field, 162, 239/i 

Copperfield, 202 

Copyholders of the Manor, 148 

Copyholds enfranchised, 164 

Cordes, 53, 175, 224 

Coslands, 5 

Cosons, Cossyns, 128, 129 

Costardes, 128, 129, 198 

Cottage Farm, 209 

Cottage, The, 3, 130, 190, 211 

Court Rolls {see Appendix), Extracts 
from, 18, 19, 20, 21, 83, loi, 12S, 175 

Courts of the Manor, Description of, 77 

Courts, Right to hold, iSi 

Cow, Gift of red, 239 

Greeting, 23, 24, 30, 32, 33 

Greeting St. Peter, 35 

Greeting West, 34, 187;; 

Crosse family, 6«, 33, 128, 132, 134, 
139, 152, 154, 163, 168, 201, 202, 204, 
212, 227, 228, 229, 238, 242 

Crosse, Edw., Will of (1635), 242 

Crosse, John, Will of (1571), 238 

Crosse Street, 5 1 

Crosse Street Green, 152 

Crosseuers, 196 

Crossland, 152 

D.wiNGTON Court Estate, 102, 104 

Deenes Woode, 129 

Deepwell Cottages, 1 1 

Denys Fylde, 1S8 

Dickenson, Geo., fined for playing 

bowls, 21, 55 
Domesday, 18, 24, 25, 62 
Dovecote, 17, 18 
Dovehouse, 64, 65 
Drinkstone; i6«, 50;;, 173, 1S5, 239 
Drivers Land, 37 
Drivers Ley Meadow, 126 
Ducking-stool, 17 

Edgars, 65 
Edwardes, 136, 145 
Elis, Elysses, 12S, 129, 130 
Elizabeth's, Q., visit to Onehouse, 32 
Elmsett, 178 
Elmswell, 29« 
Enhams, 36 
Entre, The, 209 
Erewell River, 16 

Esturmy, Sturmyn, family, 28, 29, 30, 
31, 44, 94, 95, 96, 97, 130 



Everard family, 205, 207, 208, 224, 225 

Eye, 152 

Eye Honor, 93, 97;; 

Farrow Field, 127 

Farthings and Cleves, 2, 12S, 129, 190, 

229, 230 
Fasbourn al. Copinger al. Fareborne al. 

Fausebrounys Hall, 6, 9, 17, in, iiS, 

igo, 191, 193, 194, 215, 21S, 223, 233, 

236 
Fasbournes, 21, 105, in, n 2, 115, 1 28, 

233 
Fausebroun, Geoff., 30, 51, 190 
Fawkneses Wood, iSS, 1S9 
Fen Street, 3, 10, 132, 213 
Fenn Farm, Little, 1 1 
Fenn Hall, 3, n, 31, 160, 171, 182, 211 
Fenn Hall Manor, 27, 91, 160, 182, 186, 

187, 1S8, 209, 210, 212, 221 
Fewks Meadow, Little, l6S 
Finborough, Finesbrigg, Fymbarowe, 

24, 27, 29, 35, 7I«, 64, 86, 94, 96, 

132, 140, 144, 145, 154, 162, 167, 171, 

l87«, 229, 237, 238, 239 
Finborough Great, 5, 14, 16, 17, 30, 31, 

32, 36, 43, 4SK, 53, 73, 105, 1 10, 112, 

136, 146, 147, 163, 166, 191, 195, 

197, 198, 202, 207, 208, 223, 224 
Finborough Green, 162, 197 
Finborough Hall, iS, 33, 147, 166, 1S5 
Finborough High Road, 5, 197 
Finborough, Little, 14, 32, 105, no, 

112, 146, 191 
Finborough Vicarage, 199, 200, 201 
Finborough White Horse, 73 
Fines, Extracts from Feet of, 29, 51 
Fire Engine, 74, 76 
Fish Ponds, 4, 17, 223 
Folkard family, 45 
Font, 46 

Footes, 128, 129, 130, 134, 140 
Foots and Kybes, 132 
Fotes and Ketes, 12S 
Frankpledge, 17, 78, 79, 80, 81 
Free tenants of the Manor, 132 
Friars, 130 

Frodo, II, 24, 26, 186 
Frotes, 238 

Fryers, 2, 129, 190, 203, 228, 229 
Fuller family, 37, 38, 40, 49, 50, 60, 66, 

67, 68, 69, 72, 73, 146, 151, 157, 165, 

185, 203, 205, 210, 218 
Fundlings al. Barons, &c., 14S, 16S, 196 

Gages, 12S, 129 
Gardenfield, 211 



-318 



Index 



Gardiner Bridge, i, 199, 200, 203 

Gardiner Street, i, 132, 197, 201, 204 

Gardiners, 37 

Gardiners, Little, 112, 113, 126 

Garners, Great, 214 

Garnham family, 10,37,65, 74, 161, 195 

Gipping, 32, 33, 35 

Gipping River, 16 

Goddard family, 10, 35, 37, 66, 161, 194, 

195, 212 
Goddards, 161 
Gooch family, 61, 127 
Goodday family, 113, 117, iiS, 121, 123, 

191, 193, 216, 219 
Goodday, Geo., Letters to Rev. Mr. 

Copinger from, 119, 120 
Gorelles, I2S 
Gorey Croft, 134 
Gravel pittes, 221, 222 
Gream Any Croft, 137 
Green, Church, 36 
Green, Village, 19, 20, 2r, 22 
Grenewaye al. Bradbrooke Street, Sg 
Grey Friars, 2 

Grindell or Watercourse, 168, 196 
Gunneldecroft, 186 
Gunnels v, HoUybush 

Hadi.eigh, 121, 122, 123, 177 

Hamais, 29 

Hamlings or Ilamblins, 127, 209, 211 

Hardheads al. Hardhols, 9, 1 12, 124, 223 

Harleian charters cited, 173 

Harleston, Ilalston, 14, 31, 33, 35, 61, 
195, 20S 

Haughley, Ilaule, Ilawelee, 23, 24, 
29«. 31. 33. 35- 51 

Hawes, Hawds, 129, 148, 15S, 164, 165 

Headstones, 49, 50 

Herdhedder Meadow, 134 

Heygate, Highgate, 134, 139, 141, 146 

Heygate al. Higgat Field, 145 

Heygate Lane, 141 

Hiccinsand HiUes, 12S, 130 

High Street, 5, 12S, 135, 136, 154, 206 

High Street Green, 154, 162, 20S 

Highams, 3, 129, 209, 210, 211 

Hill family, 3, i6k, 36, 37, 39, 40, 42, 
43, 45, 47, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 65, 66, 
67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 73, 75, 76, 125, 
126, 127, 128, 131, 159, 167, 180, 
181, 194, 203, 205, 208, 210, 211, 
212, 213, 214, 217, 218, 219, 225, 
226, 227, 228, 229, 231, 232, 233, 
23s, 236 

Hills in Buxhall, 17 

Hills, Hylls, 129, 209, 220, 221 



Hills Entry, 210, 211 

Hintlesham, 50K, 177, 178 

History, methods of treating parish 

examined, 13 
Hitcham, Hecham, Heckham, Hycham, 

Hytcham, 5, 14, i6«, 28, 30, 31, 43, 

105, 112, 140, 177, 184, 1S7, 191, 

223, 239 
Hivetree Farm, 10 
Hoggs Meadow, 119 
Holbeck Meadow, 150 
HoUingsworth's " Stowmarket," cited, 

13, 15, 24, 26«, 44 
HoUybush al. Gunnals, al. Waspes 

Farm, 4, 11, 38, 129, 130, 177, 17S, 

igo, 218, 2ig, 220 
Home Field, ig8, 202 
Hopyard in Buxhall, 126 
Horsewager, Horse-Mayre, 144 
Houghton family, 7, 31, 132, I5g, 

184 
Howard, John, Will of (I457). 53 
Howletts, 114, 115, 168, ig5, ig6 
Hungerford family, 7, 132, 184 
Huyfeld, 135 
Hyghefield, 136 

IcKWORTH Manor, 174 

Iken, 28, 2g 

Ingelric, 24, 25, 170 

Inhams, 64, 65 

Inmans, 64 

Inquisitiones Nonarum, 44 

Inwood, lOi 

Ipswich, 14, 16, 17;;, 27, 46, 64, 119, 

121, 171, 177, 193, 197, 217. 231 
Ipswich Great Domesday, 27, 94 
Itinerary of parish, i 
Ixworth, 54 

Jarold's Wood, 58, 243 

Jermyn family, 103, 107, 109, 158, 159, 

177 
Jewer or Jewers family, 67, 143, 147, 

196 
Joes Mill, 144 

Jordans Lays, Jordingleys, 214, 217 
Jower, Jowre family, go, 142, 143, 146, 

147, ig7, 204, 23g, 240 
Jower, Wm., Will of, 240 

Kemball family, 8, 37, 40, 41, 67,68, 
69, 73. 74. 76, 88, 127, 156, 169, 
223, 227 

Kemballs Farm, 7, 57 

Kennetts, Cannetts, 2, 128, 129, 130, 
190, 225, 226, 228 

Kiln Lane, 6, 9 



Kinshins, Kinchans, Kynchens, Quin- 

shins, 85, iiS7, 215 
Knights' fee. Amount of, 27 
Kynchnors, 189 
Kynge family, 8, 169, 194?; 
Kynkyne, 189 
Kyssebyes, 213 
Kysses, 128 

Laman, Thos., Will of (i58g), 239 
Lambert family, 38, 39, III, 1S5, 192, 

193. 231 
Lambes, 128 

Lancaster, Honor of, 27, 28, 171K 
Langmers, 128, 129, 130, 150, 187,215 
Lanman, Laman, Lawman family, 157, 

162, 239 
Lavenham, Lamenham, 56, 64, 103, 

105, 106, 107, III, 152, 175, 176, 

177 
Leches, 129, 130 
Leet, Court, 7S-S9 
Leffey, Leaffey, Lefflye Hall, 67, 31, 

181, 182, 185 
Leffey Manor, 19, 27, 32, 11 g, 134, 

135. 150. 152, 158, 168, 17s, 181, 

183, 184, 185, 186, ig6 
Leffey Meadow, 6 
Lepkyns, 145 

Leversfield, Lyverfield, 186 
Lock Meadow, 113, 200 
Lockwood family, 72, 86, 136, ig7, 

202, 242 

Lockwood, Thos., Will of (1646), 242 
Lodge Farm, i, 5, I2g, 190, 197, igS, 

203, 205 

Longmers, Longmas, 141, 150, 159 

Lover's walk, 7 

Lower Farm, 43 

Lydgate, Monk ol Bury, 16 

Maidwells, 2 

Mallyn Down, igg, 200, 201 

Malt House al. Makings, 6, 17, 43 

Maltywards family, 10, 35, 38, 4g, 50, 

66, 161, ig4, igs 
Manor, Etymology of, 77 
Martin family, 33, 35, 63, 64, 72, 84, 

8g, 112, I2g, 138, 140, 142, 147, 

158, 202, 20S, 209, 210, 211, 213, 

214, 215, 221, 241 
Martin Field, 63, 214 
Martin, Richard, Will of (1631), 240 
Maye family, 221, 222, 240 
Maye, Simon, Will of (1621), 240 
Maypole Farm, 2, 130, igo, 212, 213 
Meadowegate, 209, 210 



Index 



319 



Meare Picks al. Marl Pikes, 149 

Melle damme, 135 

Melford, Long, 157, 186, 205 

Mendlesham, 168, 224, 239, 242 

Mill, 4, 17, 18, 19, 25 

Mill Cottages, 190, 230 

Mill Field, 19, 20, 38, 112, 113, 115, 

220, 221, 222 
Mill Green, 6, 148, 163 
Mill Hill, 135, 136 
Mill Street, 6 

Misery al. Micherie Lane, 7, 41 
Moyle family, 179, 180, 219, 222, 232 
MuUetts, 7 
Murton family, 154, 166, 206, 208, 232, 

241 
Muskett family, 7, 34, 150, 158, 159. 

212, 213 

Noah's Ark Farm, 7, 8, 186 
North family, 132, 154, 166, 167, 17S, 
198, 223, 243 

Old Pond Field, 7, 1S6 

Onehoiise, 7, 10, 14, 23, 24, 28, 31, 

32. 33. 35. 43. 72. 1^7", 195 
Organ, 49, 172 

Orwell al. Erewell River, 16, 17 
Osborne family, 55, 66, 129, 135, 150, 

151, 157, 182, 209, 213 
Overhill, 210, 211 
Overierdge, 145 
Overwood, 169 
Oxer family, 40, 67, 71, 72, 165 

Paddock Meadow, 198, 217 

Parish Officers, List of, 65-69 

Parish Registers, 244-305 

Park Farm, 5, 9, 10, 190, 223 

Parkin family, 166, 167 

Parminsters, 58, 243 

Passefonte family, 55, 87 

Passefonte, Thomas, Will of (1567), 54 

Patent Rolls, Extracts from, 29, 51 

Paynes Bridge, 10, 188 

Paynes Croft, 148, 160, 194, 213, 23SH 

Petit family, 102, 119, 169, 192, 193 

Petits Ley, 10 

Pettiward, R. J., 41, 65 

Pictaviensis, Roger, 24, 92, 94, 130 

Pike family, 61, 68, 69, 201 

Pilbarowe family, 9, 10, 66, 88, 112, 
115, 129, 132, 133, 142, 157, 159, 
160, 165, 202,. 216, 218, 223, 238, 
242 

Pilbarowe, John, Will of (1597), 238 

Pilbarowe, John, Will of (1637), 242 

Pilbarowes, 9, 128, 129, 130, 216 



Plumb's Farm, 21S 

Poictou, Roger de, 25, 26, 92, 93, 171/; 

Pond Farm, 10 

Ponds at Park Farm, 223 

Ponds, Fish, 4, 17, 223 

Poor's Rate (1729), 37 

Pot Ash Office, 226 

Pound, 17, iS 

Pound House or Cottage, 18 

Powell's. Farm, 9, 112, 114, 216 

Purcas family, 155, 156, 226, 229 

Purple Hill Farm, 10, 56, 130, 190, 

210, 212, 213 

Purr family, 40, 49, 67, 68, 69, 74, 76, 

127, 156, 162, 226 
Pyes and Hymans, 12S, 197 
Pye Hatch, 8, 10, 88, 112, 113, 116, 

118, 124, 125, 126, 127, 169 
Pyes Tenement, 12S, 129, 130 
Pyes Street, 169 

QuAiLSTONE, 134, 144 

Ramflyn's, 37 

Rattlesden, 11, 14, 16, 17, 23, 28, 29;;, 
30, 31, 32, 41, 42, 45.48''. 56, 97. 

105, no, U2, 114, 129, 148, 149, 
164, 173, 187, 191, 195, 205, 209, 

211, 218, 220, 221, 231, 236 

Rattlesden Field, 198 

Rattlesden Manor, 3, 58, 243 

Rattlesden Wood, 5S, 243 

Rectors, 59 

Rectory built (17 10), 42 

Redenhall family, 52;;, 114, 139, 175, 

Reeve family, 54, 56, 206 
Registers, Parish, 244-305 
Revelles, 128, 129, 130 
Reynolds, 9, 107, 112, u8, 121, 140, 

166, 177, 215, 223 
Richer family, 4, 20, 33, 39, 40, 66, 67, 
69, 70, 71, 73, 86, 128, 129, 130, 136, 
149, 150, 184, 186, 19S, 199, 201, 
203, 206, 211, 225, 226, 228, 230 
Risbies, 128, 129, 130, 212 
River in Buxhall, 16 
Rivett family, 2, II, 82, 91, I03, 132, 

133, 187, 1S9 
Rivetts, 3, 129, 130, 190, 208 
Rowley family, 11, 186, 187, 18S 
Rudlands, 8, 138, 190, 233, 234 
Rush family, 150, 232, 240, 241 
Rush Meadow, 199, 200, 202, 203 
Rushbrooke, 103, 109, 177, 187 
Rydnal family, 168, 195, 196, 215, 239, 
240 



Rydnal, Robert, Will of (1597), 239 ' 
Rydnal, Robert, Will of(i63i). 242 

Salter family, 3, 8, 10, 20, 21, 33, 34 
35. 37.38.55.65. 72. 73. S3. S4. 86 
128, 129, 130, 132, 133, 137, 138 
139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 14S, 160, 

165, 176, 188, 196, 197, 206, 209, 
210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 220, 221 
225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231 
237, 238, 244 

Salter, Roger, Will of, 237 

Salters, 8, 10, 38, 129, 188, 209, 219 

Savernak, 28 

Scotes and Kebes, 128, 129 

Selowes v. Smyth 

Semans Croft, 140 

Seyrs family, 129 ; v. Syre 

Shelland, Shellone, 14, 29;/, 31, 35, 

49. 165, i87«, 195 
Shelland Hall, 175 
Sieelys, 133 
Sink, The, 210 
Skondons al. Scotyna Meadow, 144, 

220, 221 
Slyders, Sleyders, 63, 113 
Small Hobbyes, 145, 14S, 162, 239 
Smallpox prevalent, 35 
Smith's Farm, 112, 124, 236, 242 
Smythe al. Bayiy al. Selowes family, 7, 

68, 89, 102, 128, 135, 136, 137, 138, 
139, 140, 142, 145, 146, 147, 148, 

166, 197, 200, 204, 206, 215, 216, 
219, 220, 238, 239 

Smythes and Bradstrets, 14S, 157 

Sowgate family, 18, 20, 21, 143 

Sparrow family, 124, 125, 127 

Spearmomdowns, 1 85 

Spertam, 209 

Spetyllman Street, 6, 134, 158 

Spikes Street, 203 

Spink family, 11, 37, 41, 45, 67, 68 

69. 71. 74. 76, 127, 156, 188, 21S, 
226 

Spring family, 103, 132, 134, 175, 176, 

177, 184, 187, 188, 189 
Standons Meadows, 137 
Stearn family, 7, 39, 40, 61, 66, 67, 69, 

71, 73, 74, 127, 149, 165, 212, 218, 

219, 220, 222, 232 
Stebbings v. Wards 
Stocks, Village, 17 
Stone from Caen used in building Bury 

Abbey, 16 
Stone Farm, 5, 128, 167, 223 
Stonyland, 185 
Stonyland Pasture, 200 



320 



Index 



Stowmarket al. Thorney, 14, 15, 16, 
17K, 23, 24, 31, 32, 35, 49, 50, 64, 
72, 115K, 126, 130, 151, 155, 156, 
163, 166, 171, 187K, 191, 192, 209, 
218, 231 

St«wnpland, 33, 35, 157 

Studd family, 21, 141, 226, 22S, 230^ 
233. 234 

Sturman's Croft, 199, 200, 201, 202, 
203 

Sturmyn v. Esturmy 

Styllemans Street, 134 

Subsidy Rolls, Extracts from, 32, 33 

Sulyard family, 37, 149-ISI. 182, 212 

Sulyards, 2 

Surveyors' Books, Extracts from, 40 

Sweeps Hall, 10 

Swetmans, 128, 129 

Syre, Sier, Syer family, 32, 33, 34, 35, 
37H, 55, 64, 86, 90, 141, 146, 155, 
159, 188, 189, 209«, 210, 234, 238 

Talons, 147 

Taylor family, 39, 51, 129, 133, 137, 

138, 152, 155, :62, 229 
Taylors, 5, 90, 12S, 129, 197 
Taylors Croft, 137, 220, 221 
Taylors Pyes, 128, 129 



Terriers, 62-65 

Tile Kilne, 115, 135 

Tilles, 128 

Timperley family, 31, 50, 132, 144 

Tithes, 65 

Tylehill, 113 

Uri'ER Bainow, 142 

Valley Cottages, 232 

Valley Farm, 8, 17, 18, 130, 190, 214, 

215, 218, 219, 233 
Vesey family, 4, 5o«, 124, 171, 177, 

178, 179, 219 
Village Green, 19, 20, 2i, 22 
Village stocks, 17 

Wade family, 4, 86, 89, 112, 115, 192, 

195, 196, 230 
Wallers, 8, 214 
Walles Meadow, 63 
Wallings, 209, 2IO 
Warburton family, 205, 208, 224, 225 
Ward family, i, 30, 33, 40, 66, 67, 70, 

71, 72, 118, 119, 191, 192, 194, 223 
Wards, 5, 128, 129, 136, 223 
Wards and Stebbings, 169 
Warren family, 26, 87, 148, 157, iSi, 

182, 225 



Waspes V. Hollybush, &c. 

Wells, Eugene, 10, 65, 195 

Wenieve family, 115, 116, 144, 178 

Wetherden, 23, 24, 28, 31, 33, 35, iSo 

Weyland family, 28, 29, 31, 182, 183 

Whalebone Farm, 7 

Wheatcroft, 210 

Whitings, Whytyngas, 139 

White erthe, 139 

Wills, Early, with extracts, 235-243 

Windishes a/ Wynchyshes, 3, 129, 130, 

209 
Windmill in Buxhall, 112, 115 
Wood family, 134, 137, 140, 143, 150, 

156, 164, 185, 200, 201, 202, 203, 

205, 216, 230 
Wood Street, 8, 9, 85, 86, 185K, 215 
Woodfield, 166, 197, 208, 214, 215 
Woodfield, Great, 205, 207 
Woodfield, Little, 166, 205, 206 
Woodfield, Middle, 205, 207 
Woodhall Manor, 3, 32, 188 
Woollen, Burials in, 300, 301 
Woolpit, Woollpytt, I, 31, 40, 71, 72, 

151, 196, 210, 223, 240 
Worlands, 43 
World's End, 8, 9, 10, 127 
Wygmans, 90 



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